Enough Said

New Brief: Addressing South Sudan’s Economic and Fiscal Crisis

As conditions for ordinary South Sudanese people continue to deteriorate, government mismanagement is combining with economic and political crises to create a “toxic situation,” according to a newly released Enough Project brief. The brief, Addressing South Sudan’s Economic and Fiscal Crisis, calls for action by the international community, and also for commitment by the warring parties to put the needs of the people ahead of their own.  Read More »

Boom Town: What happened when Wall Street reform came to Congo’s frontier mining towns

Rubaya town, Democratic Republic of the Congo. Photo: Holly Dranginis / Enough P

On February 11, Enough published a new piece on the impact Dodd-Frank Section 1502 has had on some of Congo's mining communities, based on field interviews from a recent trip to eastern Congo.  Read More »

Advocates Take Action in D.C. for 2nd Lemkin Summit

From January 30-February 1, approximately 140 activists and student leaders in the anti-atrocity movement came to D.C. to network with one another, develop their advocacy skills, and engage with experts on new approaches and non-traditional tools to end and prevent mass atrocities in places such as the Central African Republic, the Democratic Republic of Congo, South Sudan, and Sudan.

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Bishop Criticizes Intolerance for Free Speech in South Sudan

In a homily delivered this month, Auxiliary Bishop Santo Laku Pio of the Catholic Archdiocese of Juba said there is increasing intolerance for speaking out against atrocities meted out on civilians in South Sudan. The bishop’s statement underscores a growing repression of free expression in South Sudan.  Read More »

Russia Blocks U.N. Security Council Action on Conflict-Affected Gold in Darfur

In the UN Security Council, Russia blocked U.S. and U.K. efforts to address conflict-affected gold in Darfur. Russia’s blocking action came despite findings from the Sudan Sanctions Committee’s Panel of Experts that link illegal exploitation and trafficking of gold and other minerals to violence and instability in Darfur.  Read More »

Civil War Depletes South Sudan’s Elephant Population

In South Sudan’s two-year old civil war, oil was a key factor in fueling the war economy. But reports are emerging that elephants may have contributed to this war economy. As reported last week by Bloomberg News, South Sudan's wildlife service says at least 500 elephants were killed during the fighting over the past two years.  Read More »

Sen. Markey urges strong U.S. policy, including targeted sanctions, in support of timely, free, and fair Congolese Elections

On Thursday, February 4, Senator Ed Markey (D-MA) sent a letter to Secretary of State John Kerry, expressing deep concern over, and urging strong action in response to, delayed Presidential elections in the Democratic Republic of Congo (Congo).  Read More »

St. Louis Post-Dispatch Op-ed: Voices for War and Peace in South Sudan

Alice (not her real name) was living in Juba, the capital of South Sudan, when war erupted in December 2013. As soldiers went from house to house shooting anyone they found, she witnessed the killing of seven of her relatives and her pastor. Her pastor had been gathering people together to try to protect them. But when the soldiers found him, they shot him and poured beer on him.  Read More »

The Dominic Ongwen Trial

Dominic Ongwen

This week marks an important step forward for international justice and accountability for atrocities in East and Central Africa. The International Court completed its confirmation of charges hearings in the case of Dominic Ongwen, a former commander of the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA).  Read More »

Corruption Continues in Sudan’s Oil Sector

A new report from Sudan Democracy First Group shows how systemic corruption in Sudan’s oil sector continues even after the oil boom has ended. This report also shows how pervasive corruption undermines openness and transparency and allows a small circle of political elites to amass great personal wealth through undue influence and patronage.  Read More »

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