Enough Said

New Comprehensive Study - "A Criminal State: Understanding and Countering Institutionalized Corruption and Violence in Congo"

Enough's new comprehensive study reveals how the Democratic Republic of Congo is not a failed state—for everyone. It is a failure for the vast majority of Congolese who suffer from abysmal security, healthcare, and education services. However, it is an efficient state for ruling elites and their commercial partners who seek to extract or traffic resources at the expense of Congo’s development. Over the past 130 years, Congo has had many elements of violent kleptocracy, a system of state capture in which ruling networks and commercial partners hijack governing institutions and maintain impunity for the purpose of resource extraction and for the security of the regime. Violence has been the systemic companion of these regimes.  This study argues that President Kabila and his close associates rely in large part on theft, violence, and impunity to stay in power at the expense of the country’s development. If international policymakers are to have a real impact in helping Congolese reformers actually reform the system, they need to shift the lens through which they view the conflict.  Read More »

Daily Maverick Op-ed: Sudan – Real and Imagined

There are two Sudans: one real and one imagined. In the imaginary Sudan, President Omar al-Bashir’s government is leading a meaningful National Dialogue that will address grievances, reconcile differences, and eventually lead to a democratic state. In this fictitious Sudan, the Sudan Armed Forces fight a just war against unappeasable rebels in the country’s south, while instability and violent conflict are largely a thing of the past in Darfur.  Read More »

Defining Violent Kleptocracy in East and Central Africa, by Ken Menkhaus and John Prendergast

In several recent publications and Congressional hearings, the Enough Project has used the term “violent kleptocracy” to describe the nature of the principal systems in place in our organization’s focus countries: Sudan, South Sudan, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the Central African Republic, and Somalia. Although the details and structure of the violent kleptocracy may differ in each country, the results are similar: conflict, death, impunity, democratic deficit, and wide-scale looting of state assets.  Read More »

President Obama Signs Anti-Wildlife Trafficking Legislation into Law

On October 7, 2016, H.R. 2494, the Eliminate, Neutralize, and Disrupt Wildlife Trafficking Act of 2016 was signed into law by President Obama. This law will support the protection of elephants, rhinos, and other endangered species from a from a sophisticated international poaching and trafficking trade that is decimating animal populations worldwide and funding armed groups.  Read More »

New Report - “Bankrupting Kleptocracy: Financial Tools to Counter Atrocities in Africa’s Deadliest War Zones”

Enough’s latest report describes how several conflict-affected countries in East and Central Africa have been hijacked, and how the U.S. government can use three potent financial tools of pressure as part of an overall strategy to counter mass atrocities in these countries.  Read More »

TIME Op-Ed: How to Ensure Lasting Peace in South Sudan

The world’s newest country, South Sudan, finds itself mired in the complicated fog of war that at its worst could combine the genocidal ethnic targeting of 1994 Rwanda with the warlordism of 1990s Somalia. Tens of thousands have died and millions displaced, and armed rebellions are emerging throughout the country. Village attacks, food aid obstruction, mass rape and child soldier recruitment all are rearing their ugly heads again.   Read More »

New Amnesty International Report Accuses Sudan of Using Chemical Weapons in Darfur

Amnesty International’s newly released report “Scorched Earth, Poisoned air,” documents the use of chemical weapons by the Sudanese government in the Jebel Marra region of Darfur.  Read More »

Formation of New Rebel Movement Increases Number of Armed Groups in South Sudan

On the September 27, 2016, a new rebel movement formerly allied to David Yau Yau - and calling itself the Cobra faction - defected from the South Sudanese government. Led by General Khalid Boutros, a former deputy to Yau Yau, the group has declared war against the government.  Read More »

Andy Mulumba to Sec. Kerry: Cause for Concern Due to the Upcoming Crisis Related to the Election in the DRC

It is an honorable privilege to write this letter and an undeniable, exciting feeling to say the least. First off, please allow me to properly introduce myself. My name is Andy Mulumba. Born and raised in the Democratic Republic of Congo, I spent some time in Montreal, Quebec at the age of 12, and received my collegiate education at the University of Eastern Michigan, graduating in Business Management in April 2013. This is such a great highlight in my life and I cannot thank you enough for taking the time to read this letter.  Read More »

US Senate Unanimously Passes Resolution Calling for Strong U.S. Stance on Congo Elections, Targeted Sanctions

On September 13, the United States Senate unanimously passed S.Res.485 - A resolution urging the Government of the Democratic Republic of the Congo to comply with constitutional limits on presidential terms and fulfil its constitutional mandate for a democratic transition of power in 2016. This resolution comes at an increasingly tense and critical time in Congo. According to the Congolese constitution, September 19th is the deadline for the elections commission to announce that presidential elections will be held in time for President Kabila’s departure from office on December 19.  Read More »

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