Blog Posts in Raise Hope for Congo

Posted by Enough Team on Dec 17, 2014

Since early October, Beni territory in eastern Congo has suffered a series of horrific attacks, allegedly perpetrated by the Allied Democratic Forces (ADF). The violence, often targeting women and children, has resulted in the deaths of more that 250 civilians. As the attacks continued unabated, tensions between the local postulations and UN and Congolese forces have increased.

Posted by Annie Callaway on Nov 13, 2014

On May 20th, 2014, the California Polytechnic State University (Cal Poly) Academic Senate passed a conflict minerals resolution, making Cal Poly the 17th school to go conflict-free. The official statement, recently published on the University's Office of Contracts, Procurement, and Risk Management website, acknowledges the problem of conflict minerals, resolves to take into account whether companies are working to address the problem when making purchasing decisions for the University, calls upon the entire California State University system to adopt similar practices.

Posted by Enough Team on Nov 10, 2014

The plight of women and children in eastern Congo has not received the urgent response it needs, which has facilitated widespread impunity. This culture of impunity allows perpetrators to continue their violations against vulnerable civilians. Sanctions on such perpetrators help combat the culture of impunity by holding the guilty accountable, allowing the survivors and their communities the opportunity to move forward and sending a clear message that violence against women and children will not be tolerated.

Posted by Enough Team on Oct 30, 2014

This resource page is designed to provide an update on the efforts to end the conflict minerals trade that finances numerous brutal armed groups in eastern Congo, note remaining challenges, and suggest strategies for encouraging lasting peace.

Posted by Annie Callaway on Sep 25, 2014

Cooperative efforts by student activists like Roxanne Rahnama and socially-conscious companies like Intel indicate a sustained and growing interest in the conflict-free movement and exemplify its cross-cutting nature.