Enough Said

In Memory of Gwen Ifill

On November 14th, 2016, the world lost Gwen Ifill, a groundbreaking journalist and longtime PBS news anchor and co-host of "PBS NewsHour" and moderator of “Washington Week in Review.”  Read More »

Jeune Afrique Op-ed: Conférences des bailleurs : des perfusions à fonds perdus pour la Centrafrique

Alors que Bruxelles s’apprête à recevoir jeudi 17 novembre une nouvelle conférence des bailleurs de fonds sur la République centrafricaine, de profondes incertitudes demeurent quant aux garanties offertes par le président Faustin-Archange Touadéra pour restaurer la paix.  Read More »

Enough's 5 Recommended Reads | Nov. 10

Enough's 5 Recommended Reads is a biweekly series featuring important stories you may have missed.   Read More »

In Memory of Katherine Fleming Yarges: Activist Extraordinaire and Heart of the Congo Activist Community

Katherine (second from left) at a Run for Congo Women event

For so many who came together as Congo activists, Katherine Fleming Yarges was a light—and a rock. Whether stepping up to Run for Congo Women, as one of A Thousand Sisters, taking on conflict minerals in the 45,000 penny campaign, or shooting protest selfies for Outcry for Congo or Special Envoy Now. Katherine was a steady, glowing presence that represented the very best of the Congo activist community.   Read More »

November 2 Marks the International Day to End Impunity for Crimes Against Journalists

Today, the UN marks the International Day to End Impunity for Crimes against Journalists, condemning all attacks and violence against media workers and urging member states to do their utmost to prevent violence against journalists.  Read More »

New Comprehensive Study - "A Criminal State: Understanding and Countering Institutionalized Corruption and Violence in Congo"

Enough's new comprehensive study reveals how the Democratic Republic of Congo is not a failed state—for everyone. It is a failure for the vast majority of Congolese who suffer from abysmal security, healthcare, and education services. However, it is an efficient state for ruling elites and their commercial partners who seek to extract or traffic resources at the expense of Congo’s development. Over the past 130 years, Congo has had many elements of violent kleptocracy, a system of state capture in which ruling networks and commercial partners hijack governing institutions and maintain impunity for the purpose of resource extraction and for the security of the regime. Violence has been the systemic companion of these regimes.  This study argues that President Kabila and his close associates rely in large part on theft, violence, and impunity to stay in power at the expense of the country’s development. If international policymakers are to have a real impact in helping Congolese reformers actually reform the system, they need to shift the lens through which they view the conflict.  Read More »

Daily Maverick Op-ed: Sudan – Real and Imagined

There are two Sudans: one real and one imagined. In the imaginary Sudan, President Omar al-Bashir’s government is leading a meaningful National Dialogue that will address grievances, reconcile differences, and eventually lead to a democratic state. In this fictitious Sudan, the Sudan Armed Forces fight a just war against unappeasable rebels in the country’s south, while instability and violent conflict are largely a thing of the past in Darfur.  Read More »

Defining Violent Kleptocracy in East and Central Africa, by Ken Menkhaus and John Prendergast

In several recent publications and Congressional hearings, the Enough Project has used the term “violent kleptocracy” to describe the nature of the principal systems in place in our organization’s focus countries: Sudan, South Sudan, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the Central African Republic, and Somalia. Although the details and structure of the violent kleptocracy may differ in each country, the results are similar: conflict, death, impunity, democratic deficit, and wide-scale looting of state assets.  Read More »

President Obama Signs Anti-Wildlife Trafficking Legislation into Law

On October 7, 2016, H.R. 2494, the Eliminate, Neutralize, and Disrupt Wildlife Trafficking Act of 2016 was signed into law by President Obama. This law will support the protection of elephants, rhinos, and other endangered species from a from a sophisticated international poaching and trafficking trade that is decimating animal populations worldwide and funding armed groups.  Read More »

New Report - “Bankrupting Kleptocracy: Financial Tools to Counter Atrocities in Africa’s Deadliest War Zones”

Enough’s latest report describes how several conflict-affected countries in East and Central Africa have been hijacked, and how the U.S. government can use three potent financial tools of pressure as part of an overall strategy to counter mass atrocities in these countries.  Read More »

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