Blog Posts in Justice and Accountability

Posted by Enough Team on Apr 1, 2015

Yesterday, in an historic election, Nigeria had its first peaceful and democratic power transfer. This month, Africa will see another election, in President Omar al Bashir's Sudan. Unfortunately, there, elections don't necessarily mean choice. Given current restrictions on civil society organizations, some fear that if the elections proceed on April 13th, they will only intensify the conflict and worsen the humanitarian crisis in Sudan.

Posted by Enough Team on Mar 24, 2015
Credit: Holly Dranginis/Enough Project

In recognition of one of the newest universal human rights, March 24 was proclaimed in 2010 to be the International Day for the Right to the Truth concerning Gross Human Rights Violations and for the Dignity of Victims. First litigated in a case against Ecuador for failing to provide truth and justice for the family of a victim, the understanding of the right to truth has expanded over time as belonging not only to members of victims’ families, but to all members of society. While not a substitute for justice, truth is essential to ensuring lasting peace in conflict-affected communities.

Posted by Akshaya Kumar on Mar 24, 2015

In this 101, Sudan and South Sudan Policy Analyst Akshaya Kumar answers 5 questions about the GHRAVITY Executive Order (Grave Human Rights Abuses by the Governments of Iran and Syria Via Information Technology) and how it can be expanded to allow the U.S. to target the middle men and enablers of atrocities in Sudan.

Posted by Travis Roberts on Mar 19, 2015

Editor's Note: The letter below, from a coalition of experts and NGOs including the Enough Project, was released recently. The letter, directed at Secretary of State John Kerry, supports the U.S. Government's ongoing efforts to promote free and fair elections in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and proposes specific steps for enhancing engagement.

Posted by Travis Roberts on Jan 22, 2015
M23 rebel fighters north of Goma, DRC (2012) AP Photo/Jerome Delay

In Enough Project Policy Analyst Holly Dranginis’ latest report, Grand Theft Global: Prosecuting the War Crime of Natural Resource Pillage in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Dranginis provides an inside look at why the widespread theft of minerals in Congo has gone on unpunished, and how policymakers and legal practitioners can help advance cases.  Grand Theft Global is the result of research in Congo, The Hague, and Washington, DC, including dozens of interviews with Congolese attorneys, international prosecutors, and local communities affected by pillage and the violence it enables.