Reports

  • Kasper Agger, Jun 17, 2015
    Warlord Business

    Political Economy of African Wars Series

    “Warlord Business” is the second in a new series of in-depth, field research-driven reports on the dynamics of profit and power fueling war in the Horn, East and Central Africa. Violent kleptocracies dominate the political landscape of this region, leading to protracted conflicts marked by the commission of mass atrocities by state and non-state actors. Enough's Political Economy of African Wars series will focus on the key players in these conflicts, their motivations, how they benefit from the evolving war economies, and what policies might be most effective in changing the calculations of those orchestrating the violence–including both incentives and pressures for peace.

  • Enough Team, Jun 10, 2015
    Neighborhood Watch

    Political Economy of African Wars Series

    "Neighborhood Watch: Mobilizing Regional Action for Peace in South Sudan" is the first in the Enough Project's new series of in-depth, field research-driven reports on the dynamics of profit and power fueling war in the Horn, East and Central Africa. Violent kleptocracies dominate the political landscape of this region, leading to protracted conflicts marked by the commission of mass atrocities by state and non-state actors. Enough's Political Economy of African Wars series will focus on the key players in these conflicts, their motivations, how they benefit from the evolving war economies, and what policies might be most effective in changing the calculations of those orchestrating the violence–including both incentives and pressures for peace.

  • Omer Ismail, Jun 3, 2015
    The Many Faces of al-Bashir

    Recent shifts in the politics of the Persian Gulf could benefit the ruling coterie in economically isolated and politically ostracized Sudan. Sudan’s inclusion in the broader Arab coalition against the Houthis in Yemen, the recent agreement in April on a framework for a nuclear deal to be finalized between Iran, the United States, and others, and the rapprochement between Ethiopia and Egypt sealed by the Nile waters agreement, all dramatically alter Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir’s view of his opportunities. At first glance, these evolving relationships may make it harder for American policymakers, who are now part of the same fighting coalition as Sudan in Yemen, to exercise pressure on Sudan’s ruling National Congress Party (NCP). However, Western diplomats are not without options. Sudan’s growing economic dependence on Persian Gulf countries means that those countries now have even more leverage to press the NCP to agree to the political reforms and the negotiated compromises with the opposition that are needed to forge a lasting peace. American policymakers seeking to influence outcomes in Sudan should take advantage of their strong ties with the Gulf and the Gulf’s strong ties to Sudan.

  • Enough Team, May 1, 2015

    While significant progress has been made towards creating a conflict-free minerals trade in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, gold continues to fund armed commanders. Thanks to on the ground initiatives in Congo, international activist and industry pressure, and federal legislation in the United States, 70 percent of the 3T mines (tin, tantalum, and tungsten) are now free of armed groups and Congo’s army, according to the International Peace Information Service. However, only 35 percent of gold mines in eastern Congo are conflict-free, with abusive Congolese army commanders and armed groups still profiting from the trade.

  • Fidel Bafilemba and Sasha Lezhnev, Apr 21, 2015

    A trade in illegally mined and smuggled “conflict gold” is fueling both high-level military corruption and violent rebel groups in eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), according to a new report by the Enough Project. “Congo’s Conflict Gold Rush: Bringing gold into the legal trade in the Democratic Republic of Congo,” by the Enough Project’s Fidel Bafilemba and Sasha Lezhnev, offers an in-depth portrait of the conflict gold supply chain, from muddy artisanal mines where gold is dug out with shovels and pick-axes, through illicit transport routes in Uganda, Burundi, and Dubai. Based on seven months of field research at mines and in regional capitals, the report provides an in-depth discussion of solutions to the conflict gold supply chain.

  • John Prendergast, Mar 13, 2015

    In an open letter to Secretary of State John Kerry, Ambassador Susan Rice, and Ambassador Samantha Power, Enough Project Founding Director John Prendergast supports the U.S. Government's ongoing efforts and proposes specific steps for enhancing engagement toward the current South Sudan peace process.

  • John Prendergast, Mar 4, 2015
    John Prendergast testifying before TLHRC

    Testimony of John Prendergast, Founding Director of the Enough Project, before the United States Congress Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission hearing on “Human Rights Violations in Sudan,” given on March 4, 2015.

  • Akshaya Kumar, Mar 4, 2015

    Gold coming from Sudan is conflict-affected, high-risk, and helping to destabilize the country’s main conflict-zones of Darfur, Blue Nile and South Kordofan, according to this new Enough Project report. "Fool's Gold: The Case for Scrutinizing Sudan's Conflict Gold Trade" details how civilians living in communities near these Sudanese gold mining sites have suffered killings, mass rape, and the torching of their homes and fields at the hands of armed groups, including the Sudanese army and government-backed tribal militias. The report also calls for urgent action by the United States, the United Nations, and the international gold industry to red-flag and sanction gold from Sudan as conflict-affected.

  • Enough Team, Mar 4, 2015

    Gold coming from Sudan is conflict-affected, high-risk, and helping to destabilize the country’s main conflict-zones of Darfur, Blue Nile and South Kordofan. This brief, which stems from our new report Fool's Gold: The Case for Scrutinizing Sudan's Conflict Gold Trade, provides an overview of conflict-affected gold in Sudan and offers policy recommendations.

  • the undersigned, Mar 3, 2015

    Today, 22 organizations and individuals who both work in and advocate for stability, peace, and prosperity in the DRC and the entire Great Lakes Region of Africa signed a letter to Secretary of State John Kerry asking him to appoint a new, high-level Special Envoy to continue the great work of Senator Feingold and seize advantage of the momentum that has been generated through U.S. engagement in this region of the world.