Sudan and South Sudan

George Clooney Announces Expansion of Satellite Sentinel Project

During the May 20 Elie Wiesel Foundation dinner, George Clooney announced an expansion to the Satellite Sentinel Project (SSP), an initiative he co-founded three years ago with the Enough Project’s John Prendergast. While it will continue to use satellite imagery to monitor and warn against human rights abuses in war-torn Sudan and South Sudan, SSP will expand its work in reaction to the changes in modern conflicts.   Read More »

George Clooney Announces Expansion of Satellite Sentinel Project

Date: 
May 21, 2014

For Immediate Release

Contact: Christina DiPasquale, 202.716.1953, christina@fitzgibbonmedia.com

George Clooney Announces Expansion of Satellite Sentinel Project

During a speech yesterday, May 20, at the Elie Wiesel Foundation for Humanity dinner, George Clooney announced a significant expansion of the Satellite Sentinel Project, an initiative he co-founded three years ago. While it will continue to use satellite imagery to monitor and warn against human rights abuses in war-torn Sudan and South Sudan, the Satellite Sentinel Project will expand its focus to undertake forensic investigations to reveal how those committing mass atrocities are funding their activities and where they are hiding their stolen assets.

Satellite Sentinel Project Co-Founder George Clooney said, “We want to follow the money and find out how these atrocities are funded, who enables them, and what the smart tools are to counter these activities more effectively. Genocide and other human rights crimes are never just spontaneous events. They require planning, they require financing, and they require international indifference to succeed.  Where is the money coming from and where is it being hidden? To the extent we can, we want to make it more difficult for those willing to kill en masse to secure their political and economic objectives, and we want to move the needle away from indifference and inaction.”

Satellite Sentinel Project Co-Founder John Prendergast said, “We’ll investigate exactly how the illegal exploitation of resources like diamonds, gold and ivory help finance the activities of some of the world’s worst abusers of human rights. And we’ll focus on imposing a cost on those that contribute to or facilitate the perpetration of these human rights crimes. The objective is a comprehensive approach to countering atrocities that involves satellite imagery, forensic investigations, on-the-ground research, and deeper investment in impacting the calculations of policy makers and commercial actors who might possess the leverage to help stop these human rights crimes.”

The Satellite Sentinel Project is a partnership between the Enough Project and Not On Our Watch. Satellite imagery and analysis is provided by DigitalGlobe. The geographic area of focus will encompass Sudan, South Sudan, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the Central African Republic, and the surrounding region. 

For more information on the Satellite Sentinel Project, please visit http://www.satsentinel.org/. For interviews with John Prendergast, Satellite Sentinel Project Co-Founder, please contact Christina DiPasquale at 202.716.1953 or christina@fitzgibbonmedia.com.

STATEMENT: U.S. Needs to Build on Secretary Kerry's Initiatives in South Sudan to Prevent Genocide and Famine

Date: 
May 2, 2014

For Immediate Release: 2 May 2014
Contact: Christina DiPasquale, 202.716.1953Christina@fitzgibbonmedia.com

STATEMENT: U.S. Needs to Build on Secretary Kerry's Initiatives in South Sudan to Prevent Genocide and Famine

Today, as Secretary Kerry visits Juba in his effort to prioritize civilian protection throughout South Sudan, The Enough Project released the following statement from Co-Founder John Prendergast, former Director for African Affairs at the National Security Council:

“Two words that never should be used lightly are beginning to be heard with alarming frequency in South Sudan today: genocide and famine.  The danger of both is clear and present, and state collapse threatens.  Targeting people on the basis of their identity and obstructing humanitarian access puts hundreds of thousands of lives at immediate risk.

"Full support should be given to deploying troops from neighboring states to protect civilians who are most vulnerable to being attacked, raped or killed on the basis of their ethnicity.   

"At the same time, meaningful consequences must be deployed for the commission of war crimes.  The U.S. should work closely with neighboring states and the African Union to freeze the assets of those South Sudanese rebel or government officials found to be orchestrating human rights crimes.  These officials own fixed assets and have accounts in Kenya, Uganda, Ethiopia, South Africa and Dubai, but a great deal of diplomatic effort will need to convince those governments to act. 

"Furthermore, the creation of a mixed special court -- partly international, partly South Sudanese -- would enhance the potential for justice and accountability for those that have orchestrated some of the worst crimes.  If the idea emerges, it should be fully supported by Secretary Kerry."

See also:

To speak to an Enough Project spokesperson, please contact Christina DiPasquale at 202.716.1953 or Christina@fitzgibbonmedia.com.

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The Enough Project is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on the crises in Sudan, South Sudan, eastern Congo, and areas affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough conducts intensive field research, develops practical policies to address these crises, and shares sensible tools to empower citizens and groups working for change. To learn more about Enough, go to www.enoughproject.org.

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Op-ed: Darfur, The Genocide America Forgot

Earlier this month, Sudan’s paramilitary Janjaweed forces razed 127 empty villages in Darfur to the ground. According to reports in local media, this was their second rampage over the same territory in as many months.   Read More »

Human Security Alert: Massive Mobilization of Sudan Armed Forces (SAF) in the Nuba Mountains

The Satellite Sentinel Project (SSP) is issuing a human security alert for the civilian population of the Kauda Valley in the war-torn Nuba Mountains region of Sudan. Digital Globe Intelligence Solutions (DGIS) imagery has captured a significant mobilization of Sudan Armed Forces (SAF) around Rashad, Delaba, and Umm Abdallah in the Nuba Mountains, South Kordofan, Sudan.  Read More »

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