Eastern Congo

Update on Congo violence: Envoys call for restraint, timely electoral process

The Enough Project is deeply concerned about the violence occurring in Kinshasa, Goma, and other cities in Congo. Today, the Team of International Envoys for the Great Lakes region (comprised of UN Special Envoy for the Great Lakes Said Djinnit, UN Special Representative and Head of MONUSCO Martin Kobler, AU Special Representative for the Great Lakes Boubacar Diarra, EU Senior Coordinator for the Great Lakes Koen Vervaeke, US Special Envoy for the Great Lakes and the DRC Russell D. Feingold and Belgium Special Envoy for the Great Lakes Frank de Coninck) issued a helpful statement on the issue. They called for restraint on all sides, the need for the Congolese government to establish a credible and timely electoral process, and for all internet and phone communications to not be curtailed.     Read More »

Ending Grand Theft on a Global Scale: Prosecuting the War Crime of Pillage

M23 rebel fighters north of Goma, DRC (2012) AP Photo/Jerome Delay

In Enough Project Policy Analyst Holly Dranginis’ latest report, Grand Theft Global: Prosecuting the War Crime of Natural Resource Pillage in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Dranginis provides an inside look at why the widespread theft of minerals in Congo has gone on unpunished, and how policymakers and legal practitioners can help advance cases.  Grand Theft Global is the result of research in Congo, The Hague, and Washington, DC, including dozens of interviews with Congolese attorneys, international prosecutors, and local communities affected by pillage and the violence it enables.  Read More »

Grand Theft Global - Prosecuting the War Crime of Natural Resource Pillage in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

From the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) to the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) to Al-Shabaab, many of the world’s most infamous and destabilizing armed actors today finance their activities in part through the illegal exploitation and trade of natural resources. Theft in the context of armed conflict constitutes the war crime of pillage, which is punishable in most domestic jurisdictions and at the International Criminal Court (ICC).

Depuis l'État islamique d'Irak et du Levant (ISIL : Islamic State of Irak and the Levant) de l’Armée de Résistance du Seigneur (LRA : Lord’s Resistance Army) jusqu'à  Al-Shabaab, de nombreuses forces armées, les plus infâmes et les plus déstabilisatrices du monde d’aujourd'hui, financent en partie leurs activités grâce au trafic et à l'exploitation illicites des ressources naturelles. Tout vol commis dans le cadre des conflits armés est considéré comme crime de guerre de pillage, lequel est punissable dans la plupart des juridictions nationales ainsi qu’à la Cour Pénale Internationale (CPI).

LRA commander Ongwen should be transferred to ICC, support to justice & reconciliation in LRA-affected areas should be increased

Senior Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) commander Dominic Ongwen, who surrendered Tuesday in the Central African Republic, should be transferred to the International Criminal Court to face charges of crimes against humanity and war crimes.  Read More »

Attacks in Beni, eastern Congo. Part 2: Violence continues, authorities launch gradual response

In the first post in a series about a number of deadly civilian attacks in Beni territory in North Kivu, we described the initial surge of violence in October, and tensions between local populations and the authorities meant to protect them – local government and MONUSCO peacekeepers. In this post, we begin with the last of the October attacks to report on the deadly 2 months that followed.  Read More »

Attacks in Beni, eastern Congo. Part 1: A surge in violence fuels civilian discontent

Since early October, Beni territory in eastern Congo has suffered a series of horrific attacks, allegedly perpetrated by the Allied Democratic Forces (ADF). The violence, often targeting women and children, has resulted in the deaths of more that 250 civilians. As the attacks continued unabated, tensions between the local postulations and UN and Congolese forces have increased.  Read More »

ThinkProgress: 9 Things You Need to Know about Conflict Minerals

The armed conflict in eastern Congo that has killed over 5.4 million people is financed largely by trading minerals used in an array of common consumer products around the world, from electronics to jewelry. Recent critiques by the Cato Institute and in the Washington Post have questioned whether current local and international initiatives to combat the problem are causing more harm than good. Last month, the Enough Project’s U.S. and Congo-based teams visited mining communities in eastern Congo to get an updated assessment on conflict minerals. To help you better understand what's at stake, we've provided 9 things you need to know about conflict minerals on ThinkProgress.  Read More »

Daily Beast Op-ed: Aaron Rodgers Targets Congo War, Conflict Minerals

In an op-ed featured on The Daily Beast, John Prendergast is raising the challenge to stop the flow of conflict minerals – and making the case that doing so is fundamental to stopping the decades-long conflict in Eastern Congo. Joining voices with activists from Super Bowl winner Aaron Rodgers of the Green Bay Packers to Nobel Peace Prize Nominee Dr. Denis Mukwege of Panzi Hospital, Prendergast says “reforming this trade is part of a comprehensive strategy, including regional governance reforms, to help end the war.”  Read More »

Going for Gold: Engaging the Jewelry Industry in Responsible Gold Sourcing in Africa’s Great Lakes Region

In the Democratic Republic of the Congo (“Congo”), gold is a major financial lifeline for armed actors. Fortunately, jewelry retailers and consumers can play important roles to help end the conflict gold trade and the suffering it causes, together with the actions of governments. The Enough Project has engaged with the largest jewelry retailers in an effort to encourage companies to use their power and resources in more robust, effective ways to support responsible sourcing in Congo and the Great Lakes Region. Two companies in particular—Tiffany & Co. and Signet Jewelers—have demonstrated clear leadership in beginning to address the conflict gold issue by taking proactive steps to set up supply chain controls, contribute to solutions on the ground in Congo, and support the communities affected by mining and violence in Congo.

Learn More About the #CongoGold Jewelry Leader Review and Campaign here.


Seven ideas to help end the FDLR rebel group in Congo

In a new report, “How to Dismantle a Deadly Militia” the Enough Project sets out seven key non-military approaches to help ending the FDLR’s ability to continue to threaten peace and security in eastern Congo and the region.  Read More »

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