Blog Posts in Sudan and South Sudan

Posted by Enough Team on Apr 12, 2016

A new report from the United States-based, Africa-focussed Enough Project proposes that President Barack Obama's government should use a similar range of finely tuned financial and technical sanctions against Sudan to that used against Iran to push it into serious negotiations.

Posted by Enough Team on Apr 12, 2016

Last week, the U.N. Security Council’s Panel of Experts on Sudan raised serious concerns over gold smuggling in Darfur. The panel presented its annual report to the Sudan Sanctions Committee in December 2015, but the publication of this report remains blocked due to objections from Russia. Russian Deputy Ambassador Petr Iliichev stated that the panel’s mandate does not include the monitoring of natural resources, noting, “the experts are not behaving like they are required to.” Further, the Russian government declared that it would only allow the publication of the report once the “most controversial paragraphs are edited out,” as it claims that the report is biased and based on speculation.

Posted by Enough Team on Apr 6, 2016

The Enough Project released its latest report, “Modernized Sanctions for Sudan: Unfinished Business for the Obama Administration,” outlining a new strategy that the United States must take towards Sudan. The approach recognizes the current unprecedented opportunity to build on emerging leverage with the Sudanese government and deploy new targeted financial pressures to support a peace deal in Sudan.

Posted by John Hursh on Mar 17, 2016

Earlier this week, South Africa’s Supreme Court of Appeal (SCA) rejected the government’s appeal of a lower court decision over its failure to arrest suspected international criminal and Sudan President Omar al-Bashir. Bashir traveled to South Africa last June to attend an African Union (AU) summit. The lower court held that the government violated South African law by allowing Bashir to leave the country before a court could rule on whether South African officials should arrest him due to his two outstanding International Criminal Court (ICC) arrest warrants.

Posted by Enough Team on Mar 17, 2016

In a riveting dispatch for the New York Times from South Sudan "Where the Soldiers Are Scarier Than the Crocodiles", Nicholas Kristof documents the terror and struggles of people who have sought refuge from war, hiding with their families in swamps and marshy islands to escape attacks by soldiers. Kristof says no solutions are ideal, but calls for "an arms embargo and sanctions aimed at the assets of individuals on each side of the civil war. Make leaders pay a price for intransigence, instead of profiting from it."