Sudan and South Sudan

Will Bashir's Visit Hamper Zimbabwe's Pleas for Aid? - The Christian Science Monitor

Date: 
Jun 8, 2009
Author: 
Scott Baldauf

 Johannesburg, South Africa - Zimbabwean Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai's job has just gotten harder. Just as he hits the road on a three-week tour to convince rich Western nations to end their sanctions against Zimbabwe and to send more aid money, Zimbabwe's president, Robert Mugabe, is back home in Harare, reminding the world that he doesn't pay attention to their rules.

At a regional summit of the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA) held this week in Zimbabwe's capital, Harare, Mr. Mugabe has held meetings with, among others, Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir, the first sitting president to ever face an arrest warrant for war crimes and crimes against humanity. 

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Walk for Darfur

Darfuri women return from the countryside

Rights Groups Regret Obama's Speech in Cairo - The Sudan Tribune

Date: 
Jun 5, 2009

 June 4, 2009 (WASHINGTON) – Several rights groups and activists regretted that US President Barack Obama did not tackle questions of human rights, freedom of the press or the situation for millions of displaced people from Darfur in his speech before an audience at Cairo University.

In his 55 minute speech in the capital of Egypt, Obama mentioned something about Darfur, but did not address the ongoing bilateral dialogue between the US and the Government of Sudan.

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Falling Short On Sudan

President Obama speaks in Cairo - AP

Coalition for the International Criminal Court Says We Can No Longer Wait on Justice for Darfur - Talk Radio News Service

Date: 
Jun 4, 2009
Author: 
Tala Dowlatshahi

 The Chief Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court (ICC), Luis Moreno-Ocampo, is this week providing an update to the Security Council regarding the recent ICC’s investigation in Darfur, Sudan. This is the first briefing following the ICC judges’ issuance of an arrest warrant for the President of Sudan, Omar Hassan Ahmad Al-Bashir, in response to allegations of attacks and human rights violations on civilians in Darfur.

The Coalition’s for the ICC’s (CICC’s) Omar Ismail, Advisor of the ENOUGH project based in El-Fashir, Sudan said “The Prosecutor is right. Al-Bashir should be brought to justice. We must end this –it has been six years. It is the government of Sudan against its own people with the intention to do harm.  I know the women who were raped. The marching orders were given by Sudan, dismembered bodies were thrown in water resources.”

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US Reaction to Obama Speech - The Boston Globe

Date: 
Jun 4, 2009
Author: 
Foon Rhee

Domestic reaction to President Obama's Cairo speech is filtering in, and given its sweep and ambition, the reviews are decidedly mixed.

Senator John F. Kerry, chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee, called Obama's speech "blunt" but necessary to put the United States and Muslim countries on a new path.

"President Obama's blunt, honest address in Cairo was absolutely critical in signaling a new era of understanding with Muslim communities worldwide," Kerry said in a statement. "He shattered stereotypes on both sides, reminded the west and the Muslim world of our responsibilities, and reaffirmed one of America's highest ideals and traditional roles -- that those who seek freedom and democracy, Muslim and non-Muslim alike, have no greater friend than the United States of America.

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STATEMENT: Obama Should Have Said More About Darfur

Date: 
Jun 4, 2009

  

For Immediate Release
June 4, 2009

Contact
Eileen White Read, 202.741.6376
eread@enoughproject.org

STATEMENT: Obama Should Have Said More About Darfur

WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Enough Project, the Save Darfur Coalition, and the Genocide Intervention Network today issued the following statement in response to President Barack Obama's remarks in Cairo:

If the Cairo speech was intended to outline shared challenges that America and the Muslim world should confront together, President Obama’s failure to call for a joint push for peace in Sudan is a glaring omission. A passing reference to suffering in Darfur is insufficient.

"The President rightly called the situation in Darfur 'a stain on our collective conscience,'” said Enough Project Executive Director John Norris, "but that is not enough. The president needs to articulate a clear vision of how a lasting peace is going to be achieved for all of Sudan, and demonstrate through his actions rather than just his words that this is a political priority. The situation in Darfur deserves more than a single sentence of the president's attention."

Jerry Fowler, President of the Save Darfur Coalition, noted, "President Obama missed an important opportunity in his Cairo speech to the Muslim world by not reiterating his commitment to lead for peace in Sudan, where 2.7 million Muslim civilians have been driven from their homes and hundreds of thousands have perished because of violence orchestrated by the government. President Obama could have asked all governments in the region to join him in offering a choice to Khartoum between concrete progress toward peace, which will result in improved relations, or continued obstructionism and use of violence, which will lead to increased isolation."

Sam Bell, Executive Director of the Genocide Intervention Network, added, "Candidate Obama promised in his campaign that addressing the situation in Sudan would be a very high priority. I am not sure that all those watching, in the Arab world and at home, will come away with that same impression after today's speech."

Visit the Enough Project’s blog, Enough Said, for updates on this issue.
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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