Sudan and South Sudan

African Union Commission of Inquiry on South Sudan Report

The African Union’s long-awaited report on the crisis in South Sudan strongly makes the case that sustainable peace must not only address justice for victims of atrocities but also tackle the underlying economic sources of the conflict, which Enough argues include the pursuit by individuals of their own economic interests at the expense of the South Sudanese people.  Read More »

AU Report Documents Rebel Atrocities in South Sudan

An African Union report on the crisis in South Sudan says rebel soldiers committed gross human rights abuses that include rape and ethnically targeted killings of civilians. The report released by a Commission of Inquiry this week, interviewed witnesses in the towns of Bor, Malakal and Bentiu, who all testified about the abuse they endured in rebel hands after the capture of these locations at the onset of the war.  Read More »

Human Rights Watch on UN’s Responsibility to Rape Victims in Darfur

Approaching the one-year mark of a mass rape in Tabit, North Darfur, Human Rights Watch (HRW) has released a dispatch calling on the United Nations to do more to protect the survivors and those still at risk. This publication follows HRW’s October 12 dispatch detailing ongoing violations of women’s rights in Sudan’s conflict zones as well as the regime’s application of repressive and discriminatory laws to diminish the ability of women to participate in public life.  Read More »

AU Unveils Long-awaited Report on Crisis in South Sudan

Displaced civilians seek refuge at an UNMISS facility in Juba on Dec 16, 2013

A long-delayed African Union report on the crisis in South Sudan says that the targeted killings of hundreds of Nuer tribesmen in Juba in December 2013, was a deliberate action sponsored by the state. According to the report, the method by which the killings were committed prove their “widespread or systematic nature.” Roadblocks were established around Juba and security forces undertook house-to-house searches. Male Nuers were “targeted, identified, killed on the spot or gathered in one place and killed.”  Read More »

South Sudan Church Leaders Remind Government and Rebels to Respect Peace Deal

Amidst numerous violations of the ceasefire in South Sudan, including politicians’ actions that pose a threat to the recently signed peace agreement, church leaders in Juba reminded the government and rebels to respect the pact.  Read More »

Professor’s Departure Raises Questions on Freedom of Expression in South Sudan

The abrupt departure of an academic from South Sudan’s largest university has raised new concerns about the state of free expression in Africa’s newest country.  Read More »

Life as a Surgeon in Sudan’s Nuba Mountains: Atavist Feature

A recent Atavist Magazine feature highlighted the work of Dr. Tom Catena, the only surgeon working in the Nuba Mountains, in southern Sudan.  Read More »

Sudan Tribune Op-ed: Sudan’s National “Monologue”

On October 10, Sudan President Omar al-Bashir launched a purported National Dialogue in Khartoum, nearly two years after he had first announced his intention to hold a forum to resolve the country’s numerous social, economic, and political issues. In the intervening period, Bashir and the ruling National Congress Party (NCP) handpicked participants, naming a congregation of mostly minor splinter parties, perhaps upward of 100 parties in all. Bashir and his ruling party determined the National Dialogue agenda unilaterally, setting up a 7+7 steering committee of seven parties allied with the government and seven opposition parties. Bashir also gave himself the authority to oversee this exercise.  Read More »

Hard Currency Scarcity and the South Sudan Economy

South Sudan’s ministry of finance has stopped selling hard currency to the country’s central bank. The advent of armed conflict, which broke out in December 2013, has reduced the production of oil, the country’s main revenue earner by 32 percent, affecting the overall performance of the economy.  Read More »

Sudan to Chair UN Food Agency Despite Blocking Rations to Peacekeepers

On Wednesday, U.N. spokesperson Stéphane Dujarric announced that the Sudanese government had seized 190 cargo containers containing food rations and operational supplies for peacekeepers in Darfur. Despite this announcement, on Thursday, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) announced that Amira Gornass, Sudan’s Ambassador to U.N.-based agencies in Rome, will serve as the next Chairperson to the FAO’s influential Committee on Food Security.   Read More »

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