Enough Said

Sexual Violence: Survivors Reclaiming Communities

This is the second in a blog series about issues currently perpetuating the conflict in the Democratic Republic of Congo, including the conflict minerals trade, sexual violence, and child soldier recruitment. Although many Congolese are facing incredibly difficult situations, there are local civil society groups taking action and creating avenues for sustainable peace. In this blog series, I will discuss each issue and give examples of organizations making positive changes.  Read More »

Congo’s Minerals: From Conflict to Community Benefit

This is the first in a blog series about issues currently perpetuating the conflict in the Democratic Republic of Congo, including the conflict minerals trade, sexual violence, and child soldier recruitment. Although many Congolese are facing incredibly difficult situations, there are local civil society groups taking action and creating avenues for sustainable peace. In this blog series, I will discuss each issue and give examples of organizations making positive changes.  Read More »

MSNBC Op-Ed: How John Kerry could help bring peace to Congo

The last time two Americans of this prominence traveled to Congo (then Zaire), it was for the boxing match of the century: the Rumble in the Jungle between George Foreman and Muhammad Ali.   Read More »

Enough Project's Kasper Agger Testifies at House Hearing on CAR

On May 1, 2014, Enough Project Field Researcher Kasper Agger testified before the the U.S. House Committee on Foreign Affairs, Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights, and International Organizations, which convened to hear experts from the State Department and NGOs discuss "The Central African Republic: From 'Pre-genocide' to genocide?."  Read More »

Enough Project Analyzes Natural Resources and Armed Groups Fueling Violence in CAR

Since December 2013, the Central African Republic (CAR) has experienced extreme instability and violence, resulting in the death of at least 2,000 people, roughly 643,000 internally displaced persons, and an additional 100,000 refugees to the more than 200,000 that were already living in neighboring countries.   Read More »

Minnesota Lawyers Support Conflict-Free Initiative

On April 25, 2014, the Minnesota State Bar Association (“MSBA”) became the first Bar Association in the nation to adopt a conflict-free policy.  Read More »

Daily Beast Op-Ed: Preventing Genocide in South Sudan

Twenty years after Rwanda’s genocide, the world’s newest state—not Syria or Darfur—is the region most in danger of mass exterminations along ethnic lines.  Read More »

Discuss, Engage, Act: Massachusetts Activists Engage on Three Key Initiatives for Peace in the Congo

Nonprofit groups and campus organizations throughout Massachusetts recently united at Boston University for a conference with three key goals: Elevate the conversation on the Congo within our communities; Reinvigorate our civic engagement on policies that can help bring an end to the conflict in Congo; and Commit our campuses to the conflict-free movement.   Read More »

Statement by the Enough Project and Coalition Partners on the Violence in South Sudan

The Enough Project and coalition partners released an urgent statement in response to vicious attacks against civilians in South Sudan, including the recent attacks in Bentiu and Bor. The conflict threatens to destabilize the entire region and requires the immediate attention of the international community to stop the killing. This statement calls on both sides of the conflict and the international community to work towards engaging in peace and providing humanitarian assistance.  Read More »

Questions Remain in The Death of Rebel Leader Morgan

Paul Sadala, aka. Morgan, leader of the Congolese militia Mai Mai Morgan

Paul Sadala, aka. Morgan, leader of the Congolese militia Mai Mai Morgan, was killed last week on April 14, two days after he surrendered with 42 members of his militia. It is still unclear why Morgan, who was alleged to engage in sexual violence, gold pillaging, and ivory poaching, surrendered in the first place. Here we provide an in depth look into his death.  Read More »

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