Justice and Accountability

Behind the Headlines: Drivers of Violence in the Central African Republic

The Enough Project has been closely following the violent conflict in Central African Republic, where mass killings and human rights abuses continue at an alarming rate. This new report authored by Field Researcher Kasper Agger explores the underlying drivers of the conflict, including regional dynamics and natural resource exploitation. Additionally it identifies ways the international community can support sustainable peace and stability.

Behind the Headlines: Drivers of Violence in the Central African Republic

Minnesota Lawyers Support Conflict-Free Initiative

On April 25, 2014, the Minnesota State Bar Association (“MSBA”) became the first Bar Association in the nation to adopt a conflict-free policy.  Read More »

Daily Beast Op-Ed: Preventing Genocide in South Sudan

Twenty years after Rwanda’s genocide, the world’s newest state—not Syria or Darfur—is the region most in danger of mass exterminations along ethnic lines.  Read More »

Statement by the Enough Project and Coalition Partners on the Violence in South Sudan

The Enough Project and coalition partners released an urgent statement in response to vicious attacks against civilians in South Sudan, including the recent attacks in Bentiu and Bor. The conflict threatens to destabilize the entire region and requires the immediate attention of the international community to stop the killing. This statement calls on both sides of the conflict and the international community to work towards engaging in peace and providing humanitarian assistance.  Read More »

Questions Remain in The Death of Rebel Leader Morgan

Paul Sadala, aka. Morgan, leader of the Congolese militia Mai Mai Morgan

Paul Sadala, aka. Morgan, leader of the Congolese militia Mai Mai Morgan, was killed last week on April 14, two days after he surrendered with 42 members of his militia. It is still unclear why Morgan, who was alleged to engage in sexual violence, gold pillaging, and ivory poaching, surrendered in the first place. Here we provide an in depth look into his death.  Read More »

Daily Beast Op-ed: Before There’s a Genocide: The Slaughter in South Sudan Must Stop

Hate radio; butchered men, women and children; ethnic revenge—the tragedy of South Sudan’s civil war grows worse by the day. This new op-ed by the Enough Project's John Prendergast and Justine Fleischner provides solutions and calls for more international action to bring this violence to an end.

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Enough and Human Rights Watch call for accountability For Congo Park Warden shooting

Director of Virunga National Park, Mr. Emmanuel De Merode

On Tuesday, April 15, the director of Virunga National Park, Africa's oldest national park, was shot by unknown gunmen in North Kivu. Both the Human Rights Watch and Enough Project have made statements condemning the attack and calling for justice.  Read More »

New Targeted Sanctions for South Sudan Lack Clout

South Sudanese President Salva Kiirand former Vice-President Riek Machar (AP)

A week after President Obama announced potential targeted sanctions against individuals responsible for the ongoing violence in South Sudan both sides have expressed an overwhelming lack of concern that they will be affected.   Read More »

Still a Problem From Hell, Two Decades After Rwanda

Rwandan Genocide Remembrance

Twenty years after Rwanda’s horrors, there are signs of hope for a more effective international response to future genocides—but only if we recognize the evolution in genocidal tactics. This op-ed by John Prendergast originally appeared in The Daily Beast on the 20th anniversary of the Rwandan Genocide.  Read More »

New Report: Sudan's Tortured Peace Process

Women wait for food rations from WFP in Kaasab camp, Darfur, Sudan. (AP)

As the African Union prepares to reconvene talks between the Sudanese Government and Rebel Leaders, the stakes for peace and for civilians affected by the conflict are higher than ever. February 2014 was the deadliest month for civilians in South Kordofan due to aerial bombardment since 2011.   Read More »

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