Genocide

New Report: Janjaweed Reincarnate

UNAMID

A new Enough Project report traces the movement and atrocities of Sudan's Rapid Support Forces (RSF), a new iteration of the Janjaweed militias. The RSF are an upgraded version of the Janjaweed that the world came to fear in Darfur ten years ago, but are better equipped, centrally commanded, and fully integrated into the Sudanese government’s security structures.  Read More »

VICE News Op-ed: Sudan's Silent Suffering Is Getting Worse

Sudan may be the world’s most murderous conflict. But the suffering of its people has been obscured, redacted, made silent. It is almost unfathomable that things could get worse, yet today the scale of violence is rising to unprecedented levels. The situation may sound hopeless - but that is not the case, as George Clooney and John Prendergast explain.
   Read More »

Omer Ismail Speaks at Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission Briefing on Sudan

Omer Ismail presents at a Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission briefing in the U.S

On May 20, Enough Project Senior Advisor Omer Ismail presented at a Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission briefing in the U.S. House of Representatives. The briefing, which included former U.S. Special Envoy for Sudan and South Sudan Princeton Lyman and citizen journalist Ryan Boyette, focused on the ongoing human rights violations and the escalation of violence throughout Sudan.  Read More »

STATEMENT: Enough Project on Peace Deal Reached between South Sudan President Kiir and Rebel Leader Riek Machar

Date: 
May 9, 2014
For Immediate Release: 9 May 2014
Contact: Alec Saslow, 720 319 4948alec@fitzgibbonmedia.com 
 
STATEMENT: Enough Project on Peace Deal Reached between South Sudan President Kiir and Rebel Leader Riek Machar
 
Today, South Sudan’s President Salva Kiir and rebel leader Riek Machar have agreed to a peace deal after a five-month conflict.
 
Said Enough Project Co-Founder John Prendergast:
 
"This deal is in part the fruit of Secretary Kerry's personal diplomacy during his trip the previous week.  It is a crucial first step towards ending the horrors being perpetrated against civilians on the battleground that has become South Sudan.  We will know very quickly whether the parties are serious, as they are right now poised to attack each other in a number of volatile locations on the front lines of the war.  It is crucial to deploy the regional civilian protection force and ceasefire monitors to ensure some measure of compliance. If this falls apart, the fighting will enter an even bloodier phase as the stakes continue to increase.”
 
Sudan and South Sudan Policy Analyst Akshaya Kumar added:

"This agreement comes at a critical moment for South Sudan, where disturbing bouts of violence along ethnic lines have raised the specter of genocide. Still, while necessary, this agreement is not sufficient for a lasting and durable peace. For that, much more inclusive negotiations and reconciliation including a wider range of stakeholders will be necessary, otherwise it's hard to see how this deal will make a difference on the ground.”

To speak with an Enough Project spokesperson, please contact Alec Saslow (720.319.4948Alec@Fitzgibbonmedia.com) or Christina DiPasquale  (202.716.1953christina@fitzgibbonmedia.com).

# # #

The Enough Project is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on the crises in Sudan, South Sudan, eastern Congo, and areas affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough conducts intensive field research, develops practical policies to address these crises, and shares sensible tools to empower citizens and groups working for change. To learn more about Enough, go to www.enoughproject.org.

STATEMENT: U.S. Needs to Build on Secretary Kerry's Initiatives in South Sudan to Prevent Genocide and Famine

Date: 
May 2, 2014

For Immediate Release: 2 May 2014
Contact: Christina DiPasquale, 202.716.1953Christina@fitzgibbonmedia.com

STATEMENT: U.S. Needs to Build on Secretary Kerry's Initiatives in South Sudan to Prevent Genocide and Famine

Today, as Secretary Kerry visits Juba in his effort to prioritize civilian protection throughout South Sudan, The Enough Project released the following statement from Co-Founder John Prendergast, former Director for African Affairs at the National Security Council:

“Two words that never should be used lightly are beginning to be heard with alarming frequency in South Sudan today: genocide and famine.  The danger of both is clear and present, and state collapse threatens.  Targeting people on the basis of their identity and obstructing humanitarian access puts hundreds of thousands of lives at immediate risk.

"Full support should be given to deploying troops from neighboring states to protect civilians who are most vulnerable to being attacked, raped or killed on the basis of their ethnicity.   

"At the same time, meaningful consequences must be deployed for the commission of war crimes.  The U.S. should work closely with neighboring states and the African Union to freeze the assets of those South Sudanese rebel or government officials found to be orchestrating human rights crimes.  These officials own fixed assets and have accounts in Kenya, Uganda, Ethiopia, South Africa and Dubai, but a great deal of diplomatic effort will need to convince those governments to act. 

"Furthermore, the creation of a mixed special court -- partly international, partly South Sudanese -- would enhance the potential for justice and accountability for those that have orchestrated some of the worst crimes.  If the idea emerges, it should be fully supported by Secretary Kerry."

See also:

To speak to an Enough Project spokesperson, please contact Christina DiPasquale at 202.716.1953 or Christina@fitzgibbonmedia.com.

###

The Enough Project is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on the crises in Sudan, South Sudan, eastern Congo, and areas affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough conducts intensive field research, develops practical policies to address these crises, and shares sensible tools to empower citizens and groups working for change. To learn more about Enough, go to www.enoughproject.org.

Behind the Headlines: Drivers of Violence in the Central African Republic

The Enough Project has been closely following the violent conflict in Central African Republic, where mass killings and human rights abuses continue at an alarming rate. This new report authored by Field Researcher Kasper Agger explores the underlying drivers of the conflict, including regional dynamics and natural resource exploitation. Additionally it identifies ways the international community can support sustainable peace and stability.

Behind the Headlines: Drivers of Violence in the Central African Republic

Daily Beast Op-Ed: Preventing Genocide in South Sudan

Twenty years after Rwanda’s genocide, the world’s newest state—not Syria or Darfur—is the region most in danger of mass exterminations along ethnic lines.  Read More »

Op-ed: Darfur, The Genocide America Forgot

Earlier this month, Sudan’s paramilitary Janjaweed forces razed 127 empty villages in Darfur to the ground. According to reports in local media, this was their second rampage over the same territory in as many months.   Read More »

Rwanda20 Commemorated by Congress

Marking the 20th anniversary of the Rwandan Genocide, U.S. Senators Robert Menendez (D-N.J.), Chris Coons (D-Del.), and Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) introduced Senate Resolution 413 on April 7. S. Res. 413 commemorates and honors the lives of those affected, and expresses support for the people of Rwanda on this day. The resolution condemns ongoing atrocities perpetrated against civilians in Syria, the Central African Republic, South Sudan, Sudan, and elsewhere, while strengthening the U.S. commitment to prevent future acts of genocide and mass atrocities.  Read More »

Still a Problem From Hell, Two Decades After Rwanda

Rwandan Genocide Remembrance

Twenty years after Rwanda’s horrors, there are signs of hope for a more effective international response to future genocides—but only if we recognize the evolution in genocidal tactics. This op-ed by John Prendergast originally appeared in The Daily Beast on the 20th anniversary of the Rwandan Genocide.  Read More »

Syndicate content