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New Report: Expectations for Companies' Conflict Minerals Reporting

Today, the Enough Project along with the Responsible Sourcing Network released a report,"Expectations for Companies' Conflict Minerals Reporting", that articulates key reporting components that are important to socially responsible investors and rights groups who have been advocates for a clean minerals trade.  Read More »

Expectations for Companies' Conflict Minerals Reporting

As companies prepare their first required reports on conflict mineral use to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, SEC, Responsible Sourcing Network and the Enough Project released a report that sets expectations for the contents of the inaugural reports required by Section 1502 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act.

Investors and Human Rights Advocates Set Expectations for SEC Dodd-Frank Conflict Minerals Reports

Date: 
Sep 5, 2013

Enough Project and Responsible Sourcing Network Press Release 

Embargoed Until: 12:01 a.m. ET, Thursday, September 5, 2013                     

Contacts: Carine Umuhumuza, cumuhumuza@enoughproject.org, 202-478-5314

  Katherine Kassing,katherine@asyousow.org,510-735-8144 

Investors and Human Rights Advocates Set Expectations for SEC Dodd-Frank Conflict Minerals Reports

As companies prepare their first required reports on conflict mineral use to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, SEC, key investors and human rights groups, have released a paper that sets expectations for the contents of the inaugural reports required by Section 1502 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act.

"Expectations for Companies’ Conflict Minerals Reporting" describes the content that sustainable and responsible investors and human rights advocates expect to see in a company’s Specialized Disclosure Form and/or Conflict Minerals Report. These disclosures will include information on the use of minerals sourced from the Democratic Republic of the Congo or neighboring countries, where egregious human rights abuses linked to the mining industry have plagued the region for 15 years. 

Patricia Jurewicz, Director of Responsible Sourcing Network and co-author of the paper, states:

“Investors would like to see their companies establish baselines the first year and specify the steps they are taking so we can then measure improvements in transparency and accountability reporting over time. Our paper provides a set of specific indicators that can be tracked to allow for comparability between annual reports.”

Both Responsible Sourcing Network and the Enough Project, authoring organizations of the paper, engaged with the SEC throughout the process of defining the reporting requirements for section 1502, which began in 2010. 
 
Darren Fenwick, Senior Government Affairs Manager at the Enough Project and co-author of the paper states:

“Advocates for a clean minerals trade wish to understand how issuers, who are connected to the Congo through mineral sourcing, are addressing their connection to the conflict that has resulted in millions of deaths. Additionally, companies whose reports show compliance benefit from positive public sentiment and increased brand recognition.” 

The paper details the expectations for companies’ successful reporting, including:

  • Constructing key elements of a vigorous company conflict minerals policy and steps for implementing a program
  • ​Metrics that companies should track to effectively determine their actions to accurately assess the origin of their minerals
  • Commitment to only using minerals from smelters that have been audited as conflict-free by a credible program such as the Conflict-Free Sourcing Initiative as they become available; and
  • Building a clean minerals trade by 1) Committing to sourcing conflict-free minerals from Congo and the surrounding region; and 2) Implementing OECD due diligence processes to determine if an issuers’ minerals are contributing to the conflict. 

Stakeholders also encourage companies to take compliance beyond the 1502 reporting requirements to help create a peaceful and secure Congo by participating in diplomatic efforts and contributing to alternative livelihood projects in the region. 

Read the paper, "Expectations for Companies' Conflict Minerals Reporting": http://www.enoughproject.org/files/Expectations-for-Companies-Conflict-Minerals-Reporting.pdf

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Responsible Sourcing Network (www.sourcingnetwork.org), a project of the nonprofit organization As You Sow (www.asyousow.org), is dedicated to ending human rights abuses and forced labor associated with the raw materials found in products we use every day. RSN builds responsible supply chain coalitions of diverse stakeholders to leverage their influence in the areas of conflict minerals from the Congo and forced labor in the cotton fields of Uzbekistan. 

Enough Project (www.enoughproject.org) is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on the crises in Sudan, South Sudan, eastern Congo, and areas affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough conducts intensive field research, develops practical policies to address these crises, and shares sensible tools to empower citizens and groups working for change. 

Enough Project Applauds President's Appointment of Booth as Special Envoy to Sudan and South Sudan

Date: 
Aug 28, 2013

Enough Project Media Advisory

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Carine Umuhumuza, cumuhumuza@enoughproject.org, 202-478-5314

Enough Project Applauds President’s Appointment of Booth as Special Envoy to the Sudans

WASHINGTON -- Today, President Obama announced Ambassador Donald E. Booth as the new U.S. special envoy to Sudan and South Sudan.

The Enough Project welcomes the appointment of Ambassador Booth as U.S. special envoy and looks forward to working with him to address the ongoing crises in and between Sudan and South Sudan.  

Enough Project Co-Founder John Prendergast states:

“The challenges facing Ambassador Booth are enormous. U.S. policy as presently articulated is inadequate to those challenges. Without policy change, Booth has little chance of fulfilling the objective of the position. The U.S. must work aggressively to develop a new approach to war-torn Sudan, in particular helping to create an African-led peace process that addresses all of Sudan’s conflicts, rather than dealing with them one by one, as the present, failed model does. He should also work to focus U.S. policy on democratic transformations in both Sudan and South Sudan. The entrenched dictatorship in Khartoum and the lack of democratic institutions in Juba are fundamental drivers for present and future conflict. The U.S. can play a pivotal role in both countries if it prioritizes the building of leverage in support of comprehensive peace in the region.”

Enough Project Executive Director John C. Bradshaw states:

“The appointment of a seasoned diplomat like Don Booth to this critical position will enhance U.S efforts to promote peace within Sudan and between Sudan and South Sudan.  We urge Special Envoy Booth to push for a comprehensive, internationally-backed peace process in Sudan which does not segment the conflicts across border regions—Darfur, Abyei, South Kordofan, and Blue Nile State—but addresses them holistically, and includes greater engagement with opposition groups working toward democratic transformation in Sudan.”

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The Enough Project is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on the crises in Sudan, South Sudan, eastern Congo, and areas affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough conducts intensive field research, develops practical policies to address these crises, and shares sensible tools to empower citizens and groups working for change. To learn more about Enough, go to www.enoughproject.org.

 

The Recent Fighting in Eastern Congo and Its Implications for Peace

On Sunday, July 14, 2013, fighting between the Congolese army and the M23 rebel group resumed on the outskirts of Goma in eastern Congo, with each side blaming the other for initiating the hostilities. This field dispatch explores the recent fighting and lays out the implications for peace in the region. 

Activist Brief: Nine Things You Need to Know About the Conflict in Darfur

The latest round of violence in Darfur – torching of villages, terrorizing civilians, and systematically clearing prime land and resource-rich areas of their inhabitants – has forced the largest population movement since the height of the genocide in the mid-2000s. This activist brief outlines important facts about the escalating violence and highlights action for U.S. citizens to take in order to advocate for an end to the ongoing conflict in Darfur.

D.C. District Court Upholds Dodd-Frank Conflict Minerals Rule

SEC Chair Mary Jo White

On July 23, the U.S. District Court in Washington, DC rejected the lawsuit on conflict minerals legislation, section 1502 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform Act.   Read More »

Resolve: Loosening Kony’s Grip and Effective Strategies for Today's LRA

“The LRA is likely weaker than it has been in at least 20 years” explains our partner organization The Resolve: LRA Crisis Initiative.   Read More »

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