Conflict Minerals

Coming Clean: A Proposal for Getting Conflict Minerals Certification on Track

Tremendous strides have been made in recent years to cut the conflict minerals trade in eastern Congo. In the past four years, governments, nonprofits, and private sector actors in Africa, the U.S., and Europe have built regulatory frameworks and stimulated the global market for responsibly sourced minerals. This report explores how to get the certification process on track in order to bring peace, security, and regional economic growth to the region. 

Activist Brief: Striking Gold - Why the Illicit Gold Trade in Congo Matters

This activist brief provides details and talking points on the illicit conflict gold trade and the M23 rebel group's involvement. It explains how M23 and its allies took over took over a profitable part of the conflict gold trade in the eastern region of the Democratic Republic of the Congo.


Conflict Gold

Legislators Stand Up for Conflict-Free Minerals on the Hill

Last week, a number of current and former members of Congress joined the fight over the provision of the Dodd-Frank Act which requires corporationsto become more transparent and clean up their supply chains.   Read More »

New Evidence: M23 Rebels in Congo Conflict Gold Trade

Date: 
Oct 9, 2013

Enough Project Press Release

Embargoed Until: October 9, 2013 7pm EST/October 10, 2013 Midnight GMT

Contact: Carine Umuhumuza, cumuhumuza@enoughproject.org, 202-478-5314

New Evidence: M23 Rebels in Congo Conflict Gold Trade

The Enough Project has released a groundbreaking new report that documents the conflict gold smuggling network of the Eastern Congo-based M23 rebels. The report, “Striking Gold: How M23 and its Allies are Infiltrating Congo's Gold Trade,” reveals how M23 is involved in the lucrative gold trade in eastern Congo, which is worth approximately $500 million per year overall.  Instead of controlling mines directly, M23 has built alliances with other armed groups in gold-rich areas and expanded its contacts with influential traders in Uganda, Burundi, and Congo to trade gold. The report calls on U.S. Special Envoy Russ Feingold, the U.N. Security Council, U.N. Envoy Mary Robinson, and jewelry retailers to take concrete measures to limit the documented paths of conflict gold to international markets.

Striking Gold” identifies four main gold exporters whose business operations enable M23 and other armed groups to profit from the gold trade, according to UN experts reports and Enough Project research. The report also names militia leaders, including M23 commander Sultani Makenga, who play a key role in the illicit trade. Makenga has built on the networks of former M23 co-commander Bosco Ntaganda and has extended alliances that cut across otherwise hostile ethnic and political divisions.

Ruben de Koning, co-author of the report, says, “Some of the major official gold exporters in Uganda and Burundi indirectly purchase smuggled gold from M23 and allied armed groups in violation of the U.N. arms embargo, and without exercising any due diligence on the origin of their gold. Sanctions against these individual exporters, as opposed to companies, would help prevent sanctioned owners from merely reinventing themselves under a new company name in order to continue operations. U.S. and U.N. sanctions would make it harder for M23 and other armed groups to finance their struggle, and compel others to start mitigating such risk.”

Sasha Lezhnev, Senior Policy Analyst at the Enough Project, says, “M23's deadly gold may be entering our jewelry stores or banks, which make up 80 percent of the global gold market. The U.S. government and jewelers can help stem this problem at its root.  U.S. envoy Russ Feingold should press Congo, Rwanda, and the Great Lakes region to finalize their certification system to weed out conflict gold. Jewelers must also step up efforts to build a clean gold trade in Congo by joining public-private alliances and tech company projects like 'Solutions for Hope.'”

M23 allies have consolidated control over mines, particularly those in Walikale and Lubero territories in North Kivu province and in Ituri district in Orientale province. The growing revenues have enriched those who perpetrate atrocities and crimes against humanity in the region. M23 and its allies have also secured cross-border transit routes for smuggling to Bujumbura, Burundi, and Kampala, Uganda, both important regional hubs for international gold markets.

De Koning adds, “The ball is in the court of the U.S. government and U.N. Security Council to sanction these known exporters. Responsibility also lies with the downstream gold industry to conduct proper due diligence and invest in a clean gold trade in Congo.”

Read the full report, "Striking Gold: How M23 and its Allies are Infiltrating Congo's Gold Trade": http://www.enoughproject.org/files/StrikingGold-M23-and-Allies-Infiltrating-Congo-Gold-Trade.pdf

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The Enough Project is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on the crises in Sudan, South Sudan, eastern Congo, and areas affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough conducts intensive field research, develops practical policies to address these crises, and shares sensible tools to empower citizens and groups working for change. To learn more about Enough, go to www.enoughproject.org.

Striking Gold: How M23 and its Allies are Infiltrating Congo's Gold Trade

The M23 rebel group has taken over a profitable part of the conflict gold trade in the east of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, or DRC, argues a new Enough Project report.

Think Progress: Packers Quarterback Aaron Rodgers Joins Campaign To Raise Awareness About Technology And Congo

Aaron Rodgers (ThinkProgress)

On homecoming week here at the University of Wisconsin, a local football star had campus celebrating.   Read More »

National Geographic on Conflict Minerals: Opportunity to Grow the Clean Minerals Trade in Congo

A child is put to work at a militia-run mine in Watsa | Marcus Bleasdale

The latest issue of National Geographic magazine, the 125th Anniversary Collector’s Edition “Photography Issue,” explores the role conflict minerals play in the violence in eastern Congo.  Read More »

Joint NGO Position Paper: Breaking the Links

This group of 58 European and global non-governmental organizations calls on the European Commission to adopt legislation requiring European business entities to conduct supply chain due diligence in order to ensure that they do not contribute to conflict financing or human rights abuses in the production and trade in natural resources. Such legislation should, at a minimum, meet international standards endorsed by the United Nations and by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and reflect principles contained within the European Union's own Corporate Social Responsibility strategy.

Joint NGO Position Paper: Breaking the Links

New Report: Expectations for Companies' Conflict Minerals Reporting

Today, the Enough Project along with the Responsible Sourcing Network released a report,"Expectations for Companies' Conflict Minerals Reporting", that articulates key reporting components that are important to socially responsible investors and rights groups who have been advocates for a clean minerals trade.  Read More »

Expectations for Companies' Conflict Minerals Reporting

As companies prepare their first required reports on conflict mineral use to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, SEC, Responsible Sourcing Network and the Enough Project released a report that sets expectations for the contents of the inaugural reports required by Section 1502 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act.

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