Blog Posts in Sudan and South Sudan

Posted by Nicole Audette on Mar 14, 2014

In recent weeks, inter-communal violence has engulfed Sudan's disputed Abyei region. Escalating tensions between Abyei's Ngok Dinka community and the nomadic Misseriya group, which are fueled by the area's unresolved status, have been exacerbated by the internal conflict in South Sudan, which has caused some to fear that Abyei has fallen from the South Sudanese political agenda. A new policy alert by the Enough Project warns of the potentially devastating consequences of this dichotomy of escalating conflict and limited attention by external actors. If a concerted commitment to resolving Abyei’s final status is not undertaken by the two governments and the international community, these clashes between Abyei's communities may spiral into a regionalized war.

Posted by John Prendergast on Mar 13, 2014

As a new wave of violent conflicts has ravaged Africa, borders and conventional peace processes have done little to contain them.

Posted by Enough Team on Mar 13, 2014

In recent weeks, South Sudanese civil society organizations have taken a public stand demanding more action against the atrocities being committed in their country. Although the AU Peace and Security Council (AUPSC) called for the creation of an AU-led Commission of Inquiry in December 2013, the appointment of members was stalled until the first week of March 2014.

Posted by Enough Team on Mar 13, 2014

Sudanese police forces fired tear gas at over 1,000 mourners at the funeral procession on Wednesday, March 13, of a Junior University of Khartoum Economics major student who was killed by government forces on Tuesday, March 12. Ali Abakar Musa’s death heralded a new bout of protests marked by the new shoot-to-kill policies utilized by government forces to quell protests on the deteriorating humanitarian situation in Sudan and the renewed crisis in Darfur.  Protesters marched in fury chanting slogans that ranged from “the killing of a student, the killing of a nation” and for the “downfall of the regime” while avenging the death of a student and calling for a new revolution against Bashir’s ruling regime. 

Posted by Enough Team on Mar 12, 2014
President Bashir of Sudan

Earlier this week, Dr. Mohamed Elgadi, an American citizen and Sudanese refugee, sent a passionate letter to President Obama describing his experience as a victim of torture in Sudan.