Enough Said

Caught in the Crossfire: Child Soldiers in South Sudan Have Few Alternatives

Youth have been key fighters in South Sudan’s various conflicts for decades, as depicted in the new feature film The Good Lie. As the country’s ongoing crisis unfolds, with little evidence of abatement, youth continue to suffer the consequences as both the victims and perpetrators of violence, with few alternatives for a better life.  Read More »

Think Progress Op-Ed: How War Criminals And Human Rights Violators Exploit U.S. Banks

Ill deeds on a mass scale require money – heaps of it. And for those who get their working capital through trafficking, pillage, and corruption comes the problem of where to stash their cash. For far too long, the American financial system and corporate structures have been exploited to enable the actions and transactions of the worst of the worst.  Read More »

Daily Beast Op-Ed: ‘The Good Lie’ and the Hard Truths of South Sudan

The Good Lie should be about the past. Unfortunately, a new war, rooted in the embers of the one that brought the Lost Boys and Girls to America, has engulfed South Sudan today.  Read More »

New Generation of Lost Girls at Risk in South Sudan

Sudan’s second civil war and U.S. humanitarian efforts elevated the “lost boys” to widespread recognition. But little attention has been paid to the “lost girls” of Sudan. As South Sudan plunges back into violent conflict, the risks girls face are mounting, including sexual and gender-based violence.  Read More »

Guest Review of The Good Lie

Katie-Jay Scott Stauring, Director of Operations and Community Involvement at i-ACT, wrote this piece following her attendance at the screening of The Good Lie at the Museum of Tolerance in Los Angeles.  Read More »

New Report on South Sudan: Spoils of War, Spoilers of Peace

Our latest publication on the crisis in South Sudan urges the international community to build economic leverage for peace by imposing consequences for the country’s warring elites who are undermining the peace process, committing atrocities, and obstructing humanitarian aid.  Read More »

Building a Movement: Students & Business Leaders Call for Greater Action on Conflict Minerals, Especially Gold

Cooperative efforts by student activists like Roxanne Rahnama and socially-conscious companies like Intel indicate a sustained and growing interest in the conflict-free movement and exemplify its cross-cutting nature.  Read More »

NGOs Release Joint Statement to Participants of UNGA’s Ministerial High-Level Meeting on South Sudan

On the Occasion of the September 25 Ministerial High-Level Meeting on South Sudan during the 69th Session of the United Nations General Assembly, 19 non-governmental organizations released released a joint statement on the conflict in South Sudan.  Read More »

Canada to Vote on Conflict Minerals Legislation, Should Join Support for Mining Reforms and Livelihood Projects in Congo

On September 24th, the Canadian House of Commons will hold a Second Reading vote on Bill C-486: The Conflict Minerals Act. Bills like C-486, Provision 1502 of the Dodd-Frank Act in the U.S., and legislation proposed by the Eurpoean Union indicate the growing global movement dedicated to eliminating the flow of conflict minerals. In addition to these positive steps, Canada, along with other important donor governments, must also step up their support for mining reform efforts and livelihood projects in Congo.  Read More »

Enough Supports Sudanese Activists Speaking Out On Government Crimes

In the past week, Sudanese activists have launched two dynamic campaigns that draw attention to their government's ongoing crimes and call on the international community to respond with decisive action. Both efforts showcase the energy and commitment of Sudanese activists to challenging their government's abuses. The Enough Project stands in solidarity with these brave activists and fully supports their call for change.   Read More »

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