Sudan and South Sudan

Activist Brief: Modernized Sanctions for Sudan: Unfinished Business for the Obama Administration

A new Enough Project report details how, in its final nine months, the Obama administration has an unprecedented opportunity to build on emerging leverage with the Sudanese government and deploy new targeted financial pressures to support a peace deal in Sudan.

A New Approach to Sudan Sanctions: New Report

The Enough Project released its latest report, “Modernized Sanctions for Sudan: Unfinished Business for the Obama Administration,” outlining a new strategy that the United States must take towards Sudan. The approach recognizes the current unprecedented opportunity to build on emerging leverage with the Sudanese government and deploy new targeted financial pressures to support a peace deal in Sudan.  Read More »

Modernized Sanctions for Sudan: Unfinished Business for the Obama Administration

Peace efforts in Sudan have failed in the past, in large part because of insufficient international leverage over the Sudanese government, but now the Obama administration has an unprecedented opportunity in its final months in office to make a policy investment that could pay big dividends. The Obama administration can further build on new, emerging leverage with the Khartoum regime in support of an inclusive peace deal in Sudan leading to a transition to democracy. 

Modernized Sanctions for Sudan

South African Court Rejects Impunity: “Decision Not to Arrest Bashir Inconsistent with Law”

Earlier this week, South Africa’s Supreme Court of Appeal (SCA) rejected the government’s appeal of a lower court decision over its failure to arrest suspected international criminal and Sudan President Omar al-Bashir. Bashir traveled to South Africa last June to attend an African Union (AU) summit. The lower court held that the government violated South African law by allowing Bashir to leave the country before a court could rule on whether South African officials should arrest him due to his two outstanding International Criminal Court (ICC) arrest warrants.  Read More »

Enough Project in NY Times: Root Cause & Solutions to the War in South Sudan

In a riveting dispatch for the New York Times from South Sudan "Where the Soldiers Are Scarier Than the Crocodiles", Nicholas Kristof documents the terror and struggles of people who have sought refuge from war, hiding with their families in swamps and marshy islands to escape attacks by soldiers. Kristof says no solutions are ideal, but calls for "an arms embargo and sanctions aimed at the assets of individuals on each side of the civil war. Make leaders pay a price for intransigence, instead of profiting from it."  Read More »

Nubians Protest Nile River Dams

Activists protest in front of the Embassy of Saudi Arabia in Washington, D.C.

On March 10, 2016, several Sudanese organizations and activists protested in front of the Embassy of Saudi Arabia in Washington, D.C. expressing their concern over the Saudi government’s agreement to finance dam projects in Nubia. With proposals to build three dams along the Nile River, the benefit of enhanced hydroelectric power does not outweigh the destruction of one of the world’s richest archaeological sites and the consequences of large-scale civilian displacement.  Read More »

Hunger in Sudan: Government Policy, Civilian Suffering

New IDP Arrivals at Um Baru, North Darfur (January 2015)

Hunger and food insecurity have been far too common in Sudan. As severe drought and famine swept through East Africa in the 1980s, the Sudanese acutely felt the effects of these deprivations. Darfur, in particular, was one of the most drought-affected regions. About 20 years later, at least 180,000 Sudanese died from hunger and related disease during the Darfur genocide in 2003 and 2004.  Read More »

UN Peacekeepers’ Role Questioned in Wake of Mass Killings in Malakal

Following the deaths of 18 civilians in a displaced people’s camp run by the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) in the city of Malakal on February 18, reporters are beginning to piece together details on the incident.  Read More »

South Sudan’s Central Bank Demands Accountability for U.S. Dollar Auction

Soon after South Sudan devalued its currency in December 2015, the central bank authorized the auction of U.S dollars to commercial banks to offset the cost of devaluation which had caused the South Sudanese pound to lose its value by 84 percent. Millions of dollars were auctioned to the commercial banks as a result of this move.  Read More »

New Brief: Addressing South Sudan’s Economic and Fiscal Crisis

As conditions for ordinary South Sudanese people continue to deteriorate, government mismanagement is combining with economic and political crises to create a “toxic situation,” according to a newly released Enough Project brief. The brief, Addressing South Sudan’s Economic and Fiscal Crisis, calls for action by the international community, and also for commitment by the warring parties to put the needs of the people ahead of their own.  Read More »

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