Blog Posts in Sudan and South Sudan

Posted by Enough Team on Mar 15, 2016
Activists protest in front of the Embassy of Saudi Arabia in Washington, D.C.

On March 10, 2016, several Sudanese organizations and activists protested in front of the Embassy of Saudi Arabia in Washington, D.C. expressing their concern over the Saudi government’s agreement to finance dam projects in Nubia. With proposals to build three dams along the Nile River, the benefit of enhanced hydroelectric power does not outweigh the destruction of one of the world’s richest archaeological sites and the consequences of large-scale civilian displacement.

Posted by John Hursh on Mar 11, 2016
New IDP Arrivals at Um Baru, North Darfur (January 2015)

Hunger and food insecurity have been far too common in Sudan. As severe drought and famine swept through East Africa in the 1980s, the Sudanese acutely felt the effects of these deprivations. Darfur, in particular, was one of the most drought-affected regions. About 20 years later, at least 180,000 Sudanese died from hunger and related disease during the Darfur genocide in 2003 and 2004.

Posted by Enough Team on Feb 24, 2016

Following the deaths of 18 civilians in a displaced people’s camp run by the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) in the city of Malakal on February 18, reporters are beginning to piece together details on the incident.

Posted by Sentry Team on Feb 22, 2016

Soon after South Sudan devalued its currency in December 2015, the central bank authorized the auction of U.S dollars to commercial banks to offset the cost of devaluation which had caused the South Sudanese pound to lose its value by 84 percent. Millions of dollars were auctioned to the commercial banks as a result of this move.

Posted by Enough Team on Feb 15, 2016

As conditions for ordinary South Sudanese people continue to deteriorate, government mismanagement is combining with economic and political crises to create a “toxic situation,” according to a newly released Enough Project brief. The brief, Addressing South Sudan’s Economic and Fiscal Crisis, calls for action by the international community, and also for commitment by the warring parties to put the needs of the people ahead of their own.