Sudan and South Sudan

Kaka Town Suffers Damage as Rebels March Towards Paloch

Overview of Kaka, South Sudan(Satellite Sentinel Project/DigitalGlobe)

New Satellite Sentinel Project (SSP) imagery of the strategic town of Kaka in South Sudan’s Upper Nile state confirms the burning of 1071 huts and tukuls and some limited damage to the central market.   Read More »

New Report: Sudan's Tortured Peace Process

Women wait for food rations from WFP in Kaasab camp, Darfur, Sudan. (AP)

As the African Union prepares to reconvene talks between the Sudanese Government and Rebel Leaders, the stakes for peace and for civilians affected by the conflict are higher than ever. February 2014 was the deadliest month for civilians in South Kordofan due to aerial bombardment since 2011.   Read More »

April is Genocide Awareness and Prevention Month

GenPrevCover

April is designated as Genocide Awareness and Prevention Month each year, as it marks important anniversaries for multiple acts of genocide in the 20th century. Throughout the month, individuals and organizations join together to commemorate and honor victims and survivors, educate the public about past and contemporary genocides, and advocate for prevention against future mass atrocities. To support activists as they take action in their communities this April, the Enough Project has teamed up with partner organizations to create a Genocide Awareness and Prevention Month Toolkit.  Read More »

Addressing Root Causes of Sudan’s Wars Key to Sudan Peace Agenda

Date: 
Apr 1, 2014

Enough Project Press Release

Embargoed Until: April 1, 2014, 12:01am EST 

Contact: Carine Umuhumuza, cumuhumuza@enoughproject.org, 202-478-5314

Addressing Root Causes of Sudan’s Wars Key to Sudan Peace Agenda

Washington, DC — As the African Union convenes talks with the Sudanese government and rebel leaders, a new Enough Project report advocates a more comprehensive and inclusive  humanitarian ceasefire and an overall peace process that addresses urgent needs across Sudan’s periphery in a coordinated way. The report, “Sudan’s Tortured Peace Process,” urges African Union and American diplomats to recognize the interconnected nature of Sudan’s conflicts and pursue approaches that recognize the interests of all parties. It argues that a comprehensive approach, addressing marginalization across Sudan, can bring transformative political change that Sudanese people demand.

Sudan’s peace processes are currently segmented, with separate, ineffective frameworks for Darfur and the Two Areas (South Kordofan and Blue Nile). The separate structures fail to reflect the interconnected nature of the rebel coalition and the active conflicts--where a break in hostilities in one area can worsen the fighting elsewhere. As talks on the Two Areas resume in Addis Ababa, rebel leaders seek discussion of broader issues while Sudanese government officials and African Union mediators resist holistic talks. Many groups, including Sudanese civil society organizations, independent international analysts, African Union and European Union leaders, and U.S. officials have endorsed a comprehensive approach. The international community has failed, however, to commit the necessary diplomatic resources to build a broad international coalition to support such a peace process.

As violence escalates and urgent humanitarian needs increase, the divided approach to integrated problems undermines efforts to address urgent humanitarian needs.

Omer Ismail, Enough Project Sudan Advisor, says: 

"The international community has done little to reject this stove-piping of Sudan’s conflicts. As conflicts in Sudan’s periphery worsen, the negotiating parties must stop pursuing this dead-end approach to the peace process that plays directly into Khartoum’s divide and conquer strategy." 

To effectively advance a holistic peace agenda in Sudan, the report recommends that African Union and U.S. leaders take four critical steps: 

1. African Union mediators should unify national dialogues and separate peace processes to comprehensively address conflicts in Darfur, South Kordofan, Blue Nile and eastern Sudan.
2. The U.S. should build an international coalition to push for a comprehensive peace process and boost its diplomatic efforts by deploying an additional U.S. envoy.
3. American lawmakers should pass a measure to allow capacity-building support for Sudan’s opposition and civil society; and 
4. The U.S. should use targeted sanctions and other sources of financial leverage to pressure combatants to pursue a comprehensive peace initiative.

Akshaya Kumar, Enough Project Sudan and South Sudan Analyst, says:

"A divided peace process mounts especially high stakes for civilians living in Sudan’s conflict-affected areas. This year’s rainy season is beginning early, putting millions at risk of food insecurity. An estimated four million in Sudan now face “emergency level” insecurity."

Read the full report, “Sudan’s Tortured Peace Process”: http://www.enoughproject.org/files/SudansTorturedPeaceProcess.pdf

School in Nuba Mountains Bombed for Second Time

The Heiban Bible College, located in the Nuba Mountain region of Sudan, was bombed on March 23, 2014, for the second time in a little over a year. The Nuba Mountains, alongside the Blue Nile region, have been the staging ground for the conflict between the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement-North (SPLM-N) rebel group and the government of Sudan for more than three years.  Read More »

Bombed and Burned: Darfuri Civilians Flee East Jebel Marra En Masse

Destruction in East Jebel Marra (DigitalGlobe)

New Satellite Sentinel Project  imagery provides independent confirmation of Sudan Air Force, or SAF, bombardments in the mountainous Jebel Marra area of North Darfur, where civilians have been bombed for years.  Read More »

The Forgotten Genocidal War in Darfur Revealed in New Satellite Photos

DigitalGlobe imagery - Saraf Omra, North Darfur, Sudan

 Our generation went to college when green “Save Darfur” rubber bracelets were ubiquitous on campuses across the country. Congress passed a unanimous resolution in 2004 declaring that the situation in Darfur amounted to a state-sponsored genocide by proxy Janjaweed militias. We stood on the National Mall and chanted “never again starts right now.” A decade later … Darfur is up in flames once again.  Read More »

Congressional Caucus Calls for Action on South Sudan Violence

On March 20, the Co-Chairs of Congressional Caucus on Sudan and South Sudan including Reps. Barbara Lee (D-CA), Frank Wolf (R-VA), Michael Capuano (D-MA), and Michael McCaul (R-TX), along with 48 other Members of Congress, led a bipartisan letter to the Administration, calling for targeted action and continued engagement on the violence occurring in South Sudan.   Read More »

Op-ed: Another Kind of Surge

A little over three years ago, in advance of the referendum for South Sudan's independence, the great fear of the Sudanese and the broader international community was that the war between the north and south -- a war that was perhaps the second-deadliest globally since World War II -- might reignite.   Read More »

Five Stories You May Have Missed This Week

A weekly round up of must-read stories, posted every Friday.  Read More »

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