Raise Hope for Congo

The Day Women of the Congo Seized Control of the Internet

"From the grassroots women leaders of Congo to the women leaders of the White House," a Change.org petition penned by activist Neema Namadamu in the eastern Congo town of Bukavu has seen a surge in support in recent days. Enough Project partner organization World Pulse, a Portland, Oregon-based women's media group, worked closely the activists in Bukavu, and the World Pulse founder Jensine Larsen wrote this post about the collective effort.  Read More »

29 Smelters Go Conflict Free, More Help from Aerospace Companies Needed

Last week, the electronics industry updated its list of audited conflict-free smelters to 29. This is up from 11 smelters in the Conflict-Free Smelter program, or CFS, at the start of 2012—nearly tripling the size of the program over the past year.  Read More »

Rights Groups Call on Obama to Lead Response to Congo Crisis and Appoint Envoy

Date: 
Dec 10, 2012

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Tracy Fehr, tfehr@enoughproject.org, +1 202-459-1219

WASHINGTON, DC – The Enough Project has joined a coalition of human rights groups calling on President Obama to lead a coordinated U.S. response to the escalating crisis in eastern Congo.

Today, the coalition sent a letter to President Obama asking him to appoint a Presidential Envoy and support the appointment of a U.N. envoy to the Great Lakes region, to support the imposition of sanctions against violators of the U.N. Arms Embargo on Congo, and to cut military assistance and suspend non-humanitarian aid to the government of Rwanda for its support of the M23 insurgency.

The coalition welcomes regional efforts by the International Conference on the Great Lakes Region to find a solution to the crisis, but also recognizes that the regional process’s stopgap approach and reliance on military solutions will not bring sustainable peace to the region. The coalition argues that efforts to achieve a durable peace must be led, not by those who continue to perpetuate the conflict, but rather by a credible internationally facilitated process.

“The current crisis in eastern Congo requires the U.S. to step up its efforts to uphold international law and demonstrate its commitment to human rights,” said John C. Bradshaw, Executive Director of the Enough Project. “Regional intervention in eastern Congo continues to perpetuate a cycle of violence and conflict that cannot be addressed without the support of regional and international actors. The U.S. should appoint a Presidential Envoy to support a credible process that will both cease hostilities and address the underlying economic and political interests to ensure long-term peace and stability for the region.”

#

Enough is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, the Enough Project focuses on crises in Sudan, eastern Congo, and areas of Africa affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough’s strategy papers and briefings provide sharp field analysis and targeted policy recommendations based on a“3P” crisis response strategy: promoting durable peace, providing civilian protection, and punishing perpetrators of atrocities. Enough works with concerned citizens, advocates, and policy makers to prevent, mitigate, and resolve these crises. For more information, please visit www.enoughproject.org.

The Congolese Armed Groups You Aren’t Hearing About

If you have been reading about eastern Congo lately, one name has been stealing headlines: M23. In a dramatic show of force, the Rwanda-supported rebel militia group led by ICC indictee Bosco Ntaganda took control of strategically important Goma in mid- November and then earned a place at the ongoing peace talks in Kampala by ending their 11-day occupation earlier this week.

However, focusing on the M23 belies the complexity of the highly militarized politics of eastern Congo.  Read More »

Follow the Money (and the Minerals)

This piece first appeared as part of New York Times’ "Room for Debate." Enough Project Co-founder John Prendergast and others—including writer Eve Ensler, consultant and analyst Willet Weeks, Kambale Musavuli of Friends of the Congo, Yaa-Lengi Ngemi of the Congo Coalition, and Séverine Autesserre of Columbia University—address the complex question: How to stabilize Congo?  Read More »

Why Eastern Congo Needs a Broadened Peace Process Now: Enough Project Brief

Date: 
Nov 30, 2012

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Tracy Fehr, tfehr@enoughproject.org, +1 202-459-1219

WASHINGTON – Fighting between the M23 rebel movement and the Congolese military escalated last week as the rebel group seized control of Goma, a key city in eastern Congo. To address this growing violence, a broadened peace process including all parties and stakeholders must be initiated that will cease ongoing hostilities and address the systemic drivers of regional conflict, according to an Enough Project policy brief.

Aaron Hall, co-author of the brief and Enough Project Associate Director of Research, said:

“The current conflict in eastern Congo has revealed new evidence of support for armed groups from the governments of Rwanda and Uganda, as well as confirmation evidence of continued mismanagement within the governance and security sectors of Congo. However, the causes and dynamics of the long-standing conflict are unchanged. If the cycle of regional foreign intervention, economic exploitation, and rapacious governance in eastern Congo is not broken, there is no chance for peace in the region.”

The Enough brief argues that regional and international stakeholders must be more directly engaged in supporting a peace process that includes a balance between constructive and coercive leverage to provide the necessary incentives and pressures for compromise between the conflicting parties. The brief highlights the need for a broadened peace process that would be jointly mandated by the U.N., African Union, and the International Conference on the Great Lakes Region, or ICGLR.

John Prendergast, co-author of the brief and co-founder of the Enough Project, said:

"The lack of a credible, effective, internationally mandated and leveraged peace process for the escalating war in Congo is becoming a major reason for that war’s continuation.  The closed-door ICGLR summit between heads of state from Congo, Rwanda and Uganda—without the involvement of political parties, civil society elements, and armed groups representing the diverse voices of eastern Congo—resembles all of the failed deals that came before it through similar processes. A deal between just the biggest guns is unlikely to address the root causes of the conflict in the eastern Congo. Instead, the declaration issued by the heads of state summit at Kampala represents another short-term security agreement that ensures that Congolese President Kabila remains in power while international pressure is removed from Presidents Kagame and Museveni of Rwanda and Uganda, respectively."

The brief outlines considerations for both regional and international actors in creating a framework to work towards peace in eastern Congo. This brief is the first in a three-part Enough Project series on the process, leverage, and substance necessary to create a path towards peace in eastern Congo and the surrounding region.

Read the full brief: “Time for a Broadened Peace Process in Congo

#

Enough is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, the Enough Project focuses on crises in Sudan, eastern Congo, and areas of Africa affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough’s strategy papers and briefings provide sharp field analysis and targeted policy recommendations based on a“3P” crisis response strategy: promoting durable peace, providing civilian protection, and punishing perpetrators of atrocities. Enough works with concerned citizens, advocates, and policy makers to prevent, mitigate, and resolve these crises. For more information, please visit www.enoughproject.org.

Dear President Obama: Congo Needs You Now, Will You Respond?

President Obama speaks at the United Nations headquarters in New York

As we were making our way home to be with family and friends this Thanksgiving, the M23 rebel group backed by Rwanda and Uganda stormed and seized Goma, one of the largest cities in eastern Congo. This is the first time since 2004, at the height of Congo's conflict, that rebels have occupied the city of Goma. A week has gone by, but the U.S. media and government have barely acknowledged this escalating crisis.  Read More »

Video: Former ICC Chief Ocampo Discusses Court with Enough’s John Prendergast

Prendergast and Ocampo sit down for discussion of his work with the ICC

To commend the historic work of the International Criminal Court under the leadership of its first chief prosecutor, Luis Moreno-Ocampo, Jewish World Watch selected Ocampo as the recipient of the group’s 6th annual I Witness Award. Following Ocampo’s remarks, the former chief prosecutor sat down with Enough Project Co-founder John Prendergast for a public interview about the work of the ICC and the specific cases that the court initiated during Ocampo’s tenure.  Read More »

Congo: Diplomatic Efforts to End Crisis Set in Motion, as Fragile Calm Falls on Rebel-held Goma

Residents settled into an uneasy calm today “under our new masters,” a day after mutineers from the Congolese army, now leaders of the M23 military wing, forced government troops, or FARDC, out of the city and took control of the lucrative border crossing between Congo and Rwanda.  Read More »

Field Dispatch: Civilians Under Siege in Goma

On November 20, the M23 rebel group seized Goma, a major city in eastern Congo. This new field dispatch discusses the aftermath of the recent siege and urges the international community to push for high-level committement for a sustainable peace process in the region. 

Congolese citizens look at tank shells after M23 rebel takeover in Goma.
Syndicate content