Blog Posts in Publication Announcements

Posted by Mollie Zapata on May 7, 2013
Broken Agreements

A new report from the Satellite Sentinel Project, or SSP, confirms that Sudan and South Sudan have violated recent peace agreements by positioning troops in what is supposed to be a 12-mile (20-kilometer) demilitarized buffer zone along their contested border. Neither the joint border-verification mechanism established by both countries, nor the United Nations peacekeeping mission tasked with monitoring the demilitarized buffer zone has detected these violations.

Posted by Kasper Agger on Nov 9, 2012

Based on research conducted while embedded with the Ugandan army, Enough is publishing today a field dispatch titled, “Chasing the Lord’s Resistance Army - Challenges faced by Ugandan soldiers pursuing the Lord’s Resistance Army.” The dispatch explains that the UPDF trekking teams can roam around in the jungle for weeks without any clear trace of the LRA and that direct encounters are rare.

Posted by Patricia Garrity on Nov 7, 2012

Following the resolution of negotiations in Addis Ababa this September, the international community watches on as the Republic of Sudan and the Republic of South Sudan continue to grapple with critical outstanding issues. In the coming days, the U.N. Security Council will have the opportunity to vote on a set of recommendations from the African Union Peace and Security Council, or A.U. PSC, on a way forward, so the Enough Project makes some recommendations for the Security Council’s engagement in a new policy brief released today.

Posted by Mollie Zapata on Oct 31, 2012

The Satellite Sentinel Project acquired imagery of the explosion that rocked Khartoum, the capital of Sudan, just after midnight on October 24, 2012. Though the source of the explosion and fire were not immediately apparent, expert analysis of DigitalGlobe satellite imagery shows evidence to indicate that the explosions were in fact the result of aerial bombardment.

Posted by Carine Umuhumuza on Oct 25, 2012

The conflict-gold rush is thriving in eastern Congo. Recent U.S. legislation and supply-chain pressure from tech companies has made it difficult for armed groups in the region to sell the 3-T minerals—tin, tantalum, and tungsten—and as a result, rebels and army commanders have increasingly turned to gold. In a report released today, the Enough Project looks at the illegal conflict-gold trade in eastern Congo that is fueling one of the most violent conflicts in the world.