Colin Thomas-Jensen

U.S. Envoy: Sudan Not Terror Sponsor, Time to Lift Sanctions - McClatchy

Date: 
Jul 30, 2009
Author: 
Grace Chung

WASHINGTON — The U.S. special envoy to Sudan said Thursday that the United States should drop its designation of Sudan as a state sponsor of terrorism and "unwind" sanctions that it's maintained since President Bill Clinton applied the label in 1993.

Ambassador Scott Gration, a retired army general, said that maintaining the designation for Sudan would be a "political decision" that was "backed by no evidence" and was hindering U.S. development goals in southern Sudan. 

Continue reading here.

Prosecuting Heads of State - Al Jazeera

Date: 
Jul 21, 2009

 Watch Enough's Policy Advisor Colin Thomas-Jensen's appearance on The Riz Khan Show.

The Backstory on Today's Sudan Ruling - Passport, ForeignPolicy.com

Date: 
Jul 22, 2009
Author: 
Elizabeth Dickinson

When we published the 10 Stories You Missed in 2008 late last year, we couldn't have guessed how much this one would keep popping up: conflict in Southern Sudan stands to escalate, we reported. Today, a court ruling on one border town's boundaries sets the stage for how things could unfold in coming months. 

Abyei has always been, literally, at the center of the conflict between the North and South. Both sides armed proxies in the area during the civil war. Despite the 2005 Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA), many factions remain armed in anticipation of a referendum in 2011, in which the South can decide between autonomy and independence from the rest of Sudan. The risk of conflict at that time is real. Says Enough Project's Colin Thomas-Jensen, "There is a genuine reluctance on part of Sudan People's Liberation Movement, [the ruling party in the South], to disarm its proxies when they know they might need them again."  

Continue reading here.

Arbitrators to Rule on Disputed Sudan Region - The Associated Press

Date: 
Jul 22, 2009
Author: 
Mike Corder

THE HAGUE, Netherlands -- An international arbitration tribunal is ruling Wednesday on the boundaries of a disputed oil rich region on the border between northern and southern Sudan.

The Hague-based Permanent Court of Arbitration's decision on the Abyei region's borders is seen as a major test of the fragile 2005 peace deal that ended more than 20 years of civil war that killed more than 2 million people in Sudan. 

Continue reading here.

Borders of Sudan's Oil-Rich Region Shrink - Time Magazine

Date: 
Jul 22, 2009
Author: 
Nick Wadhams

Even though Sudan's civil war officially ended four years ago, tensions continued to fester between the country's north and south over a region rich in oil and symbolism. But on Wednesday, an international panel decided to shrink the borders of the disputed Abyei region, a move that may strengthen Sudan's fragile peace. 

The Permanent Court of Arbitration's remapping of the Abyei region reduces its size by more than a third. The new borders award several major oil fields to the north Sudanese government of President Omar al-Bashir but also make it more likely that the region will become part of south Sudan when the people of Abyei vote on their future in 2011.

Continue reading here.

Court Redraws Disputed Area in Sudan - The New York Times

Date: 
Jul 22, 2009
Author: 
Sharon Otterman

An international tribunal redefined the borders of a disputed oil-rich region between north and south Sudan on Wednesday. The ruling seeks to defuse a thorny issue in the 2005 peace agreement ending one of Africa’s longest civil wars by splitting the contested zone between the two sides.

In its ruling, the tribunal, seated at the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, overruled a decision by an international commission that Sudan’s government rejected four years ago.

Continue reading here.

STRATEGY PAPER: Chad’s Domestic Crisis Is the Achilles Heel For Peacemaking in Darfur

Date: 
Jul 7, 2009
Author: 
Eileen White Read

 

Contact
Eileen White Read, 202.741.6376
eread@enoughproject.org
 

 

STRATEGY PAPER: Chad’s Domestic Crisis Is the Achilles Heel For Peacemaking in Darfur
 

 

READ the strategy paper.

WASHINGTON, D.C. –While the international community remains seized with the crisis in Sudan, the inadequacies of conflict resolution efforts in Chad – host to 250,000 Darfuri refugees – continues to negatively impact peacekeeping efforts, says a strategy paper from the Enough Project at the Center for American Progress.

A comprehensive approach to peace in the region must deal aggressively with the persistent internal turmoil in Chad, where the United States is in a unique position to coordinate international pressure on the government to enact genuine political reforms, the strategy paper notes.

“If we want a lasting regional peace there has to be a strategy to deal with Chad's authoritarian governance and state weakness that have kept the country unstable,” says Enough Advisor Omer Ismail, who travels regularly to the region. “A durable regional peace is impossible without a radical change to a coercive Chadian political system that has long been dominated by the rule of the gun.”

Multiple attempts to mediate an end to the proxy war between Sudan and Chad have failed to address what Enough’s policy team identifies as the primary source of the crisis: the internal rot at the center of both Sudan and Chad. Says Enough Policy Advisor Colin Thomas-Jensen, “Diplomacy in Darfur will continue to bear rotten fruit until the international community adopts a regional approach that includes credible efforts to address the internal crises in Sudan and Chad. This requires strategic vision and leadership, which the United States can provide.”

READ the strategy paper.

LISTEN to a podcast by Policy Advisor Colin Thomas-Jensen.

####

For additional information:
VISIT the Enough Project’s blog, Enough Said, for updates on this issue.
FOLLOW the Enough Project on Twitter, http://twitter.com/enoughproject.

The Center for American Progress is a nonpartisan research and educational institute dedicated to promoting a strong, just and free America that ensures opportunity for all. We believe that Americans are bound together by a common commitment to these values and we aspire to ensure that our national policies reflect these values. Enough is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on crises in Sudan, Chad, eastern Congo, northern Uganda, Somalia, and Zimbabwe. Enough’s strategy papers and briefings provide sharp field analysis and targeted policy recommendations based on a “3P” crisis response strategy: promoting durable peace, providing civilian protection, and punishing perpetrators of atrocities. Enough works with concerned citizens, advocates, and policy makers to prevent, mitigate, and resolve these crises. For more information, contact Eileen White Read, 202.741.6376; eread@enoughproject.org.

If you would rather not receive future email messages from Center for American Progress, let us know by clicking here. Center for American Progress, 1333 H St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005-4707 United States.
 

STRATEGY PAPER: Abyei: Sudan’s Next Test

Date: 
Jul 20, 2009
Author: 
Eileen White Read

Contact
Eileen White Read, 202.741.6376
eread@enoughproject.org
 

STRATEGY PAPER:  Abyei: Sudan’s Next Test
 

READ the strategy paper.

WASHINGTON, D.C. – This week's legal decision on the boundary of Abyei - an oil-rich and contested region along the disputed North-South border within Sudan – will be the first major test of recent commitments made in Washington by the two parties to Sudan's 2005 Comprehensive Peace Agreement, or CPA.

The United States has played a critical role in negotiating the Abyei protocol, an agreement to settle the dispute over Abyei’s boundaries. The U.S. and the rest of the international community have a responsibility to ensure that the ruling is respected and that the residents of Abyei and the affected surrounding areas are protected from violence.
 
The ruling on Abyei, expected Wednesday from the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, will occur against a backdrop of increasingly hostile relations between the ruling National Congress Party and the Sudan People's Liberation Movement over a number of unimplemented CPA provisions, including stalled preparations for the general elections in April 2010 and the referendum on southern self-determination, scheduled for 2011.

"How each party responds is a crucial litmus test of each side's will to implement the CPA," says Colin Thomas-Jensen, Enough policy adviser and co-author of the paper. "By extension, their response to the Abyei ruling is a useful barometer for the efficacy of the Obama administration's strategy on Sudan."
 
Enough's latest strategy paper argues that the diplomatic push from the international community to secure renewed commitment from the Sudanese parties on CPA implementation is welcome, and focusing on Abyei is an important step in making these commitments real in the lives of ordinary Sudanese. "If the Abyei dispute relapses into stalemate and violence, the already fragile CPA will be pushed to the breaking point," says Enough Project Policy Assistant Maggie Fick, the report’s co-author.

READ the strategy paper.

LISTEN to a podcast by Maggie Fick.

VIEW a photo essay about Abyei and the issues raised in the strategy paper.

####

For additional information:
VISIT the Enough Project’s blog, Enough Said, for updates on this issue.
FOLLOW the Enough Project on Twitter, http://twitter.com/enoughproject.
 

The Center for American Progress is a nonpartisan research and educational institute dedicated to promoting a strong, just and free America that ensures opportunity for all. We believe that Americans are bound together by a common commitment to these values and we aspire to ensure that our national policies reflect these values. Enough is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on crises in Sudan, Chad, eastern Congo, northern Uganda, Somalia, and Zimbabwe. Enough’s strategy papers and briefings provide sharp field analysis and targeted policy recommendations based on a “3P” crisis response strategy: promoting durable peace, providing civilian protection, and punishing perpetrators of atrocities. Enough works with concerned citizens, advocates, and policy makers to prevent, mitigate, and resolve these crises. For more information, contact Eileen White Read, 202.741.6376; eread@enoughproject.org.
 

If you would rather not receive future email messages from Center for American Progress, let us know by clicking here. Center for American Progress, 1333 H St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005-4707 United States.
 

Abyei Boundary Ruling Expected Wednesday - Voice of America

Date: 
Jul 20, 2009
Author: 
Joe DeCapua

An important ruling is expected Wednesday on a disputed border region in Sudan.  The ruling from the Abyei Arbitration Tribunal could determine the boundaries of the oil-rich Abyei region and directly affect the 2005 Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA).  The CPA ended a long civil war between northern and southern Sudan.

Monday, the ENOUGH Project issued a new strategy paper on Abyei.  Colin Thomas-Jensen, policy advisor and co-author of the paper, spoke to VOA about why he considers Abyei the next big test for Sudan.

Keep reading.

Syndicate content