Sudan and South Sudan

EU & Troika Statements on Kiir's Announcement on Creation of 28 South Sudan States

On October 6, the European Union Delegation to South Sudan and the Troika (Norway, the United Kingdom, and the United States) issued statements on President Salva Kiir's very concerning announcement that he plans to create 28 states out of the existing 10.   Read More »

South Sudan's Oil Sector Facing Challenges: Journalist

In a recent piece, journalist Richard Nield writes about the challenges facing South Sudan's oil sector with September being the first month since independence that the government tendered just one cargo.  Read More »

Human Rights Attorney: UK Govt Complicit in Abuses in Sudan

The United Kingdom government is complicit in human rights abuses in Sudan according to human rights attorney Ali Agab Nour.   Read More »

African Union Meeting on South Sudan

Date: 
Sep 24, 2015

 

Groups Urge Support for Hybrid Court

(Nairobi, September 24, 2015) – The African Union Peace and Security Council will meet in New York on September 26, 2015, on the margins of the United Nations General Assembly to discuss South Sudan

In a letter to the African Union (AU) chairperson, Nkosazana Dlamini Zuma, the Enough Project joined with 37 South Sudanese and international organizations, urging that the meeting should be used to support the establishment of an AU commission-created hybrid court for South Sudan. The court would try grave crimes committed in the country’s recent conflict, as provided for in the August peace agreement between the parties to the conflict. The organizations also urged Dlamini Zuma to help ensure the long-awaited publication of the report by the AU Commission of Inquiry on South Sudan. 

“An independent hybrid court could make an essential contribution for South Sudanese, who are looking for justice as part of sustainable peace following a war that has destroyed civilian towns and villages, killed thousands of civilians, displaced over 2 million people, and plunged much of the country into humanitarian crisis,” the groups said in their letter. “The AU Commission should make clear its support for the hybrid court from the outset.” 

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For media inquiries or interview requests, please contact:
Greg Hittelman, Director of Communications, +1 310 717 0606gh@enoughproject.org 

About THE ENOUGH PROJECT

The Enough Project seeks to build leverage for peace and justice in Africa by helping to create real consequences for the perpetrators and facilitators of genocide and other mass atrocities. Enough aims to counter rights-abusing armed groups and violent kleptocratic regimes that are fueled by grand corruption, transnational crime and terror, and the pillaging and trafficking of minerals, ivory, diamonds, and other natural resources. Enough conducts field research in conflict zones, develops and advocates for policy recommendations, supports social movements in affected countries, and mobilizes public campaigns. Learn more – and join us – at www.EnoughProject.org

38 NGOs Push AU Chair for Action on South Sudan

In a letter to the African Union (AU) Commission Chairperson, Dr. Nkosazana Dlamini Zuma, the Enough Project joined 37 South Sudanese and international organizations urging her to utilize the upcoming AU Peace and Security Council meeting on South Sudan as an opportunity to create pressure to establish the Hybrid Court for South Sudan.  Read More »

NGOs Release Joint Statement Today as Angola, Russia Put Hold on Security Council Targeted Sanctions on South Sudan

Date: 
Sep 15, 2015

 

Enough, Human Rights Watch, and Amnesty urge Security Council to impose new targeted sanctions

September 15, 2015 - The Russian and Angolan governments today chose to put a hold on the proposed imposition of UN Security Council sanctions on a leading South Sudan government official and leading rebel leader. This blocking action undermines the pledge by the Security Council to impose serious consequences for those obstructing peace in South Sudan.

To reinforce the importance of holding perpetrators accountable for human rights abuses, the Enough Project, Human Rights Watch, and Amnesty International issued a joint statement today. The statement calls for further targeted sanctions on individuals responsible for crimes under international law and serious violations of human rights in South Sudan, as well as imposition of a comprehensive arms embargo.

John Prendergast, Founding Director of the Enough Project, said: "It is imperative that continued human rights abuses and ceasefire violations in South Sudan be met with real consequences from the international community.  Decisions are being made on both the government and rebel side to undermine the implementation of the peace deal. If there is no cost for that intransigence and for the human rights crimes that result, then we can expect the war to continue, business as usual."

Link to today’s joint statement by the Enough Project, Human Rights Watch, and Amnesty International: http://eno.ug/1Ko5tZz

Read the full statement below:

September 15, 2015

Dear Ambassador,

We understand the UN Security Council will deliberate this week on the situation in South Sudan.

As you know, although South Sudan’s President Salva Kiir and armed opposition leader Dr. Riek Machar signed a binding agreement to end the conflict in their country, fighting has continued in Unity and Upper Nile states. As our organizations have documented in detail, the 21-month conflict in South Sudan has been characterized by war crimes and other acts that may also amount to crimes against humanity, and it has clearly been fueled by impunity.

Given the high probability of continuing serious abuses against civilians as part of the ongoing fighting, we urge you to impose a comprehensive arms embargo.

Since this conflict began, fighting and abuses have forced over 2 million people to flee their homes and thousands of civilians have been killed, often targeted because of their ethnicity or perceived political allegiance. The likelihood of further attacks on civilians in South Sudan remains high. A well-monitored arms embargo can reduce the flow and entry of weapons and military equipment into the country that could be used to commit further crimes against civilians.

The Council should also continue to impose sanctions on individuals responsible for crimes under international law and serious violations and abuses of human rights. While the August peace deal may prove to be an important step forward to ending conflict and abuse in South Sudan, it cannot absolve those most responsible for human rights abuses.

Sincerely,

Amnesty International
Enough Project
Human Rights Watch

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For media inquiries or interview requests, please contact:
Greg Hittelman, Director of Communications, +1 310 717 0606gh@enoughproject.org  

About THE ENOUGH PROJECT
The Enough Project seeks to build leverage for peace and justice in Africa by helping to create real consequences for the perpetrators and facilitators of genocide and other mass atrocities. Enough aims to counter rights-abusing armed groups and violent kleptocratic regimes that are fueled by grand corruption, transnational crime and terror, and the pillaging and trafficking of minerals, ivory, diamonds, and other natural resources. Enough conducts field research in conflict zones, develops and advocates for policy recommendations, supports social movements in affected countries, and mobilizes public campaigns. Learn more – and join us – at www.EnoughProject.org

NGOs Urge UN Security Council to Impose Targeted Sanctions and Arms Embargo in South Sudan

The Enough Project and partners sent letters to the United Nations Security Council, asking them to fulfill their commitment to impose sanctions on individuals who have committed abuses against civilians in South Sudan and calling for an arms embargo.   Read More »

NGOs Urge UN Security Council to Impose Targeted Sanctions and Arms Embargo in South Sudan

The Enough Project, Human Rights Watch, and Amnesty International sent letters to the United Nations Security Council, asking them to fulfill their commitment to impose sanctions on individuals who have committed abuses against civilians in South Sudan and calling for an arms embargo. See letter below.

 

A Most Unwelcome Guest

While it appears that Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir is no longer considering a visit to this year’s United Nations General Assembly, his repeated intentions to travel to U.N. Headquarters in New York raise serious political and ethical challenges, as well as two important legal questions.  Read More »

U.S. Special Envoy Booth's Khartoum Visit: Opportunity to Refocus U.S. Policy on Sudan

Date: 
Aug 25, 2015

Current international approach has done little to end the conflict, address corruption, or prevent mass atrocities, says Enough Project

August 25, 2015 – As U.S. Special Envoy Donald Booth visits Khartoum, the Enough Project published a statement today urging an enhanced policy of increased financial pressures on political elites in Sudan, in order to end ongoing armed conflict and suffering, address corruption, and pave the way for a credible national dialogue. The statement also lauded Ambassador Booth’s willingness to meet with civil society organizations while in Sudan, which demonstrates U.S. support of their important work in an increasingly constrained political environment.

John Prendergast, Founding Director of the Enough Project, said: "As long as it is able to benefit from conflict and silence opposition, the Bashir regime has no incentive to pursue peace. To escalate financial pressure on key decision-makers in Khartoum, the U.S. government should increase targeted sanctions enforcement against political elites and their financial enablers, support stolen asset recovery and return, and open criminal investigations and possible prosecutions into economic crimes where they have a nexus to the United States.”

Omer Ismail, Enough Project Senior Advisor, said: “During his visit to Sudan, Ambassador Booth should make clear that normalized relations with the U.S. government, including U.S. support for debt relief to Sudan under the Highly Indebted Poor Countries Initiative, are not possible until the Sudanese government ends its deliberate and indiscriminate attacks on civilians, stops the obstruction of humanitarian aid, and revamps the framework for the national dialogue to allow a credible, genuine conversation about Sudan’s future.”

Read the full Enough Project statement below:

August 25, 2015 -- The U.S. Special Envoy to Sudan and South Sudan’s visit to Khartoum provides an important opportunity to enhance U.S. policy on Sudan. The current international approach emphasizes endless peace negotiations and a sham national dialogue while allowing the Bashir regime to determine—and effectively deny—humanitarian assistance to vulnerable populations suffering from state violence. This approach has done little to end the conflict, ameliorate suffering, or prevent mass atrocities.

To create the pressure necessary to change calculations in Khartoum, the U.S. government should employ a much broader strategy of financial pressure to target those individuals and entities that profit from this untenable status quo. Ambassador Booth can use his trip to Khartoum to signal this new approach, as follows:

  • Ambassador Booth should make clear that normalized relations with the U.S. government, including U.S. support for debt relief to Sudan under the Highly Indebted Poor Countries Initiative, are not possible until the Sudanese government ends its deliberate and indiscriminate attacks on civilians—including aerial bombardment, stops the obstruction of humanitarian aid, and revamps the framework for the national dialogue to allow a credible, genuine conversation about Sudan’s future.
     
  • To escalate financial pressure on key decision-makers in Khartoum, the U.S. government should increase targeted sanctions enforcement against political elites and their financial enablers, support stolen asset recovery and return, and open criminal investigations and possible prosecutions into economic crimes, like pillage and money laundering, where they have a nexus to the United States. During his engagements with high-level Sudanese officials, Ambassador Booth should emphasize that the U.S. government will move beyond relying on existing blanket country-wide sanctions to also focus more targeted financial pressure on the individuals and entities benefitting from corruption and conflict and preventing peace.
     
  • Ambassador Booth should cite recent examples of violent contestation and displacement around gold mines in Darfur and Blue Nile, and he should publicly state that gold being exported from Sudan is conflict-affected, high-risk, and that Sudan’s gold trade is helping to destabilize Darfur, Blue Nile, and South Kordofan, the country’s main conflict zones.
     
  • Following Ambassador Booth’s visit, the United States should remain committed to Sudanese civil society organizations, especially human rights, anti-corruption, and transparency groups. We appreciate Ambassador Booth’s willingness to meet with civil society organizations while in Sudan, which demonstrates U.S. support of their important work in an increasingly constrained political environment. Beyond this trip, Ambassador Booth should also engage more deeply with the Sudan Call, a coalition that prioritizes a peaceful transition to democratic rule through an inclusive and comprehensive political process, by building the coalition’s capacity to advance a coherent economic policy platform and participate in future negotiations and dialogue.

The Bashir regime has survived for more than 25 years by successfully looting the state and its considerable resource wealth and by responding to all opposition with unsparing violence. Past policy approaches have failed to counter the regime’s ability to finance conflict and to remain in power through corruption and patronage. As long as it is able to benefit from conflict and silence opposition, the regime has no incentive to pursue peace.

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For media inquiries or interview requests, please contact:
Greg Hittelman, Director of Communications, +1 310 717 0606gh@enoughproject.org

About THE ENOUGH PROJECT
The Enough Project seeks to build leverage for peace and justice in Africa by helping to create real consequences for the perpetrators and facilitators of genocide and other mass atrocities. Enough aims to counter rights-abusing armed groups and violent kleptocratic regimes that are fueled by grand corruption, transnational crime and terror, and the pillaging and trafficking of minerals, ivory, diamonds, and other natural resources. Enough conducts field research in conflict zones, develops and advocates for policy recommendations, supports social movements in affected countries, and mobilizes public campaigns. Learn more – and join us – at www.EnoughProject.org

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