Blog Posts in Conflict Minerals

Posted by Enough Team on Feb 16, 2017
Tin ore

The conflict-free minerals trade has been slowly but steadily increasing in recent years, and 2016 resulted in record-high exports from the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo once again. The North Kivu province, the most 3T-rich minerals province in Congo, exported record-high conflict-free export numbers for both tin and tantalum in 2016. This counters the claims that Dodd-Frank 1502, often referred to as the conflict minerals law, is leading to a de facto embargo on eastern Congo’s minerals.

Posted by Enough Team on Feb 14, 2017

This Valentine’s Day the Enough Project is excited to announce we will once again be ranking leading companies on their efforts to source conflict-free minerals from Congo. With the Dodd-Frank 1502 conflict minerals law under increasing threat of being repealed or weakened, this consumer holiday is the perfect time to let companies know we expect a strong commitment to conflict-free sourcing.

Posted by Enough Team on Feb 8, 2017

On February 6th, Elm Sustainability Partners, an independent advisory firm, published detailed information demonstrating that implementation costs related to federal conflict minerals reporting requirements for businesses have been substantially lower than expected and U.S. companies have in fact seen “tangible business benefits.”

Posted by Enough Team on Oct 27, 2016

Enough's new comprehensive study reveals how the Democratic Republic of Congo is not a failed state—for everyone. It is a failure for the vast majority of Congolese who suffer from abysmal security, healthcare, and education services. However, it is an efficient state for ruling elites and their commercial partners who seek to extract or traffic resources at the expense of Congo’s development. Over the past 130 years, Congo has had many elements of violent kleptocracy, a system of state capture in which ruling networks and commercial partners hijack governing institutions and maintain impunity for the purpose of resource extraction and for the security of the regime. Violence has been the systemic companion of these regimes.  This study argues that President Kabila and his close associates rely in large part on theft, violence, and impunity to stay in power at the expense of the country’s development. If international policymakers are to have a real impact in helping Congolese reformers actually reform the system, they need to shift the lens through which they view the conflict.

Posted by Enough Team on Jun 2, 2016

Elm Sustainbaility Partners LLC has been tracking the 2016 SEC conflict minerals reports.