Eastern Congo

Resource Page - Conflict Minerals: A Broader Push for Reform is Essential

Section 1502 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act has been a primary driver of corporate and regional policy change on conflict minerals in the Democratic Republic of Congo (Congo), helping create an economic incentive for ending exploitative mining practices and reforming the region’s minerals sector. However, Dodd-Frank 1502 is only one component in a broad set of peacebuilding tools, and it must be accompanied by other initiatives to advance development of a responsible minerals trade that improves the livelihoods and security of people living in eastern Congo. These changes toward peace must include government and corporate responses, programs directly supporting the livelihoods of community members in eastern Congo, and full implementation of the regional peace agreement known as the Peace, Security and Cooperation (PSC) Framework in a way that is truly inclusive of those most affected by it.

This resource page is designed to provide an update on the efforts to end the conflict minerals trade that finances numerous brutal armed groups in eastern Congo, note remaining challenges, and suggest strategies for encouraging lasting peace.

For more information, please see the additional resources below - and check out the letter published by Congolese civil society members here and joint open letter here.

Background

For nearly two decades, the war and widespread illicit exploitation of natural resources in eastern Congo has subjected Congolese citizens to a humanitarian crisis that desperately needs to be addressed. Broad reform of the minerals sector is part of a comprehensive strategy to end violence in eastern Congo, and Dodd-Frank 1502 is one catalytic component of that effort.

As part of the wider Wall Street reform effort, Dodd-Frank 1502 ordered the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) to develop a rule that requires companies to find out where their minerals come from. The rule, adopted in 2012, aims to interrupt long-standing practices of supply chain opacity, replacing them with mandatory corporate transparency, due diligence, and public awareness about four minerals that are known to fuel unspeakable violence in Congo and the surrounding region. The law has provided an economic incentive for change, which has led to increased security for many mining communities once directly controlled or terrorized by armed groups.

However, governments, donors, and companies have yet to deliver or finalize many of the other critical reforms necessary to end the conflict minerals trade.

Three main areas of reform are needed:

  1. Livelihood programs for mining communities
  2. Increased transparency and due diligence
  3. Governance and mining reforms in Congo and the region
     

Without attention to these three categories, Dodd-Frank 1502 and any other complementary initiatives to end the conflict minerals trade in eastern Congo will be incomplete.

Livelihood Projects for Mining Communities

Dodd-Frank 1502 is making it less profitable for armed groups to illegally trade minerals in Congo and the region, helping begin the shift of the economic environment in eastern Congo and the region away from benefiting armed groups and towards creating incentives for a peaceful trade. Although miners who worked in conflict mines were subject to immense harassment, debt slavery, and attacks by armed groups and military officers, the shifts away from conflict mining also mean that many miners have had to move to other areas to try to earn a livelihood, while the responsible minerals trade slowly develops. From the beginning, human rights and mineral reform advocates have called for livelihood programs for these miners to complement Dodd-Frank 1502, but the programs have been too slow in coming to the ground in Congo. They must be boosted now. This includes:

  • Increasing capacity-building and micro-finance programs for artisanal mining cooperatives in eastern Congo
  • Finalizing reforms to the minerals sector
  • Respecting the rights of artisanal miners and ensuring they are given access to a legal, profitable market for their minerals
  • Significantly enhancing programs to develop alternative sources of income, such as high-value agriculture

Some donors have set up programs, like USAID’s $20 million community recovery project, its $5.8 million Capacity Building for a Responsible Minerals Trade project, and the World Bank’s $79 million “Eastern Recovery Project.” These are helpful starts, but they have yet to be felt by many mining communities that deserve more support. Much more must be done in this area.

Increased Transparency and Due Diligence in Tin, Tantalum, Tungsten, and Gold Supply Chains

The International Conference on the Great Lakes Region (ICGLR) has spearheaded a new regional minerals certification process. Certification is a means to the goals of transparency, compliance, and rule of law. The process has been slow and must advance with more expediency for Congo to see outside investment and experience benefits on the ground.

Retail companies are increasingly engaged in developing positive supply chain management tools, joining multi-stakeholder groups to advance the tools and policies for conflict-free minerals sourcing, and taking an increasing interest in supporting peace in the Great Lakes region. This evolution is largely due to Dodd-Frank 1502’s disclosure requirements and has positive implications for numerous industries and minerals-rich regions around the world.

Governance and Mining Reforms in Congo and the Region

Governance reform in the region’s mining sector must be strengthened, and we must not lose momentum for meaningful, lasting change. Great Lakes governments, particularly Congo, Rwanda and Uganda, must be at the forefront of these efforts, but the U.S. and other governments, international financial institutions, private investors, mining companies, consumers, and other international actors all have roles to play. They should work closely with Congolese mining communities and regional stakeholders to improve mine inspections in Congo and the ICGLR minerals certification process, increase meaningful support to Congolese miners, and invest in conflict-free mines, particularly for gold.

Conclusion

In large part due to Dodd-Frank 1502 and related reform efforts, there is progress toward the development of a conflict-free minerals sector in Congo. There are laws in place to prevent multinational companies from having opaque supply chains, and an increasing number of mines are being validated as conflict-free. Dodd-Frank 1502 is only one part of the solution, but if it is undermined or dispensed with, companies will return to a climate of impunity for profiting from violent conflict and lucrative minerals will continue to enrich warlords in Congo.

Additional Resources

- Six Facts from the North Kivu Civil Society Organizations Specialized in the Sector of Natural Resources     

- Open Letter - Conflict Minerals: A Broader Push for Reform is Essential

- Expectations for Companies’ Conflict Minerals Reporting

- Understanding Conflict Minerals Provisions

- The Impact of Dodd-Frank and Conflict Minerals Reforms on Eastern Congo's War

- Conflict Minerals 101 and Conflict Gold 101 Videos

- Activist Brief - Striking Gold: Why the Illicit Gold Trade in Eastern Congo Matters

 

Eastern Congo

Over 5.4 million dead. Over 2 million displaced. Congo is home to the deadliest conflict since World War II.

The war in eastern Congo began in the early 1990s and continues to this day. It has encompassed two international wars—from 1996 to 1997 and 1998 to 2003—and multiple invasions from neighboring countries, with combatants from many armed groups, both foreign and domestic. While Congo has abundant natural resources, it is also the world’s poorest country per capita, according to the United Nations. Congo is also home to the largest and most expensive U.N. peacekeeping mission in the world, MONUSCO, which has more than 20,000 personnel and an annual budget of $1.4 billion. The eastern part of the country is plagued by instability, as militias continue to wreak havoc on the population. Meanwhile, the conflict gets very little coverage by the international media.

The conflict in Congo is notorious for serious violations of human rights, including violence against women and the use of child soldiers. Since 1996 the International Rescue Committee has calculated that approximately 5.4 million people have died from war-related causes. In 2012 Congo ranked lowest on the United Nations Human Development Index.

Armed GroupsArmed Groups

Armed groups wreak havoc in eastern Congo by terrorizing communities and fighting for power and access to mineral resources. Read More

Conflict MineralsConflict Minerals

Armed groups and Congolese military use profits from trading in conflict minerals to self-finance campaigns of brutal violence against civilians. Read More

Justice and AccountabilityJustice and Accountability

Congo needs a system of justice and accountability by which perpetrators of atrocity crimes are caught, tried, and punished for their crimes. Read More

Security Sector ReformSecurity Sector Reform

Congolese security forces pose a significant threat to civilians. In eastern Congo, they commit murder and rape, and carry out torture and extortion. Read More

Congolese WomanSexual Violence

Every day, women and girls face threats from armed militias, the military, and even the police who are responsible for protecting them. Read More

Sustaining LivelihoodsSustaining Livelihoods

As Congo's mining industry transitions from conflict minerals trade to legitimate business, miners need help transitioning to other sustainable sources of livelihood. Read More

 

Help end the crisis in eastern Congo: Take action now. 

Stay updated on Eastern Congo: Read the latest reports.

Brandeis University Goes Conflict-Free

Date: 
May 21, 2015

 

$4 Million Annual Electronics Purchase Policy to Support Peace in Congo

May 21, 2015 - Student activists are celebrating the announcement from Brandeis University of a new policy to ensure computers and other electronic equipment they purchase are not connected to killing, child abductions, and sexual violence in the mining sector of the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Spurred by an international student movement called the Conflict-Free Campus Initiative, the procurement policy requires that the makers of all of the university's most commonly purchased electronic equipment be surveyed to determine possible connections to illegal mining and smuggling in eastern Congo by violent armed groups.

Annie CallawaySenior Advocacy Associate at the Enough Project, said: "The Brandeis resolution shows how far the conflict-free movement has come. Brandeis is the 19th school worldwide to change its procurement policy to favor companies working to make their products conflict-free and support the livelihoods of Congolese miners and their communities. Thanks to the hard work of students leading the Conflict-Free Campus Initiative at Brandeis, the university has taken an important extra step by committing to survey companies on their conflict mineral policies. This proactive industry engagement by Brandeis will further amplify the call for products made with conflict-free minerals sourced from eastern Congo.”

Gina GkoulgkountinaConflict-Free Campus Initiative (CFCI) student leader at Brandeis, said: "After 3 years working to pass a conflict-free procurement resolution, I am proud to see Brandeis joining the growing community of schools actively supporting peace in Congo. Working with the Library and Technology Services, procurement and administration staff to achieve this has been an incredibly rewarding experience. I am confident Brandeis will implement this critical policy in a thorough, responsible manner."

Lisa M. Lynch, Ph.D., Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Hexter Professor of Social and Economic Policy at Brandeis University, said: "From the founding of the university, a special characteristic of Brandeis students has been how profoundly they care about people around the world and take action to address problems faced by the most vulnerable. Today, I am extremely proud of our students and their initiative to address the human tragedies caused by conflict minerals. After advocacy by our students who are involved with the Enough Project, our policy committee voted unanimously to ask the suppliers of our most commonly purchased and leased electronic items (desktop and laptop computers, printers, scanners, and copiers) to show due diligence in auditing the sources and provenance of potential conflict minerals in their supply chain."

Brandeis spends an estimated $4 million annually on computers and other products that are potentially affected by the new “conflict-free” policy. The resolution builds momentum for statewide conflict minerals legislation in Massachusetts.

For media inquiries or interview requests, please contact: Greg Hittelman, +1 310-717-0606gh@enoughproject.org 

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ABOUT THE ENOUGH PROJECT

For media use, short version: "The Enough Project, an atrocity prevention research and policy group."

The Enough Project is a project of the Center for American Progress aiming to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on the crises in Sudan, South Sudan, eastern Congo, Central African Republic, Somalia, and areas affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough conducts intensive field research in conflict zones, develops practical policies to address these crises, and shares sensible tools to empower citizens and groups working for change. For more information, visit www.EnoughProject.org

ABOUT THE CONFLICT-FREE CAMPUS INITIATIVE

An initiative of the Enough Project’s “Raise Hope for Congo” campaign, the Conflict-Free Campus Initiative (CFCI) draws on the power of student leadership and activism to help support peace in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. By encouraging university officials and stakeholders - both of whom are large purchasers of electronics and powerful spokespersons - to commit to measures that pressure electronics companies to responsibly invest in the minerals sector, students are voicing the demand for conflict-free products from Congo. Comprehensive reform is needed in Congo to bring about sustainable peace - now is the time is for students to lead the conflict-free movement. Join us: www.raisehopeforcongo.org/campus

NGOs, Congo Experts Identify Tom Perriello as Top-Choice Candidate for U.S. Congo Envoy Position

Secretary Kerry, Special Envoy Feingold Meet With President Kabila in DRC

Russ Feingold was the highest-level U.S. envoy ever deployed to the Democratic Republic of Congo and the Great Lakes Region of Africa. Today, two months after Feingold’s resignation to run for Senate, the pressure is mounting on Secretary of State John Kerry to appoint a new, high-level Special Envoy.NGOs, Members of Congress, and Congo experts are all weighing in on the conversation. The United States must swiftly appoint a new envoy whose credentials and position within the State Department’s hierarchy mirror those of Feingold. A name has emerged as a frontrunner in the Congo coalition community: former Congressman Tom Perriello.   Read More »

The Resolve and Invisible Children Release New LRA Crisis Tracker Report

LRA Crisis Tracker

The recently released report indicates that the LRA’s fighting capacity is dropping, and while killings are fewer, attacks and abductions have increased - in 2014, total LRA attacks rose 10% and abductions 32% compared to 2013.  Read More »

My Story: From Congo to the NFL

Andy Mulumba speaks at the Rally for Congo in Madison, WI

Green Bay Packers linebacker and Enough Project upstander Andy Mulumba writes about why he supports the Raise Hope for Congo campaign.  Read More »

Members of Congress Urge President Obama to Appoint New High-Level Special Envoy for Great Lakes Region and DRC

On May 5th, 22 Members of Congress sent a letter to President Obama, urging him to quickly appoint a new high-level U.S. Special Envoy for the Great Lakes Region and the Democratic Republic of Congo to replace Russ Feingold, who stepped down from the position earlier this year.   Read More »

6th Annual Women in the World Summit: A Conversation with Samantha Power and Robin Wright

Samantha Power, the United States Ambassador to the UN, in conversation with actor and Enough Project upstander Robin Wright, on endemic violence and corruption in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Samantha Power, the United States Ambassador to the UN, in conversation with actor and Enough Project upstander Robin Wright, on endemic violence and corruption in the Democratic Republic of Congo, where rape as a weapon of war is commonplace, and where the land's abundant minerals perpetuate instability and conflict.

Robin Wright, Award-Winning Actress, Director, Philanthropist, Co-Founder Pour Les Femmes Sleepwear 

Samantha Power, U.S. Ambassador to the U.N.

Moderated by Darren Walker, President, Ford Foundation

The Sixth Annual Women In The World Summit was hosted from April 22-24, 2015. The struggles and triumphs of women and girls around the globe came to life in this dynamic three-day summit. World leaders, industry icons, movie stars, and CEOs convened with artists, rebels, peacemakers, and activists to tell their stories and share their plans of action.

For more information, please visit: nytlive.nytimes.com/womenintheworld.

My Night with Robin Wright

Robin Wright and student activists

In April 2015, CFCI Campus Organizer Corey Jones had the opportunity to attend an event at the University of Florida with actor and activist Robin Wright. In this post Corey reflects on the evening, the power of influence, and his work advocating for peace in Congo.  Read More »

Congo’s Conflict Gold Rush and What to Do about It

While significant progress has been made towards creating a conflict-free minerals trade in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, gold continues to fund armed commanders. Thanks to on the ground initiatives in Congo, international activist and industry pressure, and federal legislation in the United States, 70 percent of the 3T mines (tin, tantalum, and tungsten) are now free of armed groups and Congo’s army, according to the International Peace Information Service. However, only 35 percent of gold mines in eastern Congo are conflict-free, with abusive Congolese army commanders and armed groups still profiting from the trade.

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