Omar al-Bashir

What the Warrant Means: Justice, Peace, and the Key Actors in Sudan

The issuance of an arrest warrant for Sudan’s sitting head of state for crimes against humanity offers the Obama administration a chance to catalyze multilateral efforts to bring about a solution to Sudan’s decades-long cycle of warfare. One of the crucial missing ingredients to conflict resolution efforts has been some form of accountability for the horrific crimes against humanity that have been perpetrated by the warring parties in Sudan, primarily the Khartoum regime.  Peace without justice in Sudan would only bring an illusion of stability, without addressing the primary forces driving the conflict.

Rudwan Dawod: The Face of Sudan’s Non-Violent Revolution

After enduring 45 days of detainment, beatings, torture, a trial in Sudanese court, and two arrests, Rudwan Dawod is free and back with his family in the United States. And although Dawod’s nightmare is finally over, many other political prisoners and human rights activists in Sudan still remain in custody.  Read More »

Satellites Reveal Destruction of Key Pipeline Infrastructure in Disputed Heglig Oil Field Between the Sudans

Date: 
Apr 22, 2012

Satellite Sentinel Project Press release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Jonathan Hutson, jhutson@enoughproject.org, +1-202-386-1618

WASHINGTON – The Satellite Sentinel Project (SSP) has published new imagery indicating that as Sudan and South Sudan clashed over an oil field near the disputed border town of Heglig, a key part of the pipeline infrastructure was destroyed. The damage appears to be so severe, and in such a critical part of the oil infrastructure, that it would likely stop oil flow in the area, according to SSP.

Based on Harvard Humanitarian Initiative analysis of DigitalGlobe satellite imagery, SSP has concluded that what appears to be an oil collection manifold – equipment which allows for the diversion or combination of oil flows without interruption – was apparently blown up in some type of explosion. SSP says it cannot make a determination whether the damage resulted from aerial bombardment or ground action. Both nations have accused the other of deliberately damaging the oil field. Both sides claim sovereignty over Heglig, which South Sudan refers to as Panthou.

SSP stated: “The destroyed structure appears consistent with a collection manifold because of its shape and its location at the junction of multiple pipelines. The destruction of this particular collection manifold would likely result in the immediate cessation of oil flow in the area.”

Enough Project Co-founder John Prendergast said:

As the conflict has escalated over the last few weeks, the costs now include both lost lives and damaged oil infrastructure. As the losses pile up on both sides, the danger of a full-scale war continues to increase.

Enough Project Executive Director John C. Bradshaw said:

This destruction of oil infrastructure benefits neither side. To avoid the mutually disastrous consequences of an all-out war, both Sudans must return to the negotiating table to iron out a comprehensive peace deal that resolves the underlying issues, including border demarcation and oil revenue sharing.

After reportedly repulsing an attack by Sudan Armed Forces (SAF) on Sudan People’s Liberation Army (SPLA) positions in the town of Teshwin, on the South Sudanese border, SPLA retaliated by advancing into Heglig on 9 April 2012.

On 15 April, South Sudan's information minister, Barnaba Marial Benjamin, told reporters in Juba that the aerial bombardment of the oil facility in the Heglig region had caused serious damage. He stated, “They are bombing the central processing facility and the [oil] tanks to rubble as we speak.” On 20 April, South Sudan’s military spokesman, Col. Philip Aguer, announced that SPLA would withdraw from Heglig within three days. On 21 April, Sudan’s Acting Minister of Information, Sana Hamad, reported that the Government of Sudan possessed evidence of intentional sabotage to the oil installations carried out by forces of the SPLA.

Harvard Carr Center for Human Rights Policy Executive Director Charlie Clements, MD, said:

“The continuing conflict between Sudan and South Sudan endangers the human security of civilians on both sides of the border.”

Read the latest SSP report, Pipeline: Evidence of the Destruction of Key Oil Infrastructure in Heglig: http://satsentinel.org/report/pipeline-evidence-destruction-key-oil-infrastructure-heglig

View or download DigitalGlobe satellite imagery: http://www.flickr.com/photos/enoughproject/sets/72157629504710896/with/6954029742/

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About the Satellite Sentinel Project 

The Satellite Sentinel Project, http://satsentinel.org, combines satellite imagery analysis and field reports with Google’s Map Maker to deter the resumption of full-scale civil war between North and South Sudan and to hold all parties accountable for human rights crimes. Not On Our Watch provided seed money to launch SSP. The Enough Project contributes field reports and policy analysis, and, together with Not On Our Watch, pressures policymakers by urging the public to act. Google and Trellon collaborated to design the web platform. Harvard Humanitarian Initiative provides research and leads the collection, human rights analysis, and corroboration of on-the-ground reports that contextualizes the imagery. DigitalGlobe provides satellite imagery and additional analysis.

 

Satellites Show Buildup of Sudanese Military Strike Aircraft in Range of South Sudan and Evidence of Reported Looting in Heglig

Date: 
Apr 23, 2012

Satellite Sentinel Project Press release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Jonathan Hutson, jhutson@enoughproject.org, +1-202-386-1618

WASHINGTON – The Satellite Sentinel Project (SSP) has published new imagery confirming that the Government of Sudan has dramatically increased the number of military strike aircraft at two airbases and that many are in range to fly deep into South Sudan. SSP has also documented, through the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative’s analysis of DigitalGlobe satellite imagery, craters consistent with reports that Sudan Armed Forces (SAF) aerially bombarded an apparent civilian area near a strategic bridge in Bentiu, the capital of Unity State, South Sudan.

SSP has also identified visual evidence consistent with reports of looting by Sudan People’s Liberation Army (SPLA) and southern-aligned forces at a SAF military base in the disputed border town of Heglig. The destruction or seizure of enemy property may violate international law governing the conduct of land warfare.

SSP concluded that the military aircraft identified at Sudan’s airbases in El Obeid, North Kordofan, and Kadugli, South Kordofan, “may represent a significant portion” of SAF’s total combat-capable air assets. SSP states that at Sudan’s El Obeid airbase, it found five Sukhoi Su-25 attack aircraft, five apparent MiG-29 fighters, three Nanchang Q-5 fighters, and three Antonov transport aircraft of the type that SAF reportedly uses as bombers. SSP also identified eight Mi-24 helicopter gunships, at SAF’s airbases in El Obeid and Kadugli.

Enough Project  Co-founder John Prendergast said:

The increased concentration of Sudanese army and air force firepower within striking distance of its border with South Sudan signifies that we may not have yet seen the worst of the fighting. It is imperative that crisis diplomacy be enhanced, in particular by finding a way for China and the US to work together in support of a negotiated stand-down. Ultimately, the only way full-scale war will be averted is if a comprehensive peace deal can be struck that addresses the issues dividing Sudan and South Sudan, creates a process to address the escalating civil war within Sudan, and ends proxy support to each other’s rebels. If any of these issues is left unaddressed, the Sudans will continue to burn.

Harvard Carr Center for Human Rights Policy  Executive Director Charlie Clements, MD, said:

“This report documents evidence of disregard for basic laws of war by all parties to this widening conflict. All parties have responsibilities under international law to protect civilian lives and property.”

Read the latest SSP report, Escalation: Evidence of SAF and SPLA Combat Operations: http://satsentinel.org/report/escalation-evidence-saf-and-spla-combat-operations

View or download DigitalGlobe satellite imagery: http://www.flickr.com/photos/enoughproject/sets/72157629513977712/with/6958153848/

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About the Satellite Sentinel Project

The Satellite Sentinel Project, http://satsentinel.org, combines satellite imagery analysis and field reports with Google’s Map Maker to deter the resumption of full-scale civil war between North and South Sudan and to hold all parties accountable for human rights crimes. Not On Our Watch provided seed money to launch SSP. The Enough Project contributes field reports and policy analysis, and, together with Not On Our Watch, pressures policymakers by urging the public to act. Google and Trellon collaborated to design the web platform. Harvard Humanitarian Initiative provides research and leads the collection, human rights analysis, and corroboration of on-the-ground reports that contextualizes the imagery. DigitalGlobe provides satellite imagery and additional analysis.

Enough Project Petitions African Union to Take Action on Sudan Atrocities

Date: 
Apr 20, 2012

Press release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Matt Brown, mbrown@enoughproject.org, +1-202-468-2925

WASHINGTON – The Enough Project filed a petition on April 20 against the Republic of Sudan seeking to bring attention to the widespread human rights abuses that the Sudanese government is perpetrating against its own people in the states of South Kordofan and Blue Nile.

The petition, filed before the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights, alleges that the government of Sudan’s intentional bombing of civilians and denial of international humanitarian aid to populations living in the two states constitute violations of, among other things, the rights to life and property afforded these civilians under the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights.

“Khartoum’s forces have deliberately bombed civilian homes, schools and clinics in direct violation of Sudan’s obligations under not only the African Charter, but also international human rights law and international humanitarian law,” said John Bradshaw, Enough Project executive director. “Exacerbating the situation is Khartoum’s steadfast refusal to permit international organizations to deliver desperately needed humanitarian or food aid to civilians resulting in emergency levels of food insecurity.”

When the African Commission convenes this week for one of its ordinary sessions, Sudan will submit a report on its human rights record. The draft document, recently released, contains not a word about the government’s siege in Blue Nile and South Kordofan.  At the same meeting, the Commission will consider the Enough Project’s petition, which describes a starkly different reality.

“The petition provides the African Union and the broader international community the opportunity to closely examine the most recent atrocities committed by the Sudanese government against its own people,” said Mark Quarterman, Enough Project director of research. “Dismayingly, these atrocities are nothing new; rather, they are the latest iteration in a pattern of human rights violations that Khartoum has committed against Sudanese civilians in South Sudan, South Kordofan, Blue Nile, the Abyei Area, Beja, and Darfur since at least the early 1990s.”

The international community should also take actions in the immediate term to provide technical assistance to Sudan’s opposition parties so as to enable those parties to constructively engage in political processes that will eventually allow for a fair, transparent, and inclusive constitutional process and democratic elections. 

“The time has come for the atrocities and cycle of impunity to end, and for democratic transformation to take hold in Sudan,” said Omer Ismail, Enough Project Sudan advisor. “Without a transition to a truly democratic government in Sudan, the Khartoum regime’s pattern of oppression and destruction against marginalized populations will continue as it has for decades.”

Read the full petition.

British Documentary Reveals Dramatic Evidence of Sudanese Crimes in South Kordofan

A new British documentary film presents graphic visual evidence that the Sudanese government has committed crimes against humanity by bombarding civilians in the Nuba Mountains of South Kordofan, Sudan. "Unreported World: Terror in Sudan" will premiere on the UK's Channel 4 on Friday, April 13 and Channel 4 reporter Aidan Hartley agreed to answer five questions from Enough Said.  Read More »

Two Sudans on the Brink of War?

Once again, relations between Sudan and South Sudan are teetering on the brink of war. Over the past week, fighting along the border between the two nations, and aerial bombardment by the Sudanese Armed Forces, or SAF, deep into the territory of South Sudan have nearly destroyed rising hopes that the two countries would strike a deal in the near future on outstanding disputes. However, some hope still lives on in Juba, the capital of South Sudan, where officials cling to the possibility that Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir will proceed with his visit to Juba on April 3 for a tête-à-tête with South Sudan’s President Salva Kiir.  Read More »

George Clooney, Members of Congress, Human Rights and Faith Leaders Arrested Protesting at Sudanese Embassy

Date: 
Mar 16, 2012

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Allyson Neville-Morgan, United to End Genocide

anevillemorgan@endgenocide.org, 202-368-9387

Matt Brown, Enough Project

mbrown@enoughproject.org, 202-468-2925

Sudanese President's Food & Aid Blockade Threatens 500,000 Lives

Washington, D.C. – George Clooney, President of United to End Genocide and former Congressman Tom Andrews, Congressmen Jim McGovern (D-MA), Al Green (D-TX), Jim Moran (D-VA) and John Olver (D-MA), Martin Luther King III, NAACP President Ben Jealous, Enough Project Co-Founder John Prendergast, and other human rights and faith leaders were arrested today for civil disobedience outside of the Sudanese Embassy while protesting the escalating humanitarian emergency in Sudan that threatens the lives of 500,000 people.

These leaders demanded that Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir immediately end the blockade that is preventing food and humanitarian aid from reaching the people of Sudan’s Nuba Mountains and Blue Nile regions. Bashir’s forces created the dire food shortage in the region—predicted by USAID to reach near-famine levels this month—by bombing fields and preventing villagers from planting crops in July and August last year.

After speaking on the steps of the embassy to hundreds of activists, members of Congress and activist leaders were asked by police to leave the scene. When the protest continued, officers arrested those who would not comply. Additional participants arrested in the civil disobedience included Nick Clooney, Jewish Council for Public Affairs President Rabbi Steve Gutow, Religious Action Center for Reform Judaism Director Rabbi David Saperstein, Jewish World Watch Executive Director Fred Kramer, and American Jewish World Service Associate Director of Policy Ian Schwab.

Bishop Andudu Adam Elnail, a Nuban leader from South Kordofan, Sudan addressed the crowd at the embassy, along with Darfuri activist and United to End Genocide Director of Global Partnerships Niemat Ahmadi, and Sudanese activist for Darfur and Enough Project Senior Advisor Omer Ismail. Dr. Richard Land, President of The Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention, and TransAfrica Forum President Nicole Lee also spoke.

“We are protesting to make sure the Sudanese government knows that the world is watching,” states Congressman Jim McGovern. “The United States Congress is watching. And we will be back again and again until they stop using food as a weapon; stop slaughtering innocent men, women and children; and stop spitting in the face of the world community.”

John Prendergast, co-founder of the Enough Project, says: “George Clooney and I just returned from the Nuba Mountains, where the Sudan government regularly bombs civilians and blocks humanitarian aid to the war-torn regions along the border with South Sudan. It is urgent that the Khartoum government allow aid access. More broadly, the window is now open for a comprehensive political settlement on all the issues that divide Sudan and South Sudan, and the U.S. is playing an important role in supporting that effort.”

“It is unacceptable and inexcusable that Sudan’s President Omar al-Bashir—an internationally criminal  wanted for war crimes and genocide—is getting away with bombing, starving and displacing hundreds of thousands of innocent men, women and children in Sudan’s Nuba Mountains and Blue Nile State,” says United to End Genocide President Tom Andrews. “We need to hear the outrage from President Obama and see robust international leadership. The United States should immediately do everything in its power to get food to the region before people starve and increase sanctions on Bashir and his forces.”

“We should not allow the tragedy of Darfur to be repeated. Hundreds of thousands of people died before the international community and United States took action. The question for the people in the Nuba Mountains and Blue Nile is will the U.S. government act now, or will the response be too little, too late,” states United to End Genocide Director of Global Partnerships Niemat Ahmadi who is originally from Darfur, Sudan.

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The Save Darfur Coalition and Genocide Intervention Network are now United to End Genocide. The organization remains committed to its work to end the crisis in Darfur and bring peace to all of Sudan as well as to end violence in other areas of mass atrocities.  United to End Genocide is building the largest activist organization in America dedicated to ending genocide and mass atrocities worldwide, with a membership base of hundreds of thousands of committed activists, an unparalleled nationwide student movement, more than 190 faith-based, advocacy and human rights partner organizations, and a network of institutional investors collectively representing more than $3 trillion in assets under management.

This Week in Washington: Clooney Shines a Spotlight on War Crimes in Sudan

George Clooney is using his star power to shine a spotlight on the war crimes and humanitarian crisis taking place in Sudan. He is making his rounds this week in Washington, D.C., fresh from a trip to Sudan and South Sudan with Enough Project Co-founder John Prendergast.  Read More »

When Torture Survivors Turn the Tables

Activist, restaurateur, and guest blogger Magdy el-Baghdady recently returned to London from Khartoum, where he was detained in one of Sudan's most infamous prisons: Kober. He offered this horrifying insider's perspective on the violence prisoners there endure. Please be aware that some of el-Baghdady's descriptions are graphic.  Read More »

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