Justice and Accountability

Jewelry Leaders and CEOs Join Enough Project in Conflict Gold Solutions Forum

On July 27, 2014, The Enough Project participated in roundtable discussion at the Jewelers of America (JA) New York Show, co-hosted by JA and the National Retail Federation (NRF), to discuss the need for responsible gold sourcing from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Currently, the illegal mining and trade of minerals, particularly gold, fuel terrible violence and suffering for the Congolese people. The discussion centered on industry experiences and practical tools to build on current corporate initiatives for responsible sourcing and development in Congo and the Great Lakes Region. 

 

A Doctor's View from a Foxhole in Sudan

The aftermath of the bombing, Photo by author

I'm a doctor, not a writer. But the situation I witnessed while volunteering in the Nuba Mountains of Sudan compels me to write and tell the story of what is happening there. Since 2011, the only hospital in the entire Nuba Mountains region, Mother of Mercy in Gidel, had been spared bombardment – until last month.   Read More »

Daily Beast Op-Ed: Obama's Africa Summit and the New Danger in Congo

weapons_DRC_UN_Congo
The U.S. and the U.N. have an opportunity to prevent further bloodshed in Central Africa, if they’re prepared to take certain steps to do so.
 

 
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As Mariam Walks Free, Omer Ismail Highlights Broader Injustices Perpetrated by Sudan Government

On July 24, after a lengthy ordeal, Mariam Ibrahim was released into the custody of Italy’s deputy foreign minister. Ms. Ibrahim was sentenced to death by hanging by a Sudanese court on charges of apostasy – converting from Islam to Christianity – and this verdict roused global condemnation. The case serves as a stark example of the violence that continues to be perpetrated by the government of Sudan against millions of Sudanese citizens.  Read More »

New UN Envoy to Great Lakes Region is Very Promising

UN Photo/Evan Schneider

On July 17th, United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon announced the appointment of senior Algerian diplomat Ambassador Said Djinnit as Special Envoy to the Great Lakes Region of Africa. With international attention on Congo at a peak, Amb. Djinnit, in cooperation with his colleagues working in the Great Lakes region, African political leaders, and civil society groups, must harness this opportunity and lay the groundwork for a sustainable peace to take root.  Read More »

Minding the Gap: London hosts unprecedented global summit to end sexual violence in conflict

In an effort to prevent tragedies like the November 22, 2012 attack on Minova and the impunity that followed, actress and UN Special Envoy Angelina Jolie and British Foreign Secretary William Hague co-chaired the first ever Global Summit to End Sexual Violence in Conflict in London on June 10-13. The summit highlighted what can and must be done to address this widespread issue.  Read More »

The Chebeya Case: Persistence in the Pursuit of Justice

On June 2, the family of murdered Congolese human rights activist Floribert Chebeya filed a lawsuit in Senegal accusing a Congolese police officer of participation in the 2010 killing of Chebeya and his driver, Fidele Bazana. The new charges, filed on behalf of the victims’ relatives, are a welcomed development in an otherwise troubling series of events following Chebeya’s death. Congolese authorities should properly investigate and prosecute these crimes and ensure the families and supporters of the case are protected from intimidation and attack.  Read More »

VICE News Op-ed: Sudan's Silent Suffering Is Getting Worse

Sudan may be the world’s most murderous conflict. But the suffering of its people has been obscured, redacted, made silent. It is almost unfathomable that things could get worse, yet today the scale of violence is rising to unprecedented levels. The situation may sound hopeless - but that is not the case, as George Clooney and John Prendergast explain.
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Daily Beast Op-ed: The Curse of CAR: Warlords, Blood Diamonds, and Dead Elephants

Enough Project Non-Resident Senior Fellow Christopher Day explores how in ending the hideous civil war in the Central African Republic, sanctions against leaders may help, but it is also imperative to stop the illicit trade in gems and ivory that is funding the warlords.  Read More »

STATEMENT: Enough Project on Sanctions Against Individuals in Central African Republic

Date: 
May 14, 2014
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: May 14, 2014

CONTACT: 

Alec Saslow: Alec@FitzGibbonmedia.com720.319.4948

Christina DiPasquale: Christina@FitzGibbonmedia.com202.716.1953

STATEMENT: Enough Project on Sanctions Against Individuals in 
Central African Republic

Following the announcement that President Obama is authorizing the imposition of sanctions against five individuals for fueling violence in the Central African Republic, Kasper Agger, field researcher at the Enough Project, issued the following statement.

“The announcement from the President is an important step forward to hold those most responsible for the continuing violence accountable and work towards a peace process. But authorizing sanctions is only part of a multi-pronged solution and disarmament strategy that should target all armed groups. A comprehensive approach to stem the violence across the country should also focus on the political peace and reconciliation process, combined with support for the transitional government and the justice system to end impunity.” 

Earlier this month, the Enough Project released Behind the Headlines: Drivers of Violence in the Central African Republic,” which provided a comprehensive analysis of the conflict and outlined the role of the illicit trade of diamonds and elephant ivory, and offered recommendations to stem the violence. 

To speak with an Enough Project spokesperson about the violence in the Central African Republic and the sanctions issued by President Obama, please contact Alec Saslow (720.319.4948Alec@Fitzgibbonmedia.com) or Christina DiPasquale  (202.716.1953christina@fitzgibbonmedia.com)

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The Enough Project is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on the crises in Sudan, South Sudan, eastern Congo, and areas affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough conducts intensive field research, develops practical policies to address these crises, and shares sensible tools to empower citizens and groups working for change. To learn more about Enough, go to www.enoughproject.org.

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