John Prendergast

A New U.S. Policy for Two New Sudans

After a decades-long deadly struggle for freedom, South Sudanese celebrated for days over the realization of their dream of independent statehood. A new U.S. policy—rooted in the international responsibility to protect civilian life and democracy promotion—is desperately needed for these two new Sudans.

Why a Certification Process for Conflict Minerals is Urgent: A View from North Kivu

This report, based on interviews conducted by John Prendergast and Fidel Bafilemba in North Kivu in November 2010, provides an overview of the extent to which the minerals trade from eastern Congo today remains dominated by a mafia network of military, political, and business interests in Congo, its neighbors, and within the supply chains that connect the mines to international markets.

‘Congo’s Enough Moment’: New Report on Conflict Minerals Makes Case for Certification and Army Reform

Date: 
Oct 19, 2010

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Jonathan Hutson, jhutson@enoughproject.org, Mobile: +1-202-386-1618
 
 
WASHINGTON, D.C. – As a growing consumer movement demands cell phones and gadgets that are guaranteed to be free of conflict minerals that fuel mass rape by armed groups in eastern Congo, human rights activists see an opportunity to end the exploitation of Congo’s people and the pillaging of its resources.
 
In a new report, “Congo’s Enough Moment: The Case for Conflict Minerals Certification and Army Reform,” Enough Project Co-founder John Prendergast argues that the spotlight of international attention to Congo and widespread interest in conflict minerals has opened a window for policy reform.
 
“The new U.S. law on conflict minerals and the growing, global campaign have shaken up the supply chain, and many of those who have been profiting now say they are willing to change,” says Prendergast. “Now the U.S. government and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton must help leverage the end of the war in eastern Congo through leadership on two of the issues that will catalyze a broader solution to the cycles of violence there: minerals certification and comprehensive army reform.”
 
“The objective of minerals certification is to change the commercial calculus from violence to stability, from smuggling to legality, from collapsed state to rebuilding state, from private bank accounts to public revenues,” says Prendergast. He argues that a regional effort to create a system that improves on the model developed ten years ago to stop the blood diamonds that fueled wars in Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Angola merits sustained support.
 
Prendergast also argues that security sector reform is crucial, and that three keys to army reform are troop training, including in human rights law; adequate and reliable payment of troops; and holding soldiers accountable for war crimes and other crimes against civilian populations.
 
“There needs to be real accountability for commanders and armed group leaders, and their troops, not an atmosphere of impunity in the face of human rights crimes,” says Prendergast. “This requires serious investigations, naming and shaming, and prosecuting those that deserve it.”
 
 
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Enough is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, the Enough Project focuses on crises in Sudan, eastern Congo, and areas of Africa affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough’s strategy papers and briefings provide sharp field analysis and targeted policy recommendations based on a “3P” crisis response strategy: promoting durable peace, providing civilian protection, and punishing perpetrators of atrocities. Enough works with concerned citizens, advocates, and policy makers to prevent, mitigate, and resolve these crises. For more information, please visit www.enoughproject.org.

Congo's Enough Moment

At rare moments during the course of a war, a confluence of factors come together to provide a window of opportunity for real conflict transformation. Now Congo has a unique opportunity to bring an end to more than 125 years of having its people and resources pillaged by colonial powers, international traders, neighbors, and foreign and domestic armed groups.

Getting Specific About Accountability in Sudan

Date: 
Sep 24, 2010

The Huffington Post: Getting Specific About Accountability in Sudan

By: John Prendergast, Co-authored by: Ashley Benner

It has become almost obligatory for policy-makers and pundits to talk about accountability and breaking the cycle of impunity. However, when it comes to specific action, it has been a long time since the United States has done anything to support real accountability and justice on the ground in Sudan. With the South Sudan and Abyei referenda scheduled for January 9 -- less than four months from now -- and with the accompanying potential for renewed war and human rights violations, the U.S. must commit to doing all it can to prevent war and secure justice in Sudan.
 

Keeping reading this Huffington Post article.

Avoiding the Train Wreck in Sudan: U.S. Leverage for Peace

As part of its Sudan Working Group Series, the Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars released today a paper entitled, “Avoiding the Train Wreck in Sudan: U.S. Leverage for Peace,” as part of a two-piece publication examining international engagement in Sudan.

Report: What’s Wrong with U.S. Policy Toward Sudan, and How to Fix It

Date: 
Jul 20, 2010
Author: 
John Prendergast

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Jonathan Hutson, jhutson@enoughproject.org, +1-202-386-1618
 

Report: What's Wrong with U.S. Policy Toward Sudan, and How to Fix It

WASHINGTON, D.C. -The Enough Project has released a new report that argues that U.S. policy is not contributing in a meaningful way to creating peace and justice in Sudan, and suggests alternative steps that officials can take to make peace in Sudan a reality.

With only six months until the self-determination referenda for South Sudan and Abyei, the report describes how U.S. policymakers have failed to act decisively to prevent a return to war between North and South Sudan, or to resolve the escalating conflict in Darfur.

In the report, titled, “What’s Wrong with U.S. Policy Toward Sudan, and How to Fix It,” Enough Co-founder John Prendergast argues that the words and actions of U.S. officials have undermined the administration’s influence in Sudan, just when its efforts are needed most.

“The time has come for an urgent rethink of how the United States can contribute to peace in Sudan now, building on the lessons of the recent past,” writes Prendergast.

The report outlines four specific areas where U.S. policy is off course. These include a flawed peace process in Darfur, a hands-off approach to critical negotiations to prevent renewed North-South war, the role of the Unites States in building leverage for peace, and justice as an essential component of sustainable peace.

“The United States made a major contribution to peace-making in Sudan in the past decade,” argues Prendergast. “Sadly, the Obama administration is not building on the lessons of past success and thus is not positioning itself to play the role that is needed in averting all-out war in 2011.”

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Enough is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, the Enough Project focuses on crises in Sudan, eastern Congo, and areas of Africa affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough’s strategy papers and briefings provide sharp field analysis and targeted policy recommendations based on a “3P” crisis response strategy: promoting durable peace, providing civilian protection, and punishing perpetrators of atrocities. Enough works with concerned citizens, advocates, and policy makers to prevent, mitigate, and resolve these crises. For more information, please visit www.enoughproject.org.

 

 

What's Wrong with U.S. Policy toward Sudan, and How to Fix It

The time has come for an urgent rethink of how the United States can contribute to peace in Sudan now, building on the lessons of the recent past.

U.S. Congress Passes Anti-LRA Bill - Daily Monitor

Date: 
May 13, 2010
The U.S. Congress has passed a bill calling upon the administration of President Barack Obama to lead international efforts to end the threat to civilians posed by the Lord's Resistance Army (LRA). The bill was passed late yesterday. 
 

A joint statement from US-based organisations, The Enough Project, Resolve Uganda and Invisible Children, says the legislation demonstrates Americans' broad and deep determination to see new action from President Obama to help arrest Joseph Kony and other top LRA commanders. The statement says the bill provides support to disarm and disband Kony’s militia, and to restore stability to those areas of Africa that have been terrorised by the LRA. 

Keep reading at the Daily Monitor.

In Wake of Rigged Election, Rights Groups Call on White House to Take Firm Stance to Ensure Peace and Justice in Sudan

Date: 
Apr 20, 2010
Author: 
Jonathan Hutson

Contacts:
Jonathan Hutson, the Enough Project, 202-386-1618, jhutson@enoughproject.org
Andrea Clarke, Save Darfur Coalition, 202-460-6756, andrea@savedarfur.org
Susan Morgan, Investors Against Genocide, 617-797-0451, susan@paxcommunications.org
Suzanne Offen, American Jewish World Service, 240- 620- 5207, soffen@ajws.org

 

IN WAKE OF RIGGED ELECTION, RIGHTS GROUPS CALL ON WHITE HOUSE TO TAKE FIRM STANCE TO ENSURE PEACE AND JUSTICE IN SUDAN

U.S. Should Increase Pressure on Recalcitrant Actors To Reduce Risk of Full-Scale War, as Per Sudan Policy

 

WASHINGTON, D.C. – As the White House issued a statement that Sudan’s recent elections fell short of international standards and that political rights and freedoms were violated, leading human rights groups are calling on the Obama Administration to implement a policy of pressure and consequences to reduce the risk of full-scale war and prevent further manipulation by spoilers in Khartoum during the run-up to the January 2011 referendum on independence for Southern Sudan.

Mark Lotwis, Acting President, Save Darfur Coalition: “The Obama administration’s strategy for Sudan promised to hold Sudan’s regime accountable for its actions on the ground. Yet today’s statement neglects to assign responsibility and consequences for the failure of dictator Omar al-Bashir to create the conditions for a free and fair election. President Obama must lead world leaders to not recognize Bashir as a legitimately elected leader and to press for meaningful steps towards political freedom in Sudan in the run up to next year’s referendum to determine independence for South Sudan.”

John Prendergast, Enough: “Each time the Obama administration does not stand on principle and build international consequences for further abuses of human and civil rights, a powerful signal is sent to the Sudanese parties that fulfillment of commitments and agreements is not important. Unless President Obama implements his own stated policy of imposing consequences for unmet benchmarks, the potential increases for obstructions around the referendum and Darfur peace negotiations and thus a return to full-scale national war. The stakes continue to get higher in Sudan, and the administration's bar for moving forward continues to get lower."

Ruth Messinger, President, American Jewish World Service: “The elections are over and fundamentally little has changed. Darfur remains without a viable peace process, a host of issues remain unresolved ahead of the referendum in January and the NCP government once again confirmed its refusal to allow a true democratic transformation in Sudan. The administration must demonstrate that peace in Sudan is a priority worthy of the continued personal attention of the President, Vice President and Secretary of State."

Gabriel Stauring, Director, Stop Genocide Now: “Marginalized people in Sudan are being left behind and unprotected, in this rush to meet a time-line. U.S. Sudan policy is, in effect, promoting abuses and impunity, when it does not go beyond statements of regret and move towards true consequences and pressures. As we have seen with recent attacks in the Jebel Marra region of Darfur where hundreds died and thousands were displaced, real lives are at stake, and regrets do not do the job.

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The Save Darfur Coalition is an alliance of more than 190 faith-based, advocacy and human rights organizations – raises public awareness about the ongoing crisis in Darfur and mobilizes a unified response to promote peace throughout the Darfur region and all of Sudan. The coalition’s member organizations represent 130 million people of all ages, races, religions and political affiliations united together to help the people of Sudan. Please join the movement at www.SaveDarfur.org.

Enough is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on crises in Sudan, Chad, eastern Congo, northern Uganda, Somalia, and Zimbabwe. Enough’s strategy papers and briefings provide sharp field analysis and targeted policy recommendations based on a “3P” crisis response strategy: promoting durable peace, providing civilian protection, and punishing perpetrators of atrocities. Enough works with concerned citizens, advocates, and policy makers to prevent, mitigate, and resolve these crises. For more information, visit www.enoughproject.org.

Stop Genocide Now is a grassroots community dedicated to working to protect populations in grave danger of violence, death and displacement resulting from genocide. Through active education, advocacy and policy change SGN resolves to change the way the world responds to genocide. SGN is currently focused on creating awareness and action to stop the genocide in Darfur and deal appropriately with its aftermath. All of our projects focus on and utilize the strength and power in grassroots connectivity. For more information, please visit www.stopgenocidenow.org
 

American Jewish World Service is an international development organization motivated by Judaism's imperative to pursue justice. AJWS is dedicated to alleviating poverty, hunger and disease among the people of the developing world regardless of race, religion or nationality. Through grants to grassroots organizations, volunteer service, advocacy and education, AJWS fosters civil society, sustainable development and human rights for all people, while promoting the values and responsibilities of global citizenship within the Jewish community. www.ajws.org

 

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