Enough Team's blog

Margot Wallström is a former Member of Parliament, Cabinet Minister of Sweden and diplomat, who until recently held the post of United Nations Special Representative of the Secretary-General (SRSG) on Sexual Violence in Conflict. Prior to this, she served for ten years as European Commissioner: 1999-2004 as Environment Commissioner, and 2004-2010 as Vice President and Commissioner for Institutional Relations and Communication Strategy in the Barroso Commission. She is currently the chairman of Lund University in Sweden.

Human Rights Activist Launches Hunger Strike for South Sudan

On May 15, South Sudanese human rights activist Simon Deng began “a hunger strike for South Sudan”. In addition to fasting and protesting outside the White House for the past 6 days, Deng has released an open letter to President Barack Obama calling on the U.S. government to play a more active role in supporting peace in South Sudan.  Read More »

Celebrity with a Purpose: Actors Champion Enough's Work

Noeleen and Ruain

People spend as little as $10 for a chance to win unforgettable celebrity experiences that support our efforts to end mass atrocities in the Horn, central, and eastern Africa. Learn about two recent winners: one won a trip to Disneyland to join George Clooney for the premier of his new movie Tomorrowland, the other won an opportunity to have a power lunch with Robin Wright on the set of House of Cards.  Read More »

Growing Chorus Calling for UN Sanctions Enforcement in South Sudan

May 21, 2010 file photo of Riek Machar and Salva Kiir

Human Rights Watch releases dispatch urging immediate UN sanctions enforcement in South Sudan, echoing public calls made by the Enough Project and others.  Read More »

The Resolve and Invisible Children Release New LRA Crisis Tracker Report

LRA Crisis Tracker

The recently released report indicates that the LRA’s fighting capacity is dropping, and while killings are fewer, attacks and abductions have increased - in 2014, total LRA attacks rose 10% and abductions 32% compared to 2013.  Read More »

My Story: From Congo to the NFL

Andy Mulumba speaks at the Rally for Congo in Madison, WI

Green Bay Packers linebacker and Enough Project upstander Andy Mulumba writes about why he supports the Raise Hope for Congo campaign.  Read More »

Guest Op-Ed: The Senate must act fast to confirm Gayle Smith

In this May 5 op-ed that originally appeared in The Hill, senior fellow at the Center for American Progress Molly Elgin-Cossart urges the U.S. Senate to quickly confirm the President's appointment of Gayle Smith as Administrator of the U.S. Agency for International Development.  Read More »

My Night with Robin Wright

Robin Wright and student activists

In April 2015, CFCI Campus Organizer Corey Jones had the opportunity to attend an event at the University of Florida with actor and activist Robin Wright. In this post Corey reflects on the evening, the power of influence, and his work advocating for peace in Congo.  Read More »

Go to the World Premiere of Disney’s Tomorrowland with George Clooney

The Enough Project is partnering again with Omaze and Not on Our Watch giving individuals the chance to join George Clooney, co-founder of the Satellite Sentinel Project, at the Disneyland premiere of his new film, Tomorrowland.  Read More »

Enough Project Lauds Gayle Smith’s Nomination as USAID Administrator

The Enough Project commends the Obama administration’s decision to nominate Gayle Smith, co-founder of the Enough Project, to run USAID.  Read More »

New Congo Report: Congo’s Conflict Gold Rush and How to Counter it

A trade in illegally mined and smuggled “conflict gold” is fueling both high-level military corruption and violent rebel groups in eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), according to a new report by the Enough Project. “Congo’s Conflict Gold Rush: Bringing gold into the legal trade in the Democratic Republic of Congo,” by the Enough Project’s Fidel Bafilemba and Sasha Lezhnev, offers an in-depth portrait of the conflict gold supply chain, from muddy artisanal mines where gold is dug out with shovels and pick-axes, through illicit transport routes in Uganda, Burundi, and Dubai. Based on seven months of field research at mines and in regional capitals, the report provides an in-depth discussion of solutions to the conflict gold supply chain. The U.S. government, European Union, jewelers, socially responsible investors, the World Bank, and activists all have important roles to play.  Read More »

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