Multimedia

  • A panel conversation co-sponsored by the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy and the Harvard University Committee on African Studies. Featuring Enough Project Advisor Omer Ismail.

  • In 2003, brutal attacks on Darfur's civilian population captured the world's attention, but attention has drifted away from the war-torn region, since violence in Darfur diminished in the mid 2000s. Still, the root causes of the conflict persist. This mini-documentary done in coordination with our partners at iAct features the Enough Project's John Prendergast and Omer Ismail speaking with displaced Darfuris and hearing their stories.

  • Uganda's military has welcomed a move by the United States to offer additional support to help in tracking wanted warlord Joseph Kony. The U.S is sending 150 Air Force Special Operations personnel and at least four advanced Osprey aircraft.

  • Enough Project Co-Founder, John Prendergast speaks with BBC World News America anchor Katty Kay on his latest visit to war-torn South Sudan.

  • Escalating violence, displacement, and new political developments in the areas along Sudan’s periphery—Darfur, South Kordofan, and Blue Nile—are going largely unnoticed as international attention focuses on violence in South Sudan. These two infographics display the negative humanitarian impact of the continued violence and displacement in Darfur, South Kordofan, and Blue Nile.

  • On Tuesday, January 7, 2014, Intel CEO Brian Krzanich announced that its entire 2014 line of microprocessors would be conflict-free making them the first in the rare mineral-heavy industry to completely phase out conflict minerals in one of their products.

  • U.N. Special Envoy Mary Robinson told the New York Times that she always listens to taxi drivers. The Enough Project took to the streets of Goma in eastern Congo and asked motorcycle taxi drivers, activists, and civilians for their message to her about the peace process. The success of the peace process depends on the inclusion of Congolese civil society voices such as those represented in this video.

  • This interactive timeline, which includes embedded videos, reports, and primary source materials, traces key events in the area from the 2004 Abyei Protocol to the present day.

  • The two most powerful armed actors in eastern Congo at present - Congo's national army and M23 rebels - collaborate with networks of armed groups. The networks, with varying degrees of interaction, enable them to control territory, including mines, allow alleged war criminals to hide, and or face a common enemy. Other groups are unaligned to either the army or M23. 

  • The Enough Project investigates the Lord's Resistance Army's role in ivory poaching in Garamba National Park.