Akshaya Kumar's blog

Akshaya Kumar is the Sudan and South Sudan Policy Analyst for the Enough Project. Prior to coming to Enough, Akshaya was a Law Fellow at the Public International Law and Policy Group, or PILPG, where she served as a legal adviser to the government of the Republic of South Sudan. While at PILPG, Akshaya also supported the efforts of the Sudan Peoples Liberation Movement -North to secure humanitarian aid access for war-affected populations in South Kordofan and Blue Nile. Akshaya has previously worked in South Sudan as a population based researcher for UNHCR and the ILO and also spent time in Uganda working for a local access to justice organization. While in law school, Akshaya interned with the Office of the Prosecutor at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, UN Women and the International Committee of the Red Cross's legal delegation to the United Nations.
 
 Akshaya holds a J.D. from Columbia Law School, an LLM with distinction in Human Rights, Conflict, and Justice from the University of London's School of Oriental and African Studies and a B.A. from the George Washington University's Elliott School. Akshaya is originally from Chennai in South India and speaks Arabic, Hindi, Tamil, Spanish and French. She's passionate about gender sensitive transitional justice, promoting arts education for children, and collecting passport stamps.
 

Enough 101: The GHRAVITY Executive Order and Sudan

In this 101, Sudan and South Sudan Policy Analyst Akshaya Kumar answers 5 questions about the GHRAVITY Executive Order (Grave Human Rights Abuses by the Governments of Iran and Syria Via Information Technology) and how it can be expanded to allow the U.S. to target the middle men and enablers of atrocities in Sudan.  Read More »

ThinkProgress: 7 Things You Need To Know About The Changes To U.S. Sanctions On Sudan

Credit: AP

Editor's Note: This op-ed was written by Akshaya Kumar and originally appeared in ThinkProgress as "7 Things You Need To Know About The Changes To U.S. Sanctions On Sudan" on February 20, 2015.  Read More »

ThinkProgress: 7 Things You Need to Know About The Prayer Breakfast’s Second Most Controversial Guest

Ali Karti, Sudan’s foreign minister and primary diplomat, was invited to attend today's White House Prayer Breakfast, triggering protests from anti-genocide activists. In this ThinkProgress piece, Sudan and South Sudan Policy Analyst Akshaya Kumar answers 7 questions about Karti, the ongoing conflicts in Sudan, and the U.S. government's involvement in supporting peace in the country.  Read More »

CNN Op-Ed: At the UN, Janjaweed is a Dirty Word

Ten years ago this week, then-Secretary of State Colin Powell declared that genocide had been committed in Darfur and that the government of Sudan and the janjaweed bore responsibility for those acts. Even though it did not actually trigger a legal obligation to act, many hoped that using the "g word" meant that the United States was crossing the Rubicon and committing itself to stopping the violence in Darfur, Sudan's most troubled region. The janjaweed, however, are still at large in Darfur -- and with the Sudanese government's help, they are now arguably more powerful than ever.  Read More »

Calls for Targeted Sanctions Grow Louder As South Sudan's Leaders Miss #60DayDeadline

For the past two months, the Enough Project has been counting down to mediators' 60 day deadline to establish a transitional government of national unity for South Sudan. Now that the deadline has passed, a chorus of voices from across the globe have threatened South Sudan's leaders with punitive measures and targeted sanctions.   Read More »

Brazen Assault Caught on Camera As Security Council Debates Darfur Peacekeeping Mission

UN Photo/Albert González Farran

New photographs smuggled out of Darfur show uniformed Sudanese security forces brazenly assaulting Darfuris living in El Salam camp for the internally displaced. The camp, on the outskirts of Nyala in South Darfur, is host to tens of thousands who fled their homes due to violence. The recent assault was carried out last week under the pretense of a disarmament campaign. However, Abu Sharati, spokesman for the camp residents' association argues "the main objective of this attack is terrorising the camp population and dismantling the camp."  Read More »

Op-ed: Darfur, The Genocide America Forgot

Earlier this month, Sudan’s paramilitary Janjaweed forces razed 127 empty villages in Darfur to the ground. According to reports in local media, this was their second rampage over the same territory in as many months.   Read More »

7 Things You Need to Know About South Sudan's Agreement to End Hostilities

Displaced persons arrive in Bor, South Sudan (AP)

Today, South Sudan’s government and opposition forces signed a cessation of hostilities agreement in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Following weeks of intense mediated talks, this agreement is just the first step on South Sudan's long road to a durable peace.   Read More »

South Sudanese Diaspora Speak Out on Violence Back Home

South Sudanese Daniel Kojakole Pogo in the Netherlands.

On December 15, political infighting within South Sudan's ruling party mutated into an ugly and violent confrontation on the dusty streets of South Sudan's capital city.  Read More »

Al Jazeera America Op-ed: South Sudan’s Salva Kiir needs to put his black hat back on

As divisive violence rocks the world’s youngest nation, the U.S. has a role in averting civil war.  Read More »

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