Human Rights

New Report: Starvation Warfare in South Kordofan’s Nuba Mountains

As the humanitarian crisis unfolds in Sudan’s South Kordofan and Blue Nile states, international humanitarian organizations have not been able to assess the nutrition and food security situation in these areas… until now. For the first time since 2011—when the government of Sudan banned all international humanitarian aid organizations from operating in the two states—an independent rapid food security and nutrition assessment has been conducted in South Kordofan state.  Read More »

New Evidence of Links from Rwanda and Uganda to Congo Rebels: What’s the Impact?

A recent confidential from the U.N. Group of Experts on Congo was leaked to Reuters yesterday that shows further evidence of Rwandan support to the M23 rebellion in eastern Congo. The report builds on earlier indictments of Rwanda's involvement in the ongoing rebellion and implicates the Ugandan government as well. What impact could this new evidence have on regional and international handling of the crisis?  Read More »

In the News: 'Now, we have evidence that demands attention and accountability'

Major news outlets all over the world helped spread the word of ongoing atrocities in Sudan yesterday through their coverage of the Satellite Sentinel Project’s, or SSP’s, most recent report “Cameras on the Battlefield: Multimedia Confirmation of the Razing of Gardud al Badry, South Kordofan, Sudan” and corresponding video, “Village Burning, Torture in the Nuba Mountains: Naim's Story.”  Read More »

Conflict-free Portland Makes Inroads with Intel

Activists in Portland, Oregon, are gaining traction with several initiatives focused on making the city investments free from conflict minerals from Congo. In this guest post by Alysha Atma, Amanda Ulrich, and Robert Hadley, the Oregon Coalition for Humanity members describe their recent successes.  Read More »

Converting Rhetoric Into Reality on Atrocity Prevention

In April 2012, President Obama went all-in rhetorically when he asserted that preventing mass atrocities and genocide is a "core national security interest and a core moral responsibility of the United States." Such statements are in part an outgrowth of the American public's horror at the genocide and atrocities of recent decades in places like Bosnia, Rwanda, and Darfur. But as the limited U.S. response to the ongoing conflict in Syria illustrates, there is not yet a full understanding of the centrality of preventing mass atrocities to our national security.  Read More »

Take Action: Ask the Debate Moderators to Ask about Sudan

The Enough Project and our partner organizations want to hear more about President Obama and former Governor Romney's views on Africa’s major conflicts. Here are a few ways to push them to address these issues in the debates.  Read More »

Publicizing LRA Leader Kony's Whereabouts Could Undermine Apprehension Efforts

Date: 
Oct 12, 2012

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Tracy Fehr, tfehr@enoughproject.org,+1 202-459-1219

Publicizing LRA Leader Kony's Whereabouts Could Undermine Apprehension Efforts

WASHINGTON and KAMPALA, Uganda -- The Enough Project questions why the Ugandan army released sensitive information yesterday about the location of Joseph Kony, the leader of the Lord's Resistance Army, or LRA. Releasing information about Kony’s whereabouts could jeopardize the success of military operations aimed at apprehending him and his senior commanders.

"By publicizing where Kony is, the Ugandan army runs the risk of undermining the success of the mission to capture him and bring him to justice," said Ashley Benner, Enough Project LRA Policy Analyst. "The Ugandan government perhaps feels under pressure to show that it both knows where Kony and his senior commanders are and is actively engaged in pursuing them. However, maintaining the integrity of the operations to capture the LRA's senior leaders should be of utmost concern to the Ugandan government and the U.S. government, which deployed military advisors to advise and assist the governments in the region in ending the LRA conflict."

The Enough Project is also concerned that the Ugandan army is not deployed in all areas where the LRA operates, including in the northeastern part of the Central African Republic, where the Ugandan army stated that Kony is present. In order to apprehend Kony and other LRA commanders wanted by the International Criminal Court, the Ugandan army must be allowed access and urged to deploy into areas where the LRA is reportedly operating. If the Ugandans are not able or willing to deploy where Kony and his deputies are present, then the U.S. military advisors should be given the ability to take a more direct role in pursuing the Kony and other LRA leaders.

"Today the Ugandan army stated that they believe Kony is living in Vakaga Prefecture in the Central African Republic,” said Kasper Agger, Enough Project LRA Field Researcher based in Kampala. “This is an area where the Ugandans do not have any soldiers at the moment. In case they do know where Kony is, one would wish that they would actually go after him rather than leaking sensitive intelligence. This appears to be a premature statement from the Ugandans and the fact remains that Kony could easily have moved out of that area already."

#

Enough is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, the Enough Project focuses on crises in Sudan, eastern Congo, and areas of Africa affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough’s strategy papers and briefings provide sharp field analysis and targeted policy recommendations based on a“3P” crisis response strategy: promoting durable peace, providing civilian protection, and punishing perpetrators of atrocities. Enough works with concerned citizens, advocates, and policy makers to prevent, mitigate, and resolve these crises. For more information, please visit www.enoughproject.org.

Forgotten Again: How the World Has Failed Abyei

Sudan and South Sudan made monumental progress in recent weeks with the conclusion of a set of agreements on September 27 concerning oil, borders, and security. Of the outstanding issues still unresolved between the two countries, the disputed Abyei region remains a flashpoint that must be settled if Sudan and South Sudan are to achieve lasting peace.  Read More »

Envisioning a New Sudan

As dissent to Sudan’s ruling National Congress Party, or NCP, grows, the elusive question of what an alternative government would look like has spurred visionary documents from Sudan’s opposition groups. On October 4, members of the armed opposition the Sudan Revolutionary Front, or SRF, met in Kampala and signed a 20-page document entitled “The Restructuring of the Sudanese State,” which offers an alternative blueprint to President Bashir’s authoritarian regime.  Read More »

Peace in the Sudans Hinges on the Final Status of Abyei: Enough Brief

Date: 
Oct 11, 2012

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Tracy Fehr, tfehr@enoughproject.org, +1 202-459-1219

WASHINGTON – The success of the recent agreement between Sudan and South Sudan ultimately hinges on the resolution of the remaining outstanding issues, chief among them is the final status of the disputed Abyei area, argues a new Enough Project brief.

Abyei, which is the traditional homeland of the nine Ngok Dinka chiefdoms, straddles the ill-defined international border separating the two Sudans. For decades, the international community has lacked the political will to safeguard the rights of Abyei citizens and to ensure that Khartoum implements the agreements it has signed concerning the area’s status.

However, according to the brief, the A.U. Peace and Security briefing later this month offers an opportunity for the international community to adopt and implement a final agreement on this outstanding issue.

“Despite Abyei’s central role as a catalyst for North-South tensions, the international community has historically dodged the difficult issue of the area’s final status,” said John Prendergast, co-author of the report and Enough Project Co-founder. “Determining the final status of Abyei and resolving the other outstanding issues is imperative for any sort of sustainable peace between the two countries, as well as for the successful implementation of the September 27 agreements between Sudan and South Sudan.”

The brief recommends that when President Thabo Mbeki briefs the A.U. Peace and Security Council on the agreements between the Sudans, he should present the African Union High-Level Implementation Panel’s proposals on the remaining outstanding issues, including the status of Abyei. Further, Mbeki should propose unfettered international humanitarian access into Blue Nile and South Kordofan, as well as support for a North-North negotiation process, and call on the U.N. Security Council to enforce such efforts.

"President Mbeki's upcoming report to the African Union provides him with a unique opportunity to set the tone for the international community's response to the remaining outstanding issues, among them the final status of Abyei," said Jennifer Christian, co-author of the report and Enough Project Sudan Policy Analyst. "President Mbeki should present the AUHIP's proposal on Abyei in its entirety and request that both the AU and the UN ratify the proposal as the final resolution to the two Sudans' dispute over the area. If history teaches us anything, it’s that a failure on the part of the international community to take a strong stance on Abyei now will very likely result in further violence on the ground in the near future."

Read the Full Report: “Forgotten Again: How the World Has Failed Abyei

#

Enough is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, the Enough Project focuses on crises in Sudan, eastern Congo, and areas of Africa affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough’s strategy papers and briefings provide sharp field analysis and targeted policy recommendations based on a“3P” crisis response strategy: promoting durable peace, providing civilian protection, and punishing perpetrators of atrocities. Enough works with concerned citizens, advocates, and policy makers to prevent, mitigate, and resolve these crises. For more information, please visit www.enoughproject.org.

Syndicate content