Press Releases

  • Sep 8, 2011

    Against a backdrop of Sudan’s ongoing attacks against civilians in Darfur, its alleged war crimes spree in the oil-producing border regions of Abyei and South Kordofan, and most recently its indiscriminate bombing of civilians in Blue Nile State, it might sound counterintuitive to proclaim this as an unprecedented moment of opportunity for Sudan. But Enough Project Co-founder John Prendergast makes precisely that case in the latest policy essay from the Enough Project, “What the Arab Spring Means for Sudan.”

  • Sep 2, 2011

    The Enough Project condemns the Government of Sudan for attacking the border state of Blue Nile.

  • Aug 25, 2011

    The Enough Project condemned the Government of Sudan for breaking its own ceasefire in the troubled Nuba Mountain region of South Kordofan State.

  • Aug 24, 2011

    The Satellite Sentinel Project (SSP) has confirmed the burial of human remains, some of them in body bags or tarps, through a series of DigitalGlobe satellite images taken of two newly discovered mass grave sites in Sudan’s restive South Kordofan region. The addition of the two new mass graves brings the total discovered by SSP to eight.

  • Aug 17, 2011

    The Satellite Sentinel Project (SSP) has obtained visual evidence, and new eyewitness reports, of three more mass grave sites in and around Kadugli, capital of Sudan’s conflict-torn Southern Kordofan state. Satellite imagery reveals what appear to be two piles of corpses wrapped in body bags or tarps on a wooded mountainside. Rising above the site are the town’s landmark, giant words of welcome: “Kadugli, The Town of Love and Peace.” The painted, white Arabic lettering is visible by anyone who flies in or drives through.

  • Aug 4, 2011

    The partition of Sudan creates a major opportunity for a re-set in U.S. policy toward both Sudan and South Sudan, the Enough Project said in a new paper. The urgent human rights crisis in the Nuba Mountains, the continuing emergency in Darfur, the successful secession of the South, and the political reforms sweeping across North Africa and the Middle East provide unprecedented entry points for the U.S. and other interested parties to finally address the root causes of Sudan's cyclical conflicts.

  • Aug 4, 2011

    The Enough Project welcomes the steps taken by President Obama to prevent mass atrocities and impose consequences on human rights violators, and looks forward to working with the Obama administration as it undertakes a comprehensive review to strengthen the United States’ ability to prevent mass atrocities.

  • Aug 4, 2011

    Bishop Andudu Adam Elnail, the Anglican Bishop of Kadugli in Sudan’s South Kordofan, testified before the U.S. House of Representatives subcommittee on Africa on Thursday, August 4, 2011. C-SPAN broadcast the proceedings live.

  • Aug 3, 2011

    Bishop Andudu Adam Elnail, the Anglican Bishop of Kadugli in Sudan’s South Kordofan, will testify before the U.S. House of Representatives subcommittee on Africa on Thursday, August 4 at 10 a.m. in the Rayburn Office Building room 2172.

  • Jul 28, 2011

    Celebrities are becoming a significant contributing factor to human rights advocacy in Africa.

    "Celebrities who use their fame to highlight the plight of some of the world's most vulnerable people are making a real difference. They have educated countless people and shined a light on issues that would otherwise remain shrouded in darkness. By recruiting thousands of people to relatively unknown causes, they help create a real pressure for change,” said Co-founder of the Enough Project John Prendergast, who works closely with many of the organization’s celebrity partners.

    To highlight celebrities who have partnered to date with the Enough Project on various campaigns and initiatives, the Enough Project has launched an online Celebrity Upstanders database. This new web resource includes 44 celebrity profiles that feature video clips, press interviews, and opinion pieces, highlighting each individual celebrity’s involvement with the Enough Project, and its conflict areas in the Sudan, DR Congo, and LRA-affected communities.

  • Jul 14, 2011

    The Satellite Sentinel Project (SSP) has revealed visual evidence of mass graves in South Kordofan, which corroborates new eyewitness reports, obtained by SSP, of systematic killings and mass burials in this conflict-torn region of Sudan. The evidence found by SSP is consistent with allegations that the Sudan Armed Forces (SAF) and northern militias have engaged in a campaign of killing civilians.

  • Jul 13, 2011

    While the Republic of South Sudan celebrates independence as the world’s newest nation, the rest of Sudan remains a chronically unstable state which requires a new international strategy to avert further bloodshed, according to the latest report from the Enough Project, “Rethinking Sudan After Southern Secession.”

  • Jul 7, 2011

    As South Sudan’s Independence Day on July 9th approaches, the international community is focusing on the birth of its newest nation. Media outlets from around the world are covering this historical event. As a tool for journalists who do not have extensive background knowledge on the subject, the Enough Project has created this brief contextual overview on South Sudan and its related issues.

  • Jul 6, 2011

    On July 9, the historic day that South Sudan becomes an independent nation separate from the rest of Sudan, Youth United for Darfur -- the Chicagoland coalition of high schools and colleges working together for peace and education for the people of Darfur -- will hold  its inaugural Walk with Darfur. The walk will take place on Saturday afternoon in downtown Chicago, in conjunction with the Sudanese Community Association of Illinois’ celebration of the independence of South Sudan.

  • Jul 6, 2011

    The Satellite Sentinel Project has identified an apparent convoy of Sudan Armed Forces vehicles and towed artillery, stretching over two kilometers and consistent with an infantry unit of at least regiment size -- equal to approximately 1,000 troops -- in Kadugli, capital of Sudan's conflict-ridden border region of South Kordofan. The apparent convoy is pointed north, although its origin, destination and total length remain unknown.