Blog Posts in Raise Hope for Congo

Posted by Sasha Lezhnev on Feb 14, 2014

Three and a half years ago, Enough and Campus Progress (now known as Generation Progress) protested the opening of Apple’s  prestigious new store in Georgetown, Washington, DC because it was lagging behind other companies on combating the trade in conflict minerals from eastern Congo. Today, such a protest would be unnecessary. Apple released its annual Supplier Responsibility report yesterday, and the company is making some significant strides on conflict minerals.

Posted by JD Stier on Feb 14, 2014
Three Little Words . . . Congo Conflict Free

Here we are again, that time of year where love is officially celebrated between family, friends, lovers, crushes and colleagues. Valentine's Day. Honestly, we both look forward to this holiday. What's not to love? Valentine's Day is the holiday for love, but the gold so many people give each other as a symbol of their love may be fueling violent conflict in the Democratic Republic of Congo. The silver lining: we can do quite a bit as consumers to help our jewelry companies address conflict gold.

Posted by Enough Team on Feb 11, 2014
#congopeace Instagram submission

On March 6, the Enough Project’s Raise Hope for Congo campaign is partnering with the United Nations for an event to raise awareness about sexual violence in conflict and how it intersects with inarmed conflict, peace building, and conflict minerals trade.

Posted by Timo Mueller on Feb 5, 2014
FARDC soldiers on patrol in eastern Congo

In early November, the Congolese army, supported by the United Nations Force Intervention Brigade, defeated the most powerful rebel group in eastern Congo - the M23.

Posted by Enough Team on Jan 31, 2014
Gold in a tin (Sasha Lezhnev/Enough Project)

This week, the Conflict-Free Sourcing Initiative, or CFSI, an initiative on conflict minerals of the tech industry association the Electronic Industry Citizenship Coalition, or EICC, announced that, for the first time, there are now audited conflict-free smelters or refiners for the four identified conflict minerals: tin, tungsten, tantalum, and gold.