Blog Posts in Genocide

Posted by Enough Team on Feb 22, 2016

On February 11, the Senators Cardin (D-MD) and Tillis (R-NC), along with thirteen other Senators, introduced the Genocide and Atrocities Prevention Act of 2016, S. 2551. This legislation aims to help prevent acts of genocide and mass atrocities, which threaten national and international security, by enhancing United States civilian capacities to prevent and mitigate such crises.

Posted by Enough Team on Oct 8, 2015
STAND

STAND, a student-led movement that aims to end mass atrocities, has recently launched the #EasyAsAPB campaign in support of the Atrocities Prevention Board (APB).

Posted by Enough Team on Mar 24, 2015
Credit: Holly Dranginis/Enough Project

In recognition of one of the newest universal human rights, March 24 was proclaimed in 2010 to be the International Day for the Right to the Truth concerning Gross Human Rights Violations and for the Dignity of Victims. First litigated in a case against Ecuador for failing to provide truth and justice for the family of a victim, the understanding of the right to truth has expanded over time as belonging not only to members of victims’ families, but to all members of society. While not a substitute for justice, truth is essential to ensuring lasting peace in conflict-affected communities.

Posted by Akshaya Kumar on Sep 15, 2014

Ten years ago this week, then-Secretary of State Colin Powell declared that genocide had been committed in Darfur and that the government of Sudan and the janjaweed bore responsibility for those acts. Even though it did not actually trigger a legal obligation to act, many hoped that using the "g word" meant that the United States was crossing the Rubicon and committing itself to stopping the violence in Darfur, Sudan's most troubled region. The janjaweed, however, are still at large in Darfur -- and with the Sudanese government's help, they are now arguably more powerful than ever.

Posted by Enough Team on Jun 26, 2014
UNAMID

A new Enough Project report traces the movement and atrocities of Sudan's Rapid Support Forces (RSF), a new iteration of the Janjaweed militias. The RSF are an upgraded version of the Janjaweed that the world came to fear in Darfur ten years ago, but are better equipped, centrally commanded, and fully integrated into the Sudanese government’s security structures.