5 Stories You Might Have Missed This Week

 

Here at Enough, we often swap emails with interesting articles and feature stories that we come across in our favorite publications and on our favorite websites. We wanted to share some of these stories with you as part of our effort to keep you up to date on what you need to know in the world of anti-genocide and crimes against humanity work.

UNICEF released this short video “From memory to paper” about art therapy programs targeting traumatized children in camps for internally displaced people outside of Goma in eastern Congo.

With his retirement approaching, U.S. Special Envoy to Sudan and South Sudan Princeton Lyman gave an extended interview to Radio France International in which he reflects on the challenges of his time working on the Sudans during such a monumental moment in the two countries’ history.

New York Times reporter C.J. Chivers reveals how researchers retraced the trail of unmarked bullet casing from battlefields in Africa back to their origin in Iran.

The newly created Sudd Institute published a special report pinpointing the sources of conflict and insecurity in newly independent South Sudan. Written by Jok Madut Jok, co-founder and executive director of Sudd Institute, the piece examines long-standing challenges such as ethnic tension and “various liberation ideologies and factions”—the legacy of the long independence struggle—alongside more recent issues, such as urban crime, undisciplined security forces, and the targeting of foreign workers.

Analysts Robert Borthwick and James Warwick with the global risk advisory firm Maplecroft consider the challenges and opportunities created by the U.S. initiative to spark reform of the Congolese mining industry by increasing the demand for conflict-free minerals.

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