Blog Posts in Publication Announcements

Posted by Enough Team on Aug 25, 2015

The U.S. Special Envoy to Sudan and South Sudan, Ambassador Donald Booth, is traveling to Khartoum, Sudan this week. Today, the Enough Project released a statement to the Special Envoy encouraging him and the U.S. government to use this trip to enhance U.S. policy on Sudan by employing a much broader strategy of financial pressure to target the individuals and entities that profit from corruption and illicit financial activities and benefit from ongoing conflict.

Posted by Enough Team on Aug 12, 2015

August 17 is the deadline set for South Sudan's warring parties to reach a final political settlement to end their country's twenty-month civil war. Today, 5 days until the deadline, the Enough Project released a new brief outlining the 7 key elements for an effective Plan B.

Posted by Enough Team on Jul 27, 2015

The Sentry released its first report, The Nexus of Corruption and Conflict in South Sudan, which maps out the corruption and the conflict-financing system in South Sudan and describes the likely channeling of illicit money flows.

Posted by Enough Team on Jul 23, 2015

As President Obama leaves for Africa today, the Enough Project is releasing its latest policy brief, Creating a Cost for Those Destroying South Sudan, which makes specific recommendations for tackling corruption and conflict financing in South Sudan.

Posted by Enough Team on Apr 30, 2015

A trade in illegally mined and smuggled “conflict gold” is fueling both high-level military corruption and violent rebel groups in eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), according to a new report by the Enough Project. “Congo’s Conflict Gold Rush: Bringing gold into the legal trade in the Democratic Republic of Congo,” by the Enough Project’s Fidel Bafilemba and Sasha Lezhnev, offers an in-depth portrait of the conflict gold supply chain, from muddy artisanal mines where gold is dug out with shovels and pick-axes, through illicit transport routes in Uganda, Burundi, and Dubai. Based on seven months of field research at mines and in regional capitals, the report provides an in-depth discussion of solutions to the conflict gold supply chain. The U.S. government, European Union, jewelers, socially responsible investors, the World Bank, and activists all have important roles to play.