Raise Hope for Congo

Ebony Magazine Spotlights ‘I Am Congo’ Video Series

This interview originally appeared on Ebony.com. Journalist Rebecca Carroll spoke with Enough Project’s Robert Padavick to discuss the making of Raise Hope for Congo’s new video series, “I Am Congo,” and the motivation behind it.  Read More »

Enough Project Applauds Maryland Conflict Minerals Law

Date: 
May 2, 2012

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Matt Brown, Enough Project, mbrown@enoughproject.org, 202-468-2925

WASHINGTON – The Enough Project commends Maryland for passing a law to curb the global trade in conflict minerals from eastern Congo which fuel ongoing mass atrocities there.

Maryland governor Martin O’Malley signed the bill into law Thursday. The law requires Maryland to not do business with companies that fail to comply with the federal law on conflict minerals, passed in 2010 as part of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform Act. A provision in this federal financial reform legislation requires companies to disclose whether they source minerals from DR Congo or its neighbors and to exercise due diligence on their supply chains to determine if their products are not fueling deadly conflict in the central African country.

The state law adds a powerful incentive for companies to comply with federal law by denying them procurement contracts with the state of Maryland. The bill was introduced by Delegate Shane Robinson.

"This law shows that Maryland cares about the conflict in the Democratic Republic of Congo and that we have a responsibility to do business with companies that value the social consequences of their decisions," Robinson said. "Hopefully, more state legislatures will pass similar laws that send a message that corporations must be held accountable for social, economic, and environmental impacts at home and abroad in order to earn state contracts."

Tin, tungsten, tantalum and gold, all minerals found in consumer electronics, are mined in eastern Congo, where a decade-and-a-half of conflict has resulted in more than 5 million deaths. Armed groups that commit mass rapes and other atrocities make millions of dollars from the minerals trade and control most of the mining operations in a mafia-like cartel.

"The continuous passage of State level legislation in the U.S. shows a growing commitment from consumers and lawmakers to demand that our elected officials and corporate citizens be held responsible for the global impact of investment and supply chain management," said Aaron Hall, Enough Project associate director of research. "Nowhere is this more important than in Eastern Congo, where this demand is manifesting itself in the creation of a reformed mineral sector that will support community and economic growth and decrease violent conflict driven by the trade of conflict minerals."

The Maryland legislation is the second state to deal with Congo conflict minerals after California passed a similar law last year. Similar legislation is also under consideration in Massachusetts. Dozens of college campuses and local governments have passed resolutions pledging to buy only conflict-free products. In June 2010, Stanford University became the first campus in the nation to adopt a policy combating the trade in conflict minerals from Congo.

Congo's Supreme Court Challenges Parliamentary Election Results: Legitimate Justice or International Smokescreen?

On Wednesday, April 25, the Supreme Court of the Democratic Republic of Congo ruled that at least 32 members of Parliament were not rightfully elected to their positions, including 17 members of President Kabila’s ruling alliance and 15 members of the opposition. Nearly 100 additional sitting MP’s may also face legal scrutiny regarding election results.  Read More »

Watch I Am Congo -- Because We're Not in It

On our second trip together to Africa last Thanksgiving, we decided to go to the place where the deadliest war in the world was occurring: the Congo. The entire time we were there, we traveled with an extraordinary Congolese guy named Fidel Bafilemba. His video profile is the first in a new video series being launched by the Enough Project, called “I Am Congo.”  Read More »

INTRODUCING ‘I AM CONGO’

The Enough Project’s Raise Hope for Congo Campaign is proud to present “I Am Congo,” a video series that has been months in the making.  Read More »

Bosco’s Rebellion Flaring Up in Masisi

The mutiny instigated by Bosco Ntaganda of mostly ex-CNDP officers in early April died down relatively quickly across North and South Kivu, with most defectors turning themselves in or being arrested—except for in the Masisi territory. Soon after the rebellion started, Bosco himself retreated to his sanctuary in Masisi and his firm loyalists, who have temporarily flirted with the idea of redeploying elsewhere, are now back in the territory as well.  Read More »

Introducing 'I Am Congo'

Coming soon from Raise Hope for Congo, an Enough Project campaign: "I Am Congo," a groundbreaking video series featuring amazing people living their lives in eastern Congo amid the world's deadliest war.

Coming soon from Raise Hope for Congo, an Enough Project campaign: "I Am Congo," a groundbreaking video series featuring amazing people living their lives in eastern Congo amid the world's deadliest war.

These are stories of hope. These are stories of the people who call Congo home -- in their own words.

I Am Congo launches May 1, 2012 at www.RaiseHopeForCongo.org/IAmCongo

5 Stories You Might Have Missed This Week

A weekly round-up of must-read stories, posted every Friday.  Read More »

With Charles Taylor Conviction, Another Gain for International Justice

After a five year long trial, warlord-turned-president Charles Taylor was convicted yesterday of “aiding and abetting” a rebels notorious for their use of child soldiers and favor terror tactic, amputation, in the vicious 1991-2002 civil war in neighboring Sierra Leone in which an estimated 50,000 people died. The conviction is the first by an international tribunal of a former head of state since the Nuremberg trials of Nazi leaders, a development that was no doubt received with concern by the growing list of former leaders wanted for orchestrating atrocities.  Read More »

Massachusetts Considers Legislation on Conflict Minerals

The Massachusetts-based Congo Action Now group recently claimed some early success in their efforts to usher a new law through the Massachusetts legislature that would bolster the pending federal law on the use of conflict minerals from Congo. Activist and guest blogger Pat Aron writes about their initiative.  Read More »

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