Blog Posts in Sudan and South Sudan

Posted by Enough Team on May 24, 2016

Today, the Enough Project released its latest policy brief by Founding Director John Prendergast, “The Paper Tiger in South Sudan: Threats without Consequences for Atrocities and Kleptocracy”. Based on Prendergast’s testimony before a hearing in Congress last month, the brief outlines how the primary root cause for the atrocities and instability that mark South Sudan’s short history is that its government quickly morphed into a violent kleptocracy.

Posted by Enough Team on May 11, 2016

On Thursday, April 28, 2016, the Enough Project held a panel discussion on Capitol Hill focused on Sudan and the sanctions debate surrounding that country’s ruling regime. “A New Approach to Sudan” featured a number of speakers from various backgrounds in both the government and non-government sectors.

Posted by Rachel Finn on May 4, 2016
Rep. Jim McGovern (D-MA)

On Wednesday, May 4, 120 bispartisan Members of Congress sent a letter to President Obama, urging him to keep Sudan a priority in the final months of his Administration.

Posted by Rachel Finn on May 3, 2016
John Prendergast testifying on April 27, 2016

On Wednesday April 27, Enough Project Founding Director John Prendergast testified before the House Foreign Affairs Committee, Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights, and International Organizations for a hearing entitled “South Sudan’s Prospects for Peace and Security.”

Posted by Enough Team on Apr 28, 2016

Although Darfur’s atrocities are widely perceived to be a thing of the past, the UN announced in the last week that 138,000 Darfuris have been displaced by conflict since the beginning of the year, joining over four million Sudanese already displaced by ongoing wars in Darfur, Blue Nile, and South Kordofan states. Sudan’s conflicts have produced the third highest prevalence of malnutrition globally, and European governments are so concerned about the influx of Sudanese refugees into Europe that the European Union last week donated $100 million to projects aimed at staunching the flow of those refugees.