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The De Facto Embargo is Over: Record-High Conflict-Free Minerals Exports from Eastern Congo

Tin ore

The conflict-free minerals trade has been slowly but steadily increasing in recent years, and 2016 resulted in record-high exports from the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo once again. The North Kivu province, the most 3T-rich minerals province in Congo, exported record-high conflict-free export numbers for both tin and tantalum in 2016. This counters the claims that Dodd-Frank 1502, often referred to as the conflict minerals law, is leading to a de facto embargo on eastern Congo’s minerals.  Read More »

New Brief - Dangerous Divisions: The Central African Republic faces the threat of secession

Today, the Enough Project published “Dangerous Divisions: The Central African Republic faces the threat of secession,” in which author Nathalia Dukhan documents how the Central African Republic (CAR) is currently undergoing a process of de facto partition.  Read More »

2017 Conflict Minerals Company Rankings

This Valentine’s Day the Enough Project is excited to announce we will once again be ranking leading companies on their efforts to source conflict-free minerals from Congo. With the Dodd-Frank 1502 conflict minerals law under increasing threat of being repealed or weakened, this consumer holiday is the perfect time to let companies know we expect a strong commitment to conflict-free sourcing.  Read More »

UN Report Confirms Prevalence of War Economy in Central African Republic

MINUSCA peacekeepers in PK5, Bangui. May 2015.

In its final report for 2016 released in December, the U.N. Security Council’s Panel of Experts on the Central African Republic (CAR) confirmed that the trafficking of arms and natural resources continues to be central in the perpetuation of violence in the country.  Read More »

UN Report Reaffirms Alarming Security Situation in Central African Republic

Seized ammunition of ex-Séléka rebels in Bria. February 2015.

The U.N. Security Council’s Panel of Experts on the Central African Republic (CAR) released its final report for 2016 in December. The 186-page report documents a sharp deterioration in the security situation and a deepening crisis in CAR since August 2016. The country continues to be ruled by a multitude of criminal gangs that fiercely compete for control of economic resources.  Read More »

Enough Project Statement on U.S. Refugee Policy

The Enough Project is dedicated to ending genocide and crimes against humanity in East and Central Africa, including in Sudan and Somalia. A key aspect of combating these atrocities is to ensure protection of innocent people fleeing this violence, especially when the governments responsible for protecting their civilians either cannot, or will not, do so.  Read More »

Enough's 5 Recommended Reads | Feb. 9

Enough's 5 Recommended Reads is a biweekly series featuring important stories you may have missed.   Read More »

New Analysis Shows Costs for U.S. Companies to Implement Conflict Minerals Law 74-85% Lower than Expected

On February 6th, Elm Sustainability Partners, an independent advisory firm, published detailed information demonstrating that implementation costs related to federal conflict minerals reporting requirements for businesses have been substantially lower than expected and U.S. companies have in fact seen “tangible business benefits.”  Read More »

Fox News Op-ed: Congo's Violent Kleptocracy at a Crossroads

At fifteen minutes to midnight on New Year’s Eve, early fireworks went off in the Democratic Republic of Congo. These weren’t to celebrate another new year, but rather the signing of an agreement that, if implemented, paves the way for the country’s first ever peaceful, democratic transition of power.   Read More »

Missing the Point on South Sudan

On January 18, Ambassador Donald Booth took the stage at the United States Institute of Peace to reflect on his tenure as U.S. Special Envoy to Sudan and South Sudan. During this discussion, Booth’s mention of the missed opportunities for meaningful action early in South Sudan’s civil war was noticeably absent. While lamenting miscalculations regarding the selfish ways of the country’s political leaders and wondering how the new administration could “incentivize” peace, he failed to reflect on what might have been the administration’s most consequential decision . . . or lack thereof.  Read More »

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