Enough Said

Djibouti Corruption Case Dismissed by UK Courts

A U.K. court recently dismissed a claim made by the Government of Djibouti against a powerful businessman who had fallen out of favor with the government. The politically-connected businessman, Abdourahman Mohamed Mahmoud Boreh, is credited with playing an integral role in the development of the nation’s ports, oil storage, and duty free facilities. The government is petitioning for control of these facilities that are currently owned by Dubai-based DP World and other subsidiaries.  Read More »

Wildlife Trafficking and Poaching - A Threat to Animals, Atrocity Prevention, and Transparency

Wildlife poaching and trafficking are horrific crimes against animals, and those who work on human rights should also recognize the nexus between those crimes in their own right, corruption, and the human atrocities committed by many of the groups who profit from the illicit trade.  Read More »

South African Court Rejects Impunity: “Decision Not to Arrest Bashir Inconsistent with Law”

Earlier this week, South Africa’s Supreme Court of Appeal (SCA) rejected the government’s appeal of a lower court decision over its failure to arrest suspected international criminal and Sudan President Omar al-Bashir. Bashir traveled to South Africa last June to attend an African Union (AU) summit. The lower court held that the government violated South African law by allowing Bashir to leave the country before a court could rule on whether South African officials should arrest him due to his two outstanding International Criminal Court (ICC) arrest warrants.  Read More »

Enough Project in NY Times: Root Cause & Solutions to the War in South Sudan

In a riveting dispatch for the New York Times from South Sudan "Where the Soldiers Are Scarier Than the Crocodiles", Nicholas Kristof documents the terror and struggles of people who have sought refuge from war, hiding with their families in swamps and marshy islands to escape attacks by soldiers. Kristof says no solutions are ideal, but calls for "an arms embargo and sanctions aimed at the assets of individuals on each side of the civil war. Make leaders pay a price for intransigence, instead of profiting from it."  Read More »

Staggering Amounts of Dirty Money in London

In a recent article in the New Statesman, author James Nickerson focuses on the issue of money laundering in London and the United Kingdom. With an estimated £48 billion laundered through the UK, accounting for 2 percent of GDP, London is now the world’s leading place for corruption-based money laundering, he writes.  Read More »

Nubians Protest Nile River Dams

Activists protest in front of the Embassy of Saudi Arabia in Washington, D.C.

On March 10, 2016, several Sudanese organizations and activists protested in front of the Embassy of Saudi Arabia in Washington, D.C. expressing their concern over the Saudi government’s agreement to finance dam projects in Nubia. With proposals to build three dams along the Nile River, the benefit of enhanced hydroelectric power does not outweigh the destruction of one of the world’s richest archaeological sites and the consequences of large-scale civilian displacement.  Read More »

Hunger in Sudan: Government Policy, Civilian Suffering

New IDP Arrivals at Um Baru, North Darfur (January 2015)

Hunger and food insecurity have been far too common in Sudan. As severe drought and famine swept through East Africa in the 1980s, the Sudanese acutely felt the effects of these deprivations. Darfur, in particular, was one of the most drought-affected regions. About 20 years later, at least 180,000 Sudanese died from hunger and related disease during the Darfur genocide in 2003 and 2004.  Read More »

Joseph Kony and the Lord's Resistance Army Added by U.S., U.N. to Additional Sanctions Designations Lists

Photo: Lord's Resistance Army leader Joseph Kony (AP)

This week, the U.S. Government and the U.N. Security Council (UNSC) took additional positive steps to ensure Joseph Kony and the Lord's Resistance Army (LRA) are subject to U.S. and multilateral sanctions.    Read More »

International Women’s Day 2016: A Celebration of Congo’s Changemakers

To mark International Women’s Day 2016, the Enough Project is highlighting women in Congo who are working towards peace, security, and accountability for their communities and their country.

World Wildlife Day 2016: Blood Ivory - The Elephant in the Room

Thursday, March 3rd 2016 is World Wildlife Day. This year, the theme centers on protection of elephants in particular. Recognizing the links between wildlife trafficking and the perpetration of atrocities in central and eastern Africa, Enough is calling on U.S. Congress to pass critical anti-wildlife trafficking legislation.  Read More »

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