Press Releases

Zainab Bangura, Samantha Power, and Robin Wright to Lead International Women's Day Discussion on Women, Conflict, and the Prevention of Sexual Violence

Date: 
Feb 28, 2014

Enough Project Press Advisory

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Zainab Bangura, Samantha Power, and Robin Wright to Lead International Women’s Day Discussion on Women, Conflict, and the Prevention of Sexual Violence

Washington, D.C. — In honor of International Women's Day, the Enough Project and the Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict will co-host a high-level special event on Thursday, March 6, at United Nations headquarters in New York. The discussion, entitled “International Women’s Day: Elevating the Conversation on Ending Sexual Violence in Conflict,” will cover the ways in which women experience conflict, the role of women in Congo’s peace process, efforts to combat the conflict minerals trade, and urgent actions needed to end and prevent sexual violence.

The event will be available via a live webcast to the public and can be followed on social media using the hashtag #ElevatePeace.

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Please join the Enough Project along with the United Nations Office of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict, The Permanent Mission of Japan to the United Nations, and The United Nations Academic Impact Department of Public Information for a special discussion:

International Women’s Day: Elevating the Conversation on Ending Sexual Violence in Conflict

Panelists:      

Zainab Bangura, United Nations Special Representative of the Secretary General on Sexual Violence in Conflict

Samantha Power, United States Ambassador to the United Nations

Robin Wright, Actor and activist

Tim Mohin, Director of Corporate Responsibility at Advanced Micro Devices (AMD), Chair of the Electronics Industry Citizenship Coalition (EICC), and author

Sylvie Maunga Mbanga, Congolese lawyer, advocate, and Program Facilitator, Federal Leadership Institute                             

Moderator:        

John Prendergast, Co-Founder of Enough Project and Satellite Sentinel Project

 

When:                    Thursday, March 6, 2014

                                 6:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. EST

Doors will open at 6:15 p.m. for an arts and activism presentation featuring award-winning filmmaker Paul Freedman and Congolese activists Omékongo Dibinga and Adele Kibasumba prior to the panel discussion at 7pm.

 

Where:                  United Nations Headquarters

                                Economic and Social Council Chamber

                                New York, NY 10017

There will be limited availability of guest panelists to the media following the discussion. For logistical information or if you wish to cover this event, contact Carine Umuhumuza at 202-478-5314 or cumuhumuza@enoughproject.org. All press must RSVP using the link provided.

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The Enough Project is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on the crises in Sudan, South Sudan, eastern Congo, and areas affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough conducts intensive field research, develops practical policies to address these crises, and shares sensible tools to empower citizens and groups working for change. To learn more about Enough, go to www.enoughproject.org.

The United Nations Office of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict provides high-level political advocacy, leadership and awareness-raising to help eradicate the use of sexual violence as a weapon of war.

The United Nations Academic Impact Department of Public Information is a global initiative that aligns institutions of higher education with the United Nations in actively supporting ten universally accepted principles in the areas of human rights, literacy, sustainability and conflict resolution.

The Permanent Mission of Japan to the United Nations represents the Government of Japan and is working towards the realization of several goals on behalf of the Government of Japan, including the maintenance of international peace and security, promotion of the UN development agenda, enhancement of the engagement in human rights, humanitarian and women's issues and the promotion of human security.

Congo: New Opportunity on DDR for Congo Peace Process

Date: 
Feb 27, 2014

ENOUGH PROJECT PRESS RELEASE

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Carine Umuhumuza, cumuhumuza@enoughproject.org, 202-478-5314

Congo: New Opportunity on DDR for Congo Peace Process

Goma, DRC and Nairobi, Kenya – Ahead of the March 5-6 meeting of the International Contact Group on Congo, the Enough Project released a new report today outlining challenges to the successful implementation of the national disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration, or DDR, strategy known as DDR III. The report, “Crafting a Viable DDR Strategy for Congo,” argues that resolving outstanding differences on DDR III must be a priority in the overarching regional peace agenda for the Democratic Republic of Congo.

According to the UN, nearly 8,000 combatants from a range of armed groups have surrendered since the official defeat of M23 in November 2013. Of that 8,000, 2,674 combatants, accompanied by 3,084 dependents, surrendered to the Congolese national army, or FARDC, at the transit camp of Bweremana, in Masisi, North Kivu province. The Enough Project report states that an effective program to rehabilitate ex-combatants is hindered by questions concerning funding, the current security environment, the fate of M23, and where and how to resettle ex-combatants. Additionally, previous DDR programs have been ineffective in the inclusion of justice and accountability while incentivizing defection.

Aaron Hall, co-author of the report and Enough Project Field Consultant, says,

“Implementing a viable and effective national DDR strategy  in eastern Congo is now an urgent issue. New opportunities for the Congolese government and its international partners to establish stability in eastern Congo have become apparent since the signing of the U.N. Peace and Security Framework, and the fall of the M23. However, the speed and efficacy with which they implement a national DDR strategy will to a great extent determine the future of peace and economic growth in the region."

The report urges the United Nations and U.S. Special Envoys to the Great Lakes, Mary Robinson and Russ Feingold, other leaders and donors, and the Congolese government to address these issues before the International Contact Group on Congo meeting on March 5-6. Integrating lessons from previous national DDR strategies can help the Congolese government effectively and swiftly disarm a large portion of armed groups in eastern Congo and reintegrate ex-combatants into the military or provide alternative livelihoods, further incentivizing existing armed groups to surrender to the FARDC.

Timo Mueller, co-author of the report and Enough Project Field Researcher in Congo, says

"The success or failure of the DDR process is a major factor that determines the propensity of renewed violence. At its worst, an ill-designed program might become a conflict driver itself. Implementing partners should draw on the lessons learnt and pay particular attention to the reintegration of combatants, the most difficult part of the DDR process."

The national DDR strategy is one element of the peace process. The report states that it must be implemented in coordination with related regional peace and security agreements, including the U.N. PSC Framework and the International Security Stabilization and Support Strategy, or I4S. Coordinating these efforts will determine the success of DDR efforts and the long-term peace and stability of the region.

Read the report, “Crafting a Viable DDR Strategy for Congo” : http://www.enoughproject.org/files/Crafting-Viable-DDR-Strategy-for-Congo.pdf

John Prendergast to Testify at House Hearing on Sudan and South Sudan

Date: 
Feb 26, 2014
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
 
Contact: Carine Umuhumuza, cumuhumuza@enoughproject.org202-478-5314
 
John Prendergast to Testify at House Hearing on Sudan and South Sudan
 
WASHINGTON, D.C. – Today, John Prendergast, Enough Project Co-Founder, will testify before the U.S. House Committee on Foreign Affairs along with a high-level panel of Sudan experts including the Honorable Donald Booth, Dr. Walid Phares, and Adotei Akwei.
 
Prendergast will discuss the conflicts in Sudan and South Sudan, and the need for a more unified, comprehensive U.S. policy approach that can advance the long-term goals of peace, security, and sovereignty in the Sudans.
 
John Prendergast, Enough Project Co-Founder, says: 
 
"A nightmare scenario is unfolding in this region.  To counter it more effectively, the United States and broader international community need to construct a peace strategy for the Sudans.  At this juncture, the U.S. is largely reacting to fast-developing events on the ground, primarily by deploying its very capable Special Envoy to the region and by providing generous amounts of humanitarian aid.  Given the escalating crisis being faced by the two countries and the threat posed by a regionalization of the wars, a much more robust and proactive approach is needed.  A broader strategy for the two Sudans would at a minimum beef up efforts on four fronts: peace, democracy, accountability, and the leverage to impact these goals."
 
 
 
 
The Enough Project is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on the crises in Sudan, South Sudan, eastern Congo, and areas affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough conducts intensive field research, develops practical policies to address these crises, and shares sensible tools to empower citizens and groups working for change. To learn more about Enough, go to www.enoughproject.org.

South Sudan Field Dispatch: Peace Still Possible Despite Apparent War Crimes

Date: 
Feb 19, 2014

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 

Contact: Carine Umuhumuza, cumuhumuza@enoughproject.org, 202-478-5314

South Sudan Field Dispatch: Peace Still Possible Despite Apparent War Crimes

Washington, D.C.— Recent fighting in South Sudan -- marked by evident war crimes and crimes against humanity -- must be resolved through an inclusive peace process, according to a newly released Enough Project field dispatch authored by Enough Co-Founder John Prendergast. The report, based on interviews in South Sudan and site visits to places where mass atrocities appear to have occurred, documents the impact of fighting between government and opposition forces and allied militias.

The report, “Peace Must Come Soon”, documents the aftermath of violence in the towns of Bor and Juba, with eyewitness accounts from displaced civilians and others on the scene. Heavy fighting and targeted attacks have displaced over 900,000 people, and the International Crisis Group estimates that over ten thousand have been killed since fighting broke out in December. 

Now, the bulk of the fighting is taking place in the Greater Upper Nile region, including in Unity, Jonglei,and Upper Nile states, comprising all of South Sudan’s significant oilfields. While the conflict was sparked by political disputes, the report states that the mobilization of forces by politicians on the basis of ethnicity has fueled and deepened inter-communal conflict. Recruitment of soldiers, including a large number of child soldiers, has continued even after the now-collapsed cessation of hostilities agreement, with a mass mobilization of Nuer militia in Greater Upper Nile and the launch of the government’s recruitment drive throughout South Sudan.

Report author John Prendergast says:

“Though the warring parties disagree strongly about the initial spark for the war, it is clear that actions taken by both is prolonging it. Mass recruitment, often on the basis of ethnicity, the use of child soldiers, ethnic-based targeting, and other actions are deepening the divides between communities and making reconciliation more difficult. It is urgent that this war ends at the negotiating table in Addis and not on the battlefield.”

As negotiations stall in Addis Ababa, the report argues for the preparation of a more inclusive peace process that addresses governance, accountability and reconciliation, security sector reform, and regional interests, citing the crucial role of civil society, political parties and regional partners in consultations and decision-making. Additionally, the report emphasizes the U.S. and international community’s role in supporting negotiations by deploying incentives and pressures to leverage the warring parties toward peace.

Read the report, "South Sudan Field Dispatch: Peace Must Come Soon": http://www.enoughproject.org/reports/south-sudan-field-dispatch-peace-must-come-soon

 

The Enough Project is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on the crises in Sudan, South Sudan, eastern Congo, and areas affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough conducts intensive field research, develops practical policies to address these crises, and shares sensible tools to empower citizens and groups working for change. To learn more about Enough, go to www.enoughproject.org.

Sudan's Periphery Smolders as Focus Turns to South Sudan

Date: 
Jan 30, 2014

Enough Project Press Release
 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:  12:01am EST, January 30, 2014
 
Contact: Carine Umuhumuza, cumuhumuza@enoughproject.org, 202-478-5314
 
WASHINGTON — As South Sudan faces its worst violence since independence, a new Enough Project report urges policymakers to remain vigilant about new developments in Sudan, as armed conflict worsens in Darfur, South Kordofan, and Blue Nile regions and risks going unnoticed.  Senior Enough Project Advisor Omer Ismail and Enough Project Editor/Researcher Jacinth Planer's new report “Forgotten Wars: Sudan’s Periphery Smolders with Focus on South Sudan,” cautions policymakers against a potential binary perspective on conflict in the two Sudans, with the potential for conflict in one area to draw focus from deteriorating conditions elsewhere.
 
Amid escalating violence across South Sudan, to the north, South Kordofan has seen its highest number of bombings and civilian casualties in two years. Air strikes in Blue Nile state have increased in scale and deadliness with the use of new tactics and military equipment. Some 200,000 people are displaced from South Kordofan and Blue Nile, and in 2013 alone over 400,000 Darfuri people were displaced from their homes with heavy air strikes. As the numbers of displaced South Sudanese soar, so too are numbers of those displaced from conflict zones in Sudan. Humanitarian conditions are deteriorating rapidly for large numbers of displaced people who are stranded, with limited access to humanitarian aid, and flanked by violence on multiple sides, leaving them especially vulnerable.
 
Omer Ismail, Enough Project Advisor and co-author of the report, said:

“Civilians fleeing violence are vulnerable and caught between expanding war zones between Sudan and South Sudan. A disconnected perspective on one area—to the exclusion of others—cannot work. Core drivers of violence must be addressed in both countries, or the wars will continue with dangerous and destabilizing consequences.”
 
Sudan and South Sudan Policy Analyst Akshaya Kumar, said:
 
"Maintaining focus on both Sudan and South Sudan at the same time  remains essential. South Sudan has signed a cessation of hostilities and Sudan's President Bashir has spoken of peace talks with rebels in South Kordofan and Blue Nile. There may be signs of hope, but the hardest diplomacy is ahead. Both countries merit more sustained attention."

John Prendergast, Enough Project Co-Founder, said:
 
"Ground attacks have been similarly violent in South Sudan and across the border, but the difference in Sudan is the aerial terror sown by the Sudanese Air Forces. As parties in South Sudan negotiate and monitor ceasefire agreements, our new report highlights a major government offensive in the Nuba Mountains."
 
Read the report, “Forgotten Wars: Sudan’s Periphery Smolders with Focus on South Sudan": http://www.enoughproject.org/files/ForgottenWars.pdf

CAR, South Sudan Turmoil Challenge Counter-LRA Mission

Date: 
Jan 30, 2014

 Enough Project Press Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 12:01am EST, January 30, 2014 

Contact: Carine Umuhumuza, cumuhumuza@enoughproject.org, 202-478-5314

Kampala, Uganda and Washington,DC — U.S. military advisors and African partner forces are facing new difficulties in their mission to end the Lord’s Resistance Army, or LRA, and to capture rebel leader Joseph Kony, because of heightened regional instability and insufficient helicopter support, argues a new Enough Project report. Drawing on field research and interviews, the report, “Counter-LRA Mission Challenged by Regional Turmoil,” analyzes the effect of intensifying conflict in South Sudan and the Central African Republic on the LRA’s tactics and the counter-LRA mission’s resources.

The report’s author, Uganda-based Enough Project field researcher Kasper Agger, says:

“Violence in CAR and South Sudan is diverting attention and military forces from counter-LRA operations and providing a dream scenario for LRA rebels to hide and avoid capture. International resolve to end the LRA must be sustained. History has shown that when the pressure is off, the LRA rebuilds its forces through violent abductions and target vulnerable civilians.”
 
The counter-LRA mission also faces air transportation needs that exceed capacity. African troops and U.S. advisors need additional helicopters to be able to act on timely intelligence, conduct simultaneous operations to track top commanders in multiple locations, resupply deployed troops, protect civilians, and facilitate emergency evacuations. The new report argues that the U.S. government should send additional helicopters that have the speed, versatility, and transport capabilities that could best serve the mission and help counter-LRA forces keep pace with highly mobile LRA rebel groups that operate in vast and isolated areas.

The report also urges the U.N, African Union, European Union, and U.S. to maintain their current levels of financial, military, and diplomatic support for the AU-led efforts against the LRA to sustain momentum in the counter-LRA mission.

Read the report, "Counter-LRA Mission Challenged by Regional Turmoil":  http://www.enoughproject.org/files/Counter-LRA%20Mission%20Challenged%20by%20Regional%20Turmoil.pdf

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The Enough Project is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on the crises in Sudan, South Sudan, eastern Congo, and areas affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough conducts intensive field research, develops practical policies to address these crises, and shares sensible tools to empower citizens and groups working for change. To learn more about Enough, go to www.enoughproject.org.

Press Advisory: Cessation of Hostilities in South Sudan Just the First Step

Date: 
Jan 23, 2014

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Today, South Sudan’s government and opposition forces signed a cessation of hostilities agreement in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Following weeks of intense mediated talks, this agreement is just the first step on South Sudan's long road to a durable peace. Violence in South Sudan began in late December, and negotiations had been deadlocked over the issue of 11 political detainees, whom opposition forces, led by former Vice President Riek Machar, wanted to be freed before discussing a ceasefire.

John Prendergast, Enough Project Co- Founder, says:

"Though important, the signing is just a small first step on a long road to peace. If an inclusive peace process is not constructed that seeks to address root causes, the conflict will continue, with deadly consequences."

Akshaya Kumar, Enough Project Sudan and South Sudan analyst, says:

 "In South Sudan, the hardest negotiations are still ahead. Even if all combatants lay down their arms as a result of today's agreement - which is far from guaranteed - a sustainable resolution to the crisis will require an inclusive national dialogue around the country's governance framework, a commitment to accountability and security sector reform."

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The Enough Project is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on the crises in Sudan, South Sudan, eastern Congo, and areas affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough conducts intensive field research, develops practical policies to address these crises, and shares sensible tools to empower citizens and groups working for change. To learn more about Enough, go towww.enoughproject.org.

Press Advisory: John Prendergast to Testify at Senate Hearing on South Sudan

Date: 
Jan 9, 2014

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The Enough Project’s Co-founder, John Prendergast, will testify Thursday, January 9 at 10:15am at the Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing, “The Situation in South Sudan", along with a panel of Africa and Sudan experts including Ambassador Princeton Lyman, The Honorable Linda Thomas Greenfield, The Honorable Nancy Lindborg, and The Honorable Kate Almquist Knopf.

Prendergast will discuss the recent violence in South Sudan, and a path forward for peace.

Enough Project Co-Founder John Prendergast states: 

"A quick and dirty power-sharing deal is not the answer to South Sudan’s problems. Simply redistributing power to combatant factions on the basis of the territory under their control would be a huge error. A cessation of hostilities is a first order priority, but what follows must be much more inclusive, transparent, and multi-layered than any of the processes that have come before if sustainable peace is to have a chance in South Sudan."

Read John Prendergast's full testimony here.

 

The Enough Project is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on the crises in Sudan, South Sudan, eastern Congo, and areas affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough conducts intensive field research, develops practical policies to address these crises, and shares sensible tools to empower citizens and groups working for change. To learn more about Enough, go to www.enoughproject.org.

 

Enough Project Applauds Madison's Resolution to go Conflict Free

Date: 
Dec 5, 2013

Enough Project Media Advisory

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Carine Umuhumuza, cumuhumuza@enoughproject.org, 202-478-5314

The Madison City Council in Wisconsin passed a resolution earlier this week symbolically declaring the city conflict free. The resolution comes after nearly two years of a growing student movement at University of Wisconsin-Madison that campaigned the city and University to denounce the use of minerals that fuel violence and change their electronics purchasing practices to favor verifiable conflict-free products.

Last month, student activists in Madison, WI seized energy from a rally for a conflict-free Congo with Green Bay Packers Quarterback Aaron Rodgers and celebrity activist Emmanuelle Chriqui. Their hard work was realized on Tuesday, December 3, 2013 when City Council leaders unanimously approved a city resolution (RES-13-00898).

Over the past several years, student activists throughout the U.S. have been working with the Conflict-Free Campus Initiative, a student-led initiative that is active on 150 campuses across the country and abroad, to pass resolutions through campus administrations. Resolutions have been passed on 16 campuses, including Duke and Stanford, and in state-wide legislation in California and Maryland. Madison joins other cities such as Pittsburgh, PA, St. Petersburg, FL, and Edina, MN who have passed similar resolutions.

The Enough Project’s Raise Hope for Congo campaign, an initiative of the anti-genocide group in Washington, commended the city’s leadership.

Raise Hope for Congo Campaign Manager JD Stier said:

"Wisconsin is home to U.S. Special Envoy to the Great Lakes region, Russ Feingold as well as Congo activist Aaron Rodgers, placing Madison at the forefront of the human rights movement for peace in Congo. By leading the call to go conflict-free, Madison can inspire other cities across the nation to join the conflict-free movement."

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The Enough Project is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on the crises in Sudan, South Sudan, eastern Congo, and areas affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough conducts intensive field research, develops practical policies to address these crises, and shares sensible tools to empower citizens and groups working for change. To learn more about Enough, go to www.enoughproject.org.

Central Africa: Access to Remote Areas Needed to Eliminate The LRA Rebel Group

Date: 
Nov 20, 2013

Enough Project Press Release

Contact: Carine Umuhumuza, cumuhumuza@enoughproject.org202-478-5314

Central Africa: Access to Remote Areas Needed to Eliminate The LRA Rebel Group

Washington, D.C. --- Today, as the U.N. Security Council meets to discuss the status of the counter-Lord’s Resistance Army, or LRA, mission, the Enough Project released a new report, highlighting gaps in the fight to eliminate the LRA. The report, “Blind Spots: Gaining Access to Where the LRA Operates”, based on field research across central Africa, emphasizes a major obstacle in eliminating the rebel group: the lack of access to remote areas in central Africa where the LRA is known to be hiding and operating.

The counter-LRA mission, led by Ugandan forces and backed by the U.S.-supported African Union Regional Task Force, or AU-RTF, has made significant progress in the past two years, including increased defections from the rebel group, a decrease of more than 50 percent in attacks, and significant improvement for human security and protection of civilians. 

“Gaining Access” argues that despite the AU-RTF’s progress in eliminating some of the LRA’s safe havens, including longtime strongholds in Garamba National Park in the Democratic Republic of Congo, or DRC, LRA history reveals that the group can survive in a shrunken state and expand rapidly when circumstances and external support allow, a factor that can significantly curb the momentum of the mission, unless the senior leadership of LRA is removed and the group completely dismantled. The rebels are down to only 250-300 fighters, but are responsible for the displacement of more than 350,000 civilians. The LRA have found safe havens in remote areas of northeastern DRC, the eastern parts of Central African Republic and in the Sudan controlled Kafia Kingi enclave---where logistical and political blocks have denied the AU-RTF access to pursue the LRA.

Kasper Agger, author of the report, states:

“The endgame of removing LRA leader Joseph Kony from the battlefield and neutralizing the LRA is imperiled by the lack of access to wide swathes of central Africa where the group still hides. Expanded regional cooperation and increased logistical support for the mission are critical to boosting ongoing counter-LRA efforts and bringing a final end to the LRA rebel group.”

Currently, the largest hindrances to access are the lack of cooperation among regional governments and uncoordinated international support for the AU-RTF. Counter-LRA efforts are also undermined by the lack of full cross-border coordination, information sharing among regional forces, and limited logistical capabilities to cover large areas where the LRA reside. The report calls on international stakeholders, the United Nations, the African Union and the U.S. to use diplomatic leverage to forge an agreement between the leaders of the Sudans, Uganda, the DRC and the Central African Republic to ensure access for AU-RTF troops to all areas where the LRA operate  and general support for counter-LRA efforts within their territories. The international community can also play a key role in ensuring a fully operational AU-RTF, equipped with sufficient communications assets and increased logistical capacity.

Consolidating and increasing the support for the mission will not only boost the decades-long effort to eliminate the LRA, but could also serve as a model for how to secure the long-term security of remote border areas in Africa.

Read the full report, “Blind Spots: Gaining Access to Areas Where the LRA Operates”: http://www.enoughproject.org/files/BlindSpots-GainingAccesstoWhereLRAOperates.pdf

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