Sudan and South Sudan

Senate Human Rights Caucus briefing: “The Crisis in Sudan: Prospects for Justice and Peace.”

On June 23, Enough Project Senior Advisor Omer Ismail spoke at the Senate Human Rights Caucus special congressional briefing on Sudan, hosted by co-chairs Senator Mark Kirk and Senator Chris Coons and the Washington Working Group on the International Criminal Court (WICC).  Read More »

Akshaya Kumar on BBC Newsday: Six Generals Face Sanctions

Akshaya Kumar speaks to BBC Newsday on the United Nations Security Council imposing sanctions on six generals accused of fueling ongoing fighting in South Sudan.

The United Nations Security Council has imposed sanctions on six generals accused of fueling ongoing fighting in South Sudan. The generals, three each from each side of the conflict, will face global travel bans and asset freezes. The sanctions comes just days after a UN report alleged that government troops had gang raped and burned alive women and girls in the oil rich Unity State, during an offensive against rebel troops. Akshaya Kumar is Sudan and South Sudan Policy Analyst at the Enough Project. 

Enough Project’s Kumar Testifies to Congress on South Sudan War

Date: 
Jul 10, 2015

 

In morning hearing, expert describes “scorched earth campaigns,” “war economy”

July 10, 2015 (Washington DC) – Making a case for targeted sanctions enforcement, stolen asset recovery efforts, and accountability for economic crimes, the Enough Project’s Akshaya Kumar testified this morning at the U.S. House of Representatives Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission's hearing on “The Current Human Rights Situation in South Sudan.”

The open hearing, at which Kumar joined former Ambassador to South Sudan Susan Page, representatives from Amnesty International and other experts, was called to examine the escalating violence and humanitarian crisis in the world’s newest nation. South Sudan, which had its fourth anniversary of independence yesterday, is caught in a civil war that has seen widespread human rights violations and atrocities, including rape, child soldiers, abductions, the targeting of civilians, and the burning of villages.

Excerpts from Lantos Commission testimony by Akshaya Kumar, Sudan and South Sudan Analyst at the Enough Project:

  • "A generation is being lost once more. This is a great tragedy, but the greater tragedy is that all of this is happening in a climate of incredible impunity. With biting sanctions enforcement, asset recovery efforts and a push for a hybrid court, together, we can change that."
  • "The American people have long stood in solidarity with the people of South Sudan. For decades, that meant supporting their leaders in an international campaign to secure their freedom. Now, that dynamic must change."
  • "It’s hard to imagine that anyone could possibly benefit from tit-for-tat scorched earth campaigns that have driven over two million people from their homes and left one in ten South Sudanese households in Upper Nile facing catastrophic famine conditions. And it’s even harder to conceive how advantage could be gained from fighting that UNICEF confirms has often involved castrating young boys and raping young girls. But the cold hard truth is that there are people who profit from the war economy in South Sudan and the grand corruption that enables it."

In her testimony, Kumar urged the US government to impose punishing consequences on those most responsible for obstructing the peace, grand corruption, and atrocity crimes, and proposed a three-pronged approach:

  1. measured escalation of existing individual targeted sanctions to ban the travel and freeze the assets of the country’s political elite and their enablers,
  2. legal action to confiscate ill-gotten gains and jumpstart efforts to recover and return the billions in stolen assets taken from South Sudan,
  3. a hybrid court with jurisdiction over atrocity crimes, including economic crimes like pillage and grand corruption.

Link to complete testimony by Akshaya Kumar: http://eno.ug/1fsak0d

Recent op-ed by George Clooney, John Prendergast, and Akshaya Kumar, “Sanctions Threats Are Not Enough in South Sudan”: http://eno.ug/1FCYBAD

For media inquiries or interview requests, please contact: Greg Hittelman,  +1 310-717-0606gh@enoughproject.org 

###

ABOUT THE ENOUGH PROJECT

For media use, short version: "The Enough Project, an atrocity prevention research and policy group."

The Enough Project is a project of the Center for American Progress aiming to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on the crises in Sudan, South Sudan, eastern Congo, Central African Republic, Somalia, and areas affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough conducts intensive field research in conflict zones, develops practical policies to address these crises, and shares sensible tools to empower citizens and groups working for change. For more information, visit www.EnoughProject.org

Testimony of Akshaya Kumar- The Current Human Rights Situation in South Sudan

Testimony of Akshaya Kumar, Enough Project Sudan and South Sudan Policy Analyst, before the United States Congress Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission hearing on “The Current Human Rights Situation in South Sudan,” given on July 10, 2015.

South Sudan Marks Independence amid Civil War, Escalating Crisis

Date: 
Jul 8, 2015

 

Enough Project to Testify on Crisis before Congress this Friday

July 8, 2015 – South Sudan marks the fourth anniversary of its independence this Thursday, July 9th. The world’s newest nation is locked in a devastating civil war that has displaced 2 million people and left almost half the population without enough food to eat. In conflict-affected areas, UN and relief agencies report burned villages, killings, rape, abductions, and targeted attacks on civilians, including on women and children.

John Prendergast, Founding Director of the Enough Project said: "Even as the people of South Sudan celebrate their country's independence today, it is clear that their leaders have squandered the opportunity independence presented them with just 4 years ago.  South Sudan has now spent 40% of the time it has been independent mired in a brutal internecine war triggered by a power struggle among a handful of elites, and now 40% of the country needs emergency food aid to survive. This is not the future that South Sudan's people aspired towards during their decades’ long civil war, and this is not the future they deserve."

Link to recent op-ed by George Clooney, John Prendergast, and Akshaya Kumar, “Sanctions Threats Are Not Enough in South Sudan”: http://eno.ug/1FCYBAD

US Congress to Hear Enough Project Testimony

This Friday, Akshaya Kumar, Enough Project Sudan and South Sudan Analyst, will testify to the US Congress on “The Current Human Rights Situation in South Sudan.” At the hearing before the Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission, Kumar will join Ambassador Susan Page, Special Advisor to the U.S. Special Envoy to Sudan and South Sudan, Department of State; Linda Etim, Deputy Assistant Administrator, Africa Bureau, USAID; and representatives from Amnesty International and Catholic Relief Services. 

For details on the Lantos Commission hearing, visit: http://eno.ug/1S9ey8B

For media inquiries or interview requests, please contact: Greg Hittelman,  +1 310-717-0606gh@enoughproject.org 

###

ABOUT THE ENOUGH PROJECT

For media use, short version: "The Enough Project, an atrocity prevention research and policy group."

The Enough Project is a project of the Center for American Progress aiming to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on the crises in Sudan, South Sudan, eastern Congo, Central African Republic, Somalia, and areas affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough conducts intensive field research in conflict zones, develops practical policies to address these crises, and shares sensible tools to empower citizens and groups working for change. For more information, visit www.EnoughProject.org

Enough Project Statement: UN Security Council Must Act Now to Check Impunity in South Sudan

Today, the Enough Project released a statement calling on the UN Security Council to issue sanctions against human rights abusers in South Sudan as an essential step in combatting the unchecked impunity that has come to define the country's political environment. In addition to demonstrating the international community's united resolve to combat impunity, these sanctions can also help forge an enabling environment for peace negotiations.  Read More »

CNN Op-ed: Sanctions Threats Are Not Enough

George Clooney joins Enough's John Prendergast and Akshaya Kumar on CNN.com arguing that since greed is driving the calculations of South Sudan’s government and rebel leaders, the surest route to peace is by hitting them in their wallets with biting sanctions. Their piece offers a peek at our newest initiative to dismantle the financial networks fueling and profiting from Africa’s deadliest wars, launching in July.  Read More »

TIME Op-ed on Omar al-Bashir's Escape

This op-ed was written by the Enough Project's Founding Director John Prendergast and Sudan and South Sudan Policy Analyst Akshaya Kumar and originally appeared in TIME as "The Sudanese President’s Escape Highlights the Determination of African Lawyers" on June 15, 2015.  Read More »

Hill Briefing: The Ongoing Crisis in South Sudan

Enough Project Sudan and South Sudan Policy Analyst Justine Fleischner spoke at a June 10 briefing on Capitol Hill titled “The Ongoing Crisis in South Sudan: A Detailed Outlook on the Situation”. The briefing was hosted by Representative Charles Rangel (D-NY13).  Read More »

Regional Power, Profit Obstruct Peace in South Sudan

Date: 
Jun 10, 2015

June 10, 2015 --- Entangled and competing regional interests are undermining efforts to end the civil war in South Sudan, according to a report published today by the Enough Project. “Neighborhood Watch: Mobilizing Regional Action for Peace in South Sudan” is the first in a new “Political Economy of African Wars” series, launched by Enough’s founding director John Prendergast. The series will feature in-depth, field research-driven reports on dynamics of power and profit fueling armed conflicts in the Horn, East and Central Africa.

Justine Fleischner, Sudan and South Sudan Policy Analyst at the Enough Project, said: “South Sudan's peace process is playing out like a deadly poker game among regional elites where the stakes keep getting raised, but nobody has a particularly good hand. Regional players like Uganda and Sudan have placed bets on the conflict, providing support for either the government or opposition forces, in order to maintain their access to South Sudan's natural resource wealth. Unless the U.S. and other key international partners step up both diplomatic efforts and economic pressure, neither of the warring sides are likely to fold anytime soon.”

Akshaya Kumar, Sudan and South Sudan Policy Analyst at the Enough Project, said:  “In South Sudan, entangled interests have obstructed forward momentum on peace. Presidents Kenyatta and Museveni serve as mediators of the conflict on one day, and then meet with President Kiir the next day to discuss joint regional infrastructure projects. But, if external donors make it clear that peace is a prerequisite for development, those same dynamics can be leveraged to end the war.”

John Prendergast, Founding Director of the Enough Project, said: "President Obama will travel to Africa next month and South Sudan will be front and center on the agenda of his meetings with regional leaders.  The huge U.S. investment in the world's newest country is disintegrating as South Sudan spirals more deeply into civil war.  President Obama should use his interactions with regional leaders to build support for much greater regional pressure on the warring parties in South Sudan.  The clearest way to building that leverage is for the region to impose and enforce biting targeted sanctions on those in South Sudan obstructing peace, especially given that so many of their ill-gotten assets are concentrated in neighboring states."

To build regional support for targeted sanctions enforcement, the Enough report recommends that the U.S. and other international partners focus on cutting off money flows fueling  the conflict, building political will and technical capacity for regional sanctions enforcement, and working with regional players to build economic and political incentives for peace.

Fleischner added: “At the end of the day, the war has been devastating for the regional economy, not just South Sudan. The U.S., China, and other international partners that are invested in the region have an obligation to address these competing interests and ensure the people of South Sudan are not the only ones to bear the cost of this conflict.”

Kumar added:  “South Sudan's war is costing its neighbors billions. We expect the powerful businessmen profiting from South Sudan's war economy will try to prevent regional enforcement of biting asset freezes. But the greed-driven lobbying of elites should not stop the region from acting in its collective best interest. The African Union announced support for asset freezes and travel bans on South Sudan's warring parties weeks ago, and South Sudan's neighbors now need to the do the same.”

About Enough’s “Political Economy of African Wars” series:

“The Enough Project is launching a new series of in-depth, field research-driven reports on the dynamics of profit and power fueling war in the Horn, East and Central Africa. Violent kleptocracies dominate the political landscape of this region, leading to protracted conflicts marked by the commission of mass atrocities by state and non-state actors. Enough's Political Economy of African Wars series will focus on the key players in these conflicts, their motivations, how they benefit from the evolving war economies, and what policies might be most effective in changing the calculations of those orchestrating the violence–including both incentives and pressures for peace.” - Introduction to the series by founding director John Prendergast

Link to the full report “Neighborhood Watch”: http://eno.ug/1JHn9hZ 

For media inquiries or to arrange an interview with an Enough Project spokesperson, please contact: Greg Hittelman, Director of Communications, +1 310 717-0606, gh@enoughproject.org

ABOUT THE ENOUGH PROJECT

For media use, short version: "The Enough Project, an atrocity prevention research and policy group."

The Enough Project is a project of the Center for American Progress aiming to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on the crises in Sudan, South Sudan, eastern Congo, Central African Republic, Somalia, and areas affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough conducts intensive field research in conflict zones, develops practical policies to address these crises, and shares sensible tools to empower citizens and groups working for change. For more information, visit www.EnoughProject.org

Syndicate content