Darfur and southern Sudan Publications

  • Aug 26, 2015

    The Enough Project welcomes the decision by the Government of South Sudan and President Salva Kiir to sign the compromise peace agreement, adding his signature to that of armed opposition leader Dr. Riek Machar and other stakeholders, to hopefully bring their country’s brutal civil war to an end.

    Read the full statement below.

  • Aug 25, 2015

    On August 25, the Enough Project released a public statement addressing U.S. Special Envoy for Sudan and South Sudan Donald Booth’s diplomatic visit to Sudan. Ambassador Booth should use this trip to enhance U.S. policy on Sudan by creating the financial pressure necessary to target the individuals and entities that benefit from pervasive corruption and ongoing conflict in Sudan.

  • Aug 12, 2015

    South Sudan’s warring factions have one last chance to end their country’s 20-month civil war and sign a compromise agreement proposed by the Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD) mediators, who are leading negotiations. The U.S. government has promised serious consequences if the parties fail to meet the August 17 deadline set by the international community. During his recent visit to East Africa, President Obama convened a roundtable on South Sudan with the presidents of Kenya and Uganda, Ethiopia’s prime minister, Sudan’s foreign minister, and the African Union Commission’s chairperson to build consensus on the need to collectively pressure South Sudan’s warring parties toward peace. In no uncertain terms, President Obama warned that the United States is prepared to move forward with additional available tools to apply greater pressure on the parties. When speaking to the African Union, he said that if the two sides miss the deadline, “the international community must raise the costs of intransigence.” At a press conference in the region with Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn, President Obama explained, “we also think that [the United States] can be a mechanism for additional leverage on the parties, who, up until this point, have proven very stubborn and have not yet risen to the point where they are looking out for the interests of their nation as opposed to their particular self-interests. And that transition has to take place, and it has to take place now.”

  • Jul 23, 2015

    President Obama’s upcoming trip to Ethiopia and Kenya offers an opportunity to reorient U.S. government policies to move beyond threats and focus on a much more robust strategy of disrupting and ultimately dismantling this system, which is funding, fueling, and profiting from the conflict in South Sudan.

  • Jul 10, 2015

    Testimony of Akshaya Kumar, Enough Project Sudan and South Sudan Policy Analyst, before the United States Congress Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission hearing on “The Current Human Rights Situation in South Sudan,” given on July 10, 2015.

  • Jun 10, 2015

    Political Economy of African Wars Series

    "Neighborhood Watch: Mobilizing Regional Action for Peace in South Sudan" is the first in the Enough Project's new series of in-depth, field research-driven reports on the dynamics of profit and power fueling war in the Horn, East and Central Africa. Violent kleptocracies dominate the political landscape of this region, leading to protracted conflicts marked by the commission of mass atrocities by state and non-state actors. Enough's Political Economy of African Wars series will focus on the key players in these conflicts, their motivations, how they benefit from the evolving war economies, and what policies might be most effective in changing the calculations of those orchestrating the violence–including both incentives and pressures for peace.

  • Mar 4, 2015

    Gold coming from Sudan is conflict-affected, high-risk, and helping to destabilize the country’s main conflict-zones of Darfur, Blue Nile and South Kordofan. This brief, which stems from our new report Fool's Gold: The Case for Scrutinizing Sudan's Conflict Gold Trade, provides an overview of conflict-affected gold in Sudan and offers policy recommendations.

  • Jan 21, 2015

    From the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) to the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) to Al-Shabaab, many of the world’s most infamous and destabilizing armed actors today finance their activities in part through the illegal exploitation and trade of natural resources. Theft in the context of armed conflict constitutes the war crime of pillage, which is punishable in most domestic jurisdictions and at the International Criminal Court (ICC).

    Depuis l'État islamique d'Irak et du Levant (ISIL : Islamic State of Irak and the Levant) de l’Armée de Résistance du Seigneur (LRA : Lord’s Resistance Army) jusqu'à  Al-Shabaab, de nombreuses forces armées, les plus infâmes et les plus déstabilisatrices du monde d’aujourd'hui, financent en partie leurs activités grâce au trafic et à l'exploitation illicites des ressources naturelles. Tout vol commis dans le cadre des conflits armés est considéré comme crime de guerre de pillage, lequel est punissable dans la plupart des juridictions nationales ainsi qu’à la Cour Pénale Internationale (CPI).
  • Dec 17, 2014

    There is no doubt that some form of a national dialogue will be a key ingredient to a comprehensive peace in Sudan.  But, to have a transformative effect on governance, that process needs to be meaningful, genuine, and inclusive. Despite hopeful signals in September 2014, Sudan’s nascent national dialogue process is currently none of those things. As it stands right now, the dialogue’s format remains imbalanced, exclusive and restrictive.  Beyond problems with the structure of the process, the Sudanese government’s actions outside of the dialogue forum have further undermined prospects for genuine discourse about the way forward.  But, this could change, if the Sudanese government decides to engage meaningfully and demonstrates its commitment by fulfilling six preconditions, including an alternate neutral administration for the dialogue. International stakeholders now have an opportunity to help to rebalance power dynamics and revitalize the much-needed but deeply compromised process.

  • Nov 20, 2014

    Our policy analyst Akshaya Kumar argues that the desperate situation of the people in rebel-controlled areas, the Sudanese government’s aid blockade, and indiscriminate attacks on civilians, along with statements recently attributed to senior commanders in the government forces, lay the foundation for a case of crimes against humanity by extermination.

  • Nov 20, 2014

    For the third year running, the Enough Project is publishing a needs assessment conducted by anonymous researchers with access to rebel-held parts of Sudan’s South Kordofan state. An independent humanitarian expert has endorsed the methodology of the study, “Life Under Siege” which paints a holistic picture of a place where internationals are not given permission to enter.

  • Nov 7, 2014

    The Enough Project, United to End Genocide, and Voices for Sudan sent a letter today to the 15 members of the United Nations Security Council urging the Council to vote in favor of the draft resolution on global targeted sanctions currently before them.

  • Nov 4, 2014

    The Enough Project, along with Human Rights Watch, Amnesty International, Oxfam and a coalition of other international and local human rights organizations signed a letter calling on members of the Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD) to immediately impose a comprehensive arms embargo on South Sudan. We call on IGAD to issue a communiqué requesting that the United Nations (UN) Security Council adopt a resolution imposing a comprehensive international arms embargo.

  • Oct 3, 2014

    ​The Good Lie, a new Warner Brothers film, depicts the shared experiences of several of the "Lost Boys and Girls of Sudan" during the Second Sudanese Civil War and is a powerful point of entry into the story of peace and conflict in South Sudan. This discussion guide can be used in the classroom or among youth groups to enhance and inform conversations surrounding the film.

  • Oct 1, 2014

    South Sudan achieved independence from Sudan in 2011, marking a major milestone and promising to bring with it peace, prosperity, equality, and development. However, in December 2013, a political power struggle unleashed a new and brutal armed conflict that continues today and civilians are paying the highest price.