Enough Team's blog

U.N. Panel of Experts Reveals Gold Smuggling and Cluster Bombs in Darfur

Last week, the U.N. Security Council’s Panel of Experts on Sudan raised serious concerns over gold smuggling in Darfur. The panel presented its annual report to the Sudan Sanctions Committee in December 2015, but the publication of this report remains blocked due to objections from Russia. Russian Deputy Ambassador Petr Iliichev stated that the panel’s mandate does not include the monitoring of natural resources, noting, “the experts are not behaving like they are required to.” Further, the Russian government declared that it would only allow the publication of the report once the “most controversial paragraphs are edited out,” as it claims that the report is biased and based on speculation.  Read More »

Surprisingly tough UN resolution: Security Council Presses Congo to Hold Timely Elections, Stop Restricting Political Space

Last Wednesday, the United Nations Security Council unanimously passed Resolution 2277 (2016), renewing the mandate until March 31, 2017 to maintain current force levels of 19,815 military personnel in its stabilization mission in the DRC, the UN Organization Stabilization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUSCO).  Read More »

A New Approach to Sudan Sanctions: New Report

The Enough Project released its latest report, “Modernized Sanctions for Sudan: Unfinished Business for the Obama Administration,” outlining a new strategy that the United States must take towards Sudan. The approach recognizes the current unprecedented opportunity to build on emerging leverage with the Sudanese government and deploy new targeted financial pressures to support a peace deal in Sudan.  Read More »

TIME Op-ed: How to Stabilize the Central African Republic

Think the ultimate victor in the U.S. presidential race faces a tough task? The effort to unite a divided America pales in comparison to what lies ahead for Faustin Archange Touadéra, a mathematics professor by tradewho was elected president of the Central African Republic (CAR) last week. Touadéra received a strong mandate from the population, capturing 63% of the votes. The nation’s troubles are, however, far from over, and his immense to-do list might scare many heads of state into early retirement.  Read More »

Amb. Samantha Power: Democratic Journey is Bright Light for CAR

Central African Republic’s President, Faustin-Archange Touadéra, assumed office on March 30, 2016, vowing “to make CAR a united country, a country of peace, a country facing development.” During his inaugural reception in Bangui last week, United States Ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power gave remarks on “Crafting Peace by the Way We Live Our Lives” to honor the newly inaugurated president.   Read More »

European Union Parliament, Student Activists Call for Targeted Sanctions on Kabila's Circle on Elections Issue

A resolution passed on March 10 in the European Union Parliament and a letter addressed to U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry from 25 student leaders in the U.S. have called for increased policy action on President Joseph Kabila of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) to hold national elections freely, fairly, and on time. The two public notices particularly call on the U.S. and E.U. to place targeted sanctions on Kabila’s inner circle. These statements have come at a time when democracy activists are increasingly being jailed in Congo, for example the arrest of 18 LUCHA activists following a peaceful demonstration on March 15.  Read More »

Wildlife Trafficking and Poaching - A Threat to Animals, Atrocity Prevention, and Transparency

Wildlife poaching and trafficking are horrific crimes against animals, and those who work on human rights should also recognize the nexus between those crimes in their own right, corruption, and the human atrocities committed by many of the groups who profit from the illicit trade.  Read More »

Enough Project in NY Times: Root Cause & Solutions to the War in South Sudan

In a riveting dispatch for the New York Times from South Sudan "Where the Soldiers Are Scarier Than the Crocodiles", Nicholas Kristof documents the terror and struggles of people who have sought refuge from war, hiding with their families in swamps and marshy islands to escape attacks by soldiers. Kristof says no solutions are ideal, but calls for "an arms embargo and sanctions aimed at the assets of individuals on each side of the civil war. Make leaders pay a price for intransigence, instead of profiting from it."  Read More »

Nubians Protest Nile River Dams

Activists protest in front of the Embassy of Saudi Arabia in Washington, D.C.

On March 10, 2016, several Sudanese organizations and activists protested in front of the Embassy of Saudi Arabia in Washington, D.C. expressing their concern over the Saudi government’s agreement to finance dam projects in Nubia. With proposals to build three dams along the Nile River, the benefit of enhanced hydroelectric power does not outweigh the destruction of one of the world’s richest archaeological sites and the consequences of large-scale civilian displacement.  Read More »

World Wildlife Day 2016: Blood Ivory - The Elephant in the Room

Thursday, March 3rd 2016 is World Wildlife Day. This year, the theme centers on protection of elephants in particular. Recognizing the links between wildlife trafficking and the perpetration of atrocities in central and eastern Africa, Enough is calling on U.S. Congress to pass critical anti-wildlife trafficking legislation.  Read More »

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