Blog Posts in Satellite Sentinel Project

Posted by Enough Team on Jan 13, 2014
Satellite imagery secured on January 10 shows extensive destruction of huts, or

For the past month, South Sudan has been engulfed in an expanding civil war. The United Nations estimates that over 395,000 people have been displaced by violence, 352,000 internally, of which 60,000 have sought shelter at U.N. compounds around the country. The Satellite Sentinel Project has just released a new report, that augments existing reporting on South Sudan's civil war with satellite imagery of Mayom and Bor, captured from 300 miles above the earth.

Posted by Enough Team on Jan 10, 2014
George Clooney and Hans Zimmer

The Enough Project is partnering with Omaze and Not on Our Watch in an exciting initiative giving individuals a chance to enter a raffle to win one of two once-in-a-lifetime experiences: spend the evening and walk down the red carpet with George Clooney and join award-winning composer Hans Zimmer in the final studio scoring session for The Amazing Spider-Man 2. 

Posted by Katrien Hinderdael on Jan 9, 2014

Earlier today, the U.S. Senate Committee on Foreign Relations convened to hear testimony from panel experts and discuss the role of the United States in the, “Situation in South Sudan.”

Posted by Enough Team on Jan 8, 2014
Displaced civilians prepare to sleep in the open at night in the town of Awerial

The New York Times' Room for Debate posed the question: Given the critical role the United States and other foreign entities played in the creation of South Sudan, what is their responsibility as the region faces another civil war? Six panelists weigh in. 

Posted by Rachel Finn on Dec 18, 2013

On December 15, violent clashes erupted on the streets of Juba, South Sudan’s capital city. While the details surrounding the spark of the violence are unclear, it is already apparent that these clashes have the potential to destabilize the entire country.  Despite the operational constraints posed by the U.S. embassy’s evacuation of all non-essential staff, the United States government can and must do more to help avert a return to civil war in South Sudan. In an open memorandum the Enough Project outlines possible steps the U.S. could take in addition to what is presently being done.