Eastern Congo

Going for Gold: Engaging the Jewelry Industry in Responsible Gold Sourcing in Africa’s Great Lakes Region

In the Democratic Republic of the Congo (“Congo”), gold is a major financial lifeline for armed actors. Fortunately, jewelry retailers and consumers can play important roles to help end the conflict gold trade and the suffering it causes, together with the actions of governments. The Enough Project has engaged with the largest jewelry retailers in an effort to encourage companies to use their power and resources in more robust, effective ways to support responsible sourcing in Congo and the Great Lakes Region. Two companies in particular—Tiffany & Co. and Signet Jewelers—have demonstrated clear leadership in beginning to address the conflict gold issue by taking proactive steps to set up supply chain controls, contribute to solutions on the ground in Congo, and support the communities affected by mining and violence in Congo.

Learn More About the #CongoGold Jewelry Leader Review and Campaign here.


Seven ideas to help end the FDLR rebel group in Congo

In a new report, “How to Dismantle a Deadly Militia” the Enough Project sets out seven key non-military approaches to help ending the FDLR’s ability to continue to threaten peace and security in eastern Congo and the region.  Read More »

Cal Poly Passes Conflict Minerals Resolution

On May 20th, 2014, the California Polytechnic State University (Cal Poly) Academic Senate passed a conflict minerals resolution, making Cal Poly the 17th school to go conflict-free. The official statement, recently published on the University's Office of Contracts, Procurement, and Risk Management website, acknowledges the problem of conflict minerals, resolves to take into account whether companies are working to address the problem when making purchasing decisions for the University, calls upon the entire California State University system to adopt similar practices.  Read More »

Fighting Impunity: The Role of Sanctions in Ending Conflict in Congo

The plight of women and children in eastern Congo has not received the urgent response it needs, which has facilitated widespread impunity. This culture of impunity allows perpetrators to continue their violations against vulnerable civilians. Sanctions on such perpetrators help combat the culture of impunity by holding the guilty accountable, allowing the survivors and their communities the opportunity to move forward and sending a clear message that violence against women and children will not be tolerated.  Read More »

Resource Page - Conflict Minerals: A Broader Push for Reform is Essential

This resource page is designed to provide an update on the efforts to end the conflict minerals trade that finances numerous brutal armed groups in eastern Congo, note remaining challenges, and suggest strategies for encouraging lasting peace.  Read More »

Building a Movement: Students & Business Leaders Call for Greater Action on Conflict Minerals, Especially Gold

Cooperative efforts by student activists like Roxanne Rahnama and socially-conscious companies like Intel indicate a sustained and growing interest in the conflict-free movement and exemplify its cross-cutting nature.  Read More »

Does Your Technology Have a Conscience? Student Activism and the Conflict-Free Movement

Roxanne Rahnama is the Strategic Oversight and Resolutions Coordinator for the Conflict-Free Campus Initiative. This video shares her story about joining the conflict-free movement and highlights the importance of collaboration between activists and companies like Intel who are working to source clean minerals from Congo.

Pressure from consumers, students, and activists has spurred action within the electronics industry to clean up their supply chains. Companies like Intel are leading the way to ensure that their products do not contain minerals that originated in conflict areas in Congo. While much progress has been made in recent years, further action is needed in order for a truly conflict-free minerals trade to take root.

Roxanne Rahnama is the Strategic Oversight and Resolutions Coordinator for the Enough Project's Conflict-Free Campus Initiative. Roxanne is a senior at UC Berkeley, where she is pursuing a B.A. in Economics, a B.S. in Environmental Economics and Policy, and minoring in Global Poverty and Practice. At Berkeley, she founded and facilitates an undergraduate-run course on Natural Resource Conflicts and Corporate Social Responsibility. She first became involved in the Conflict-Free Campus Initiative after serving as a Raise Hope for Congo intern at the Enough Project in the summer of 2012.

Canada to Vote on Conflict Minerals Legislation, Should Join Support for Mining Reforms and Livelihood Projects in Congo

On September 24th, the Canadian House of Commons will hold a Second Reading vote on Bill C-486: The Conflict Minerals Act. Bills like C-486, Provision 1502 of the Dodd-Frank Act in the U.S., and legislation proposed by the Eurpoean Union indicate the growing global movement dedicated to eliminating the flow of conflict minerals. In addition to these positive steps, Canada, along with other important donor governments, must also step up their support for mining reform efforts and livelihood projects in Congo.  Read More »

Jewelry Leaders and CEOs Join Enough Project in Conflict Gold Solutions Forum

On July 27, 2014, The Enough Project participated in roundtable discussion at the Jewelers of America (JA) New York Show, co-hosted by JA and the National Retail Federation (NRF), to discuss the need for responsible gold sourcing from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Currently, the illegal mining and trade of minerals, particularly gold, fuel terrible violence and suffering for the Congolese people. The discussion centered on industry experiences and practical tools to build on current corporate initiatives for responsible sourcing and development in Congo and the Great Lakes Region.  Read More »

Brutal, Conflict Minerals Smuggling General Escapes Justice

In important developments last Thursday, on 31 July, Congolese authorities cleared all charges leveled against General Amisi Kumba, former commander of the Congolese land forces. Amisi was suspended on 22 November 2012 following accusations made by the United Nations Group of Experts that he “oversees a network distributing hunting ammunition for poachers and armed groups, including Raïa Mutomboki” and Nyatura. The Rwandan government further asserted that Amisi contributes weapons to the FDLR rebel group. Amisi is also accused of a number of war crimes including widespread killings, summary executions, rapes, and pillage.  Read More »

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