Displacement

"RESTORE 2100" Calories Campaign and Refugee Rations Report from i-ACT

Partner organization i-ACT has launched the "RESTORE 2100" (calories) campaign and published their Refugee Rations Report in response to cuts to food rations for Sudanese refugees living in eastern Chad. In 2014, food rations were cut from the World Food Program-recommended 2,100 calories per person, per day to approximately 800 calories per person, per day, which is having dramatic effects on the lives of the refugees.  Read More »

Enough Forum: Life Under Siege - South Kordofan Needs Assessment

For the third year running, the Enough Project is publishing a needs assessment conducted by anonymous researchers with access to rebel-held parts of Sudan’s South Kordofan state. An independent humanitarian expert has endorsed the methodology of the study, “Life Under Siege” which paints a holistic picture of a place where internationals are not given permission to enter.

Extermination By Design: The Case for Crimes Against Humanity In Sudan's Nuba Mountains

Our policy analyst Akshaya Kumar argues that the desperate situation of the people in rebel-controlled areas, the Sudanese government’s aid blockade, and indiscriminate attacks on civilians, along with statements recently attributed to senior commanders in the government forces, lay the foundation for a case of crimes against humanity by extermination.

Daily Beast Op-Ed: ‘The Good Lie’ and the Hard Truths of South Sudan

The Good Lie should be about the past. Unfortunately, a new war, rooted in the embers of the one that brought the Lost Boys and Girls to America, has engulfed South Sudan today.  Read More »

Spreading News by Boda Boda: An Innovative Approach to Meeting the Needs of Internally Displaced Persons in Juba, South Sudan

Approximately 94,000 people are displaced and sheltering in U.N. bases throughout South Sudan as a result of ongoing conflict. In the midst of dire conditions and grave humanitarian needs, the agencies at one Protection of Civilians site in Tong Ping, Juba have found a simple yet highly effective approach to meeting the information needs of internally displaced persons– broadcasting news from roving “boda boda” motorbikes.  Read More »

A Doctor's View from a Foxhole in Sudan

The aftermath of the bombing, Photo by author

I'm a doctor, not a writer. But the situation I witnessed while volunteering in the Nuba Mountains of Sudan compels me to write and tell the story of what is happening there. Since 2011, the only hospital in the entire Nuba Mountains region, Mother of Mercy in Gidel, had been spared bombardment – until last month.   Read More »

Brazen Assault Caught on Camera As Security Council Debates Darfur Peacekeeping Mission

UN Photo/Albert González Farran

New photographs smuggled out of Darfur show uniformed Sudanese security forces brazenly assaulting Darfuris living in El Salam camp for the internally displaced. The camp, on the outskirts of Nyala in South Darfur, is host to tens of thousands who fled their homes due to violence. The recent assault was carried out last week under the pretense of a disarmament campaign. However, Abu Sharati, spokesman for the camp residents' association argues "the main objective of this attack is terrorising the camp population and dismantling the camp."  Read More »

Omer Ismail Speaks at Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission Briefing on Sudan

Omer Ismail presents at a Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission briefing in the U.S

On May 20, Enough Project Senior Advisor Omer Ismail presented at a Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission briefing in the U.S. House of Representatives. The briefing, which included former U.S. Special Envoy for Sudan and South Sudan Princeton Lyman and citizen journalist Ryan Boyette, focused on the ongoing human rights violations and the escalation of violence throughout Sudan.  Read More »

Daily Beast Op-ed: The Curse of CAR: Warlords, Blood Diamonds, and Dead Elephants

Enough Project Non-Resident Senior Fellow Christopher Day explores how in ending the hideous civil war in the Central African Republic, sanctions against leaders may help, but it is also imperative to stop the illicit trade in gems and ivory that is funding the warlords.  Read More »

Behind the Headlines: Drivers of Violence in the Central African Republic

The Enough Project has been closely following the violent conflict in Central African Republic, where mass killings and human rights abuses continue at an alarming rate. This new report authored by Field Researcher Kasper Agger explores the underlying drivers of the conflict, including regional dynamics and natural resource exploitation. Additionally it identifies ways the international community can support sustainable peace and stability.

Behind the Headlines: Drivers of Violence in the Central African Republic
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