Enough Team's blog

Dr. Mukwege Responds to the DRC Government Banning "The Man Who Mends Women - The Wrath of Hippocrates"

Dr. Denis Mukwege

On September 3rd, Panzi Foundation published a statement from Dr. Denis Mukwege on the DRC Media Minister Ban of “The Man Who Mends Women - The Wrath of Hippocrates” documentary.  Read More »

African Arguments: The CAR’s Rushed Elections are a Dangerous Gamble

CAR’s rushed elections are a dangerous gamble

"The Central African Republic cannot afford to bet on its future for the sake of the international community’s need to show progress" write Kasper Agger and Christopher Day in this African Arguments piece on "the external push toward towards elections has left local leaders, armed groups, and ordinary Central Africans behind."  Read More »

Enough Project Statement on the Signing of the South Sudan Peace Agreement

The Enough Project welcomes the decision by the Government of South Sudan and President Salva Kiir to sign the compromise peace agreement, adding his signature to that of armed opposition leader Dr. Riek Machar and other stakeholders, to hopefully bring their country’s brutal civil war to an end.  Read More »

The Daily Beast Op-ed: Saving South Sudan From Kleptocracy

Saving South Sudan from Kleptocracy

South Sudan’s belligerents have signed a peace deal, but it is far from certain that the brutal 20-month civil war is over. If the next steps the parties take are simply to restore the status quo that existed before the war’s eruption, the odds are wildly in favor of a return to deadly conflict.  However, if the implementation of the agreement is seen as a chance to restart the construction of a viable state in the world’s newest country, dismantling the violent kleptocracy that it’s become since independence in 2011, then South Sudan has a chance for peace.  Read More »

Enough Project Statement on U.S. Special Envoy Booth’s Visit to Khartoum

The U.S. Special Envoy to Sudan and South Sudan, Ambassador Donald Booth, is traveling to Khartoum, Sudan this week. Today, the Enough Project released a statement to the Special Envoy encouraging him and the U.S. government to use this trip to enhance U.S. policy on Sudan by employing a much broader strategy of financial pressure to target the individuals and entities that profit from corruption and illicit financial activities and benefit from ongoing conflict.  Read More »

Packers News: Mulumba's Mission Comes Full Circle

In an article on packersnews.com Congolese NFL linebacker Andy Mulumba details his involvement with the Enough Project's Raise Hope for Congo Campaign.   Read More »

7 Things That Need To Be In An Effective Plan B for South Sudan

August 17 is the deadline set for South Sudan's warring parties to reach a final political settlement to end their country's twenty-month civil war. Today, 5 days until the deadline, the Enough Project released a new brief outlining the 7 key elements for an effective Plan B.  Read More »

Foreign Policy Op-ed: How to Destroy a War Economy

This op-ed originally appeared in Foreign Policy and was written by Enough Project Founding Director John Prendergast. He writes that to end the conflicts plaguing Africa, the United States needs to follow the money being made off of them — and stop it.  Read More »

Washington Post Editorial: South Sudan Destroyed from within by “Kleptocratic Regime”

The spectacle of failure in South Sudan is saddening. A nation that was brought to independence with the enthusiastic support of the United States, ending a long civil war, is now being torn apart by its own leaders. Millions in South Sudan are enduring hunger and disease. In the annals of nation-building experiments, this one may be remembered as ill-fated and short-lived. President Obama is now threatening further punishment of warring parties in a nation he once helped to its feet...  Read More »

Enough Project’s Akshaya Kumar Testifies on “The Current Human Rights Situation in South Sudan”

On July 10, the Enough Project’s Akshaya Kumar testified on The Current Human Rights Situation in South Sudan before the Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission, stressing that U.S. government must be willing to impose punishing consequences on those most responsible for obstructing the peace, stealing from their own people, and committing atrocity crimes, even if that means targeting those it considered friends in the past.  Read More »

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