Blog Posts in Conflict Minerals

Posted by Annie Callaway on May 12, 2016

The Conflict-Free Campus Initiative (CFCI), a joint initiative of the Enough Project and STAND, draws on the power of student leadership and activism to support peace in the Democratic Republic of Congo. By encouraging school officials and stakeholders, both of which are large purchasers of electronics and powerful spokespersons, to commit to measures that pressure electronics companies to invest responsibly in Congo's minerals sector, students are voicing the demand for conflict-free products from Congo. As a Campus Organizer for CFCI, you will be an essential part of strengthening the conflict-free movement on your campus. APPLY NOW!

Posted by Enough Team on May 10, 2016

National and international civil society organisations working to advance transparency and accountability in supply chains welcome this 10th Joint Forum on Responsible Mineral Supply Chains. The Forum represents a commitment by governments and companies to engage in more responsible sourcing and trading in line with applicable laws and standards, such as the United Nations Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights (UNGPs).

Posted by Enough Team on Feb 22, 2016
Photo: Erberto Zani / www.erbertozani.com

In a new Enough Project report based on 2015 and 2016 field research in eastern Congo, Senior Policy Analyst Holly Dranginis provides a status update on the impact of Dodd-Frank 1502 in Congo, including progress, challenges, and policy recommendations for continued improvements.

Posted by Holly Dranginis on Feb 12, 2016
Rubaya town, Democratic Republic of the Congo. Photo: Holly Dranginis / Enough P

On February 11, Enough published a new piece on the impact Dodd-Frank Section 1502 has had on some of Congo's mining communities, based on field interviews from a recent trip to eastern Congo.

Posted by Enough Team on Oct 6, 2015

In a promising development, on Friday, October 2 the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and Amnesty International both filed petitions for a review of the most recent court decision on the SEC’s Conflict Minerals Rule.