Press Releases

The Darfur Peace Process: Recipe for a Bad Deal?

Date: 
Apr 6, 2010

 

Enough Project & Center for American Progress

For Immediate Release
April 6, 2010

Contact
Jonathan Hutson, 202-386-1618
jhutson@enoughproject.org

REPORT: The Darfur Peace Process: Recipe for a Bad Deal?

Read the report.

WASHINGTON, D.C. Even as violence continues in the Jebel Marra area of Darfur, negotiators in the Qatari city of Doha are attempting to hammer out a peace deal for this western region of Sudan. While some observers have hailed these talks between rebel forces and the Government of Sudan as a major breakthrough, there are numerous reasons why enthusiasm should be tempered argues ‘The Darfur Peace Process: Recipe for a Bad Deal?,’ a short report from the Enough Project at the Center for American Progress.

Enough’s report on the Doha peace process builds upon an update that Enough released at the start of negotiations. Close monitoring of the highly fluid Doha peace process over the past month reveals a dramatic disconnect between the deal brokering in Qatar and the reality of violence on the ground in Darfur. Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir’s declaration that “the war in Darfur” is over cannot be taken at face value.

There is tangible evidence -- including the fact that the army is pursuing an offensive in Jebel Marra --that Sudan’s ruling National Congress Party, or NCP, continues to negotiate in bad faith, the strategy paper notes. The Government of Sudan has a strong interest in appearing conciliatory, not least because it hopes to legitimize itself in time for the elections now just days away, but its actions on the ground have worsened in recent weeks. Furthermore, tensions within and among rebel groups, fragile and shifting alliances, and a lack of transparency have characterized the Doha negotiations to date.

“The Doha process is hampered by backroom deals that put the Sudanese government in a strong, omniscient position while rebel groups jockey for temporary advantages, with little consideration for how their lack of unity leaves them collectively susceptible to government manipulation,” says Enough Project Advisor Omer Ismail, who travels regularly to the region. “With so many players clamoring for short-term gains without comprehensive knowledge or long-term outlooks, I fear we will see a replay of the 2006 Abuja talks’ failure.”

“There is much in the recent talks to suggest they are not built for success,” says John Norris, the Enough Project’s Executive Director. “The current Doha process replicates many of the exact same mistakes of earlier failed agreements at a time when the international community, frankly, should know better.”

Read ‘The Darfur Peace Process: Recipe for a Bad Deal?’.

####

For additional information:

VISIT the Enough Project's blog, Enough Said, for updates on this issue.
FOLLOW the Enough Project on Twitter, http://twitter.com/enoughproject.

The Center for American Progress is a nonpartisan research and educational institute dedicated to promoting a strong, just and free America that ensures opportunity for all. We believe that Americans are bound together by a common commitment to these values and we aspire to ensure that our national policies reflect these values. Enough is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on crises in Sudan, Chad, eastern Congo, northern Uganda, Somalia, and Zimbabwe. Enough’s strategy papers and briefings provide sharp field analysis and targeted policy recommendations based on a “3P” crisis response strategy: promoting durable peace, providing civilian protection, and punishing perpetrators of atrocities. Enough works with concerned citizens, advocates, and policy makers to prevent, mitigate, and resolve these crises. For more information, contact Jonathan Hutson, jhutson [AT] enoughproject.org, 202-386-1618.

If you would rather not receive future email messages from Center for American Progress, let us know by clicking here. Center for American Progress, 1333 H St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005-4707 United States.

As election crisis unfolds, Darfuris and U.S. advocates call on Congress to exercise more oversight over faltering Sudan policy

Date: 
Apr 1, 2010
Author: 
Jonathan Hutson

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contacts:
Susan Morgan, Investors Against Genocide, 617-797-0451 susan@paxcommunications.org
Jonathan Hutson, the Enough Project, 202-386-1618, jhutson@enoughproject.org
Mame Annan-Brown, Genocide Intervention Network, 202-559-7409, annan-brown@genocideintervention.net

 

WASHINGTON, D.C. – As Sudan’s national election descends into crisis amid growing opposition boycotts, U.S.-based Darfuris and policy experts from Sudan Now, a campaign led by a group of prominent anti-genocide and human rights organizations, are calling for Congress to step up its oversight of the current U.S. Sudan policy. The group is launching a social media campaign today to encourage leading members of Congress to privately and publicly engage with the Obama administration on Sudan.

“At this critical moment for Sudan, Congress should hold the administration responsible for faithful implementation of the Sudan policy released last October,” states Sam Bell, Executive Director of the Genocide Intervention Network.

According to the Sudan Now campaign, the current implementation of U.S. Sudan policy has not addressed a number of extremely concerning developments on the ground including Sudanese government attacks on Jebel Marra that have killed hundreds and displaced thousands in recent weeks, ongoing obstruction by the national government in access for aid workers and UN investigators to Darfur, and clear indications that the nationwide elections scheduled for April will be neither free nor fair.

“There have been any number of disturbing developments on the ground in Sudan, yet the reaction from the administration has been remarkably muted,” states John Norris, Executive Director of the Enough Project at the Center for American Progress. “A wide range of a Sudanese and international experts have clearly determined that the national election scheduled for this month will be neither free nor fair, and recent government attacks in Darfur have driven tens of thousands of innocent civilians from their homes. Yet, senior administration officials appear badly divided on their approach to Sudan at a time when coherent international leadership toward Sudan is more vital than ever.”

The Obama administration’s Sudan policy, announced in October 2009, clearly stated that tough benchmarks would be applied to Sudan, and that a committee of deputies from various cabinet agencies would assess progress “based on verifiable changes in conditions on the ground.” However, neither the administration nor the deputies’ review process have addressed the many concerning developments on the ground. These developments also include ongoing violence and clashes in South Sudan that have claimed more than 2,000 lives in the last year and driven a quarter-million people from their homes, ongoing violations of a U.N. arms embargo on Darfur by both the Government of Sudan and rebel groups, and the resistance of the Government of Sudan to cooperate in any form with the International Criminal Court investigating war crimes, crimes against humanity, and genocide in Sudan.

“It is time for the United States Government to support, encourage, and assist the ICC in moving forward on its indictment of Omar Bashir to afford both accuser and accused their rightful day in court, “states Abdelgabar Adam, President of Darfur Human Rights Organization. “Justice needs to be served through open to public scrutiny on the issues of whether human rights violations were committed by Mr. Bashir.”

“The people of Darfur want nothing more than to lead a normal life,” states Mohamed Suleiman, a Darfuri and the President of the San Francisco Bay Area Darfur Coalition. “They’d like to see their children grow up in a secure and peaceful Darfur. The international community, for eight consecutive years, has failed to make that possible. In fact, as each year has passed, Darfuris have come to realize that the international community caters to the need of the brutal regime in Khartoum rather than working in earnest to see a lasting peace in Darfur with security and justice for the people of Darfur.”

####

Sudan Now is a campaign led by a group of prominent anti-genocide and human rights advocacy organizations committed to bringing meaningful and lasting peace to Sudan and encouraging strong American leadership and action to achieve this goal. The campaign challenges President Barack Obama and top U.S. administration officials to live up to their promises to take strong and immediate action to help end the international crisis in Sudan and bring a lasting peace to the people of that country. Organizations participating in the campaign include Humanity United, the Enough Project at the Center for American Progress, Genocide Intervention Network, Stop Genocide Now, and Investors Against Genocide.

Deal Making in Sudan

Date: 
Mar 31, 2010

 

Enough Project & Center for American Progress

MEDIA CONTACTS: 
Jonathan Hutson, 202-386-1618
jhutson@enoughproject.org

REPORT RELEASE: Deal Making in Sudan

 

Read the report: http://www.enoughproject.org/publications/deal-making-sudan

JUBA, SUDAN/ WASHINGTON, D.C. The Enough Project at the Center for American Progress today released the following statement:

A series of deals in February 2010 over elements of Sudan’s Comprehensive Peace Agreement, or CPA, largely went under the radar of international media attention, but offers important insights into the current dynamics of deal making that may trigger a return to North-South war. The Obama administration should heed the lessons from these deals and encourage coordinated international action, argues “Deal Making in Sudan,” a new report from the Enough Project at the Center for American Progress.

“The motivations and means by which Khartoum and Juba negotiate the most contentious political issues in Sudan will ultimately determine whether the South’s self-determination referendum proceeds peacefully or plunges the country back into war,” argues the report by Maggie Fick, Enough's South Sudan field researcher. “The strategy (or lack thereof) behind the international community’s involvement in these negotiations will also have an enduring impact on security throughout the Horn of Africa.”

Without a coordinated international effort aimed at ensuring the timeliness of negotiations, one or both of the parties could use a delay in discussions to their advantage next year. The fact that the positions of the international community toward Sudan remain poorly coordinated and designed at this late hour could well spell trouble ahead.

“More and more of the negotiations between North and South appear to be taking place without effective international support or guidance," notes John Norris, Executive Director of the Enough Project. "While that may produce some deals in the short-term, that approach is unlikely to resolve the big-ticket issues that could spark a return to war such as how to split oil revenues or how to divide contested border areas. Enormous amounts of work remain to be done.”

Read the report: http://www.enoughproject.org/publications/deal-making-sudan

###

 

Enough is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on crises in Sudan, eastern Congo, and areas of Africa affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough’s strategy papers and briefings provide sharp field analysis and targeted policy recommendations based on a “3P” crisis response strategy: promoting durable peace, providing civilian protection, and punishing perpetrators of atrocities. Enough works with concerned citizens, advocates, and policy makers to prevent, mitigate, and resolve these crises. For more information, please visit www.enoughproject.org.

Tracy McGrady’s Darfur Dream Team Raises $600,000 for Twelve Schools Serving Refugee Children

Date: 
Mar 24, 2010

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
 

Contact: Jonathan Hutson, 202-386-1618, jhutson@enoughproject.org

 


RELEASE: Tracy McGrady’s Darfur Dream Team Raises $600,000 for Twelve Schools Serving Refugee Children
 

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Launched in March 2009, the Darfur Dream Team’s Sister Schools Program, co-founded by NBA star Tracy McGrady and John Prendergast of the Enough Project, has raised more than $300,000 to support six schools in Djabal refugee camp in eastern Chad. The Darfur Dream Team has also received additional financial pledges totaling $300,000 for six schools in a second camp. The funds and pledges received by McGrady and the Darfur Dream Team will provide 22,000 children in the twelve Darfuri refugee camp schools with access to quality education.

 

McGrady was inspired to travel to the camps in 2007 with Prendergast after speaking about the crisis with NBA legend Dikembe Mutumbo. Upon their return, McGrady and Prendergast co-founded the Darfur Dream Team’s Sister Schools Program.

 

“After spending time with children in the refugee camps, I was humbled and compelled to share their stories with the world,” said McGrady of the New York Knicks. “I wanted to do something different in order to help them. That is why we created the Darfur Dream Team.”

 

Since the Darfur crisis began, nearly 3 million people have been displaced by the conflict. More than 250,000 Darfuris have become refugees in neighboring Chad. Children make up more than 60 percent of the population in the Darfuri refugee camps. They face major educational challenges, including a shortage of qualified teachers, poorly built school buildings, and lack of supplies. The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, or UNHCR, will use the Darfur Dream Team’s generous donation to begin building and rehabilitating schools serving Darfuri children living in the refugee camps.

 

The Darfur Dream Team is a dynamic partnership of organizations and professional basketball players that aims to provide Darfuri refugee youth with access to education and to connect these students with their American peers through video-blogging and letter exchanges. This innovative program aims to empower Darfuri youth as community leaders and create a lasting peace across the region.

 

To date, over 350 U.S. middle schools, high schools, colleges and universities in 26 states have signed up for the program. U.S. sister schools are raising awareness and funds to support the education of their Darfuri peers.

 

“American students participating in the program are making an impact on the lives of Darfuri children, and also taking the opportunity to develop life-long bonds with their Darfuri peers,” said Prendergast, co-founder of the Darfur Dream Team.

 

McGrady continues to reach out to professional basketball players to make the crisis in Darfur a priority. Baron Davis, Derek Fisher, Luol Deng, Etan Thomas, and Jermaine O’ Neal have joined him as Darfur Dream Team co-captains. Together, they plan to launch in-arena activities with their respective NBA teams to support the initiative.  In addition to the NBA players, principal partner organizations in the Darfur Dream Team include: USA for UNHCR, the Enough Project, Participant Media, the Education Partnership for Children of Conflict, Facing History and Ourselves, and i-ACT.

###

The Darfur Dream Team’s Sister Schools Program links American middle schools, high schools, and universities with schools in the Darfuri refugee camps in eastern Chad.  U.S sister schools will raise funds to improve the education of their Darfuri peers through the construction and rehabilitation of school buildings and by providing supplies, sports equipment, and teacher training. The program will also foster cross-cultural relationships and mutual understanding between U.S. and Darfuri refugee students through letter exchanges and video blogging. The Sister Schools Program is a dynamic partnership involving professional basketball stars Tracy McGrady, Derek Fisher, Baron Davis, Luol Deng,  Etan Thomas, and Jermaine O'Neal; United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR);USA for UNHCR,  the Enough Project; Participant Media; TakePart.com;  Education Partnership for Children in Conflict, co-founded by Angelina Jolie and Gene Sperling; Facing History and Ourselves; and i-ACT. The partnership will expand to include additional professional basketball players. More than 100 U.S. schools have signed up to participate in the program.

The Center for American Progress is a nonpartisan research and educational institute dedicated to promoting a strong, just and free America that ensures opportunity for all. We believe that Americans are bound together by a common commitment to these values and we aspire to ensure that our national policies reflect these values. Enough is a project of the Center for American Progress to end crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on crises in Sudan, Chad, eastern Congo, northern Uganda, Somalia, and Zimbabwe. Enough’s strategy papers and briefings provide sharp field analysis and targeted policy recommendations based on a “3P” crisis response strategy: promoting durable peace, providing civilian protection, and punishing perpetrators of atrocities. Enough works with concerned citizens, advocates, and policy makers to prevent, mitigate, and resolve these crises. To learn more about Enough and what you can do to help, go to www.enoughproject.org.

                      
                                      

Center for American Progress Logo

Statement: CBS's "60 Minutes" segment, "Congo's Gold" wins Media for Liberty Award

Date: 
Mar 19, 2010

 

For Immediate Release
March 19, 2010

Contact: 
Jonathan Hutson, 202-386-1618
jhutson@enoughproject.org
 

 

 
STATEMENT: CBS's "60 Minutes" segment, "Congo's Gold" wins Media for Liberty Award

WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Enough Project at the Center for American Progress congratulates CBS's "60 Minutes" correspondent Scott Pelley, producers Solly Granatstein and Nicole Young and editor Tom Honeysett for winning the first annual Media for Liberty Award for their November 2009 piece, "Congo's Gold." The March 18 awards ceremony at the Newseum in Washington, D.C. featured a panel with Scott Pelley and Enough Project co-founder John Prendergast, moderated by best-selling author and leading political satirist P.J. O'Rourke.

In the "Congo's Gold" episode, Scott Pelley travels with John Prendergast of Enough and Anneke Van Woudenberg of Human Rights Watch to the Democratic Republic of the Congo to document the link between the conflict minerals we use in our jewelry and electronic devices and the mass atrocities that have caused the deaths of five million people.

This prestigious award acknowledges and encourages media contributions that explore the relationship between economic and political liberty. The Enough Project also applauds the stellar efforts of the rest of the "60 Minutes" team involved in the production: associate producer Rachael Kun, executive producer Jeff Fager, executive editor Bill Owens and the camera crew of Chris Everson, Ian Robbie and Anton van der Merwe. 

###

The Center for American Progress is a nonpartisan research and educational institute dedicated to promoting a strong, just and free America that ensures opportunity for all. We believe that Americans are bound together by a common commitment to these values and we aspire to ensure that our national policies reflect these values. Enough is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on crises in Sudan, Congo, and the areas of Africa affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough’s strategy papers and briefings provide sharp field analysis and targeted policy recommendations based on a “3P” crisis response strategy: promoting durable peace, providing civilian protection, and punishing perpetrators of atrocities. Enough works with concerned citizens, advocates, and policy makers to prevent, mitigate, and resolve these crises. For more information, contact Jonathan Hutson, 202-386-1618; jhutson@enoughproject.org.

 

Preparing For Two Sudans

Date: 
Mar 16, 2010

 

Enough Project & Center for American Progress

MEDIA CONTACTS: 
Jonathan Hutson, 202-386-1618
jhutson@enoughproject.org

REPORT RELEASE: Preparing for Two Sudans

 

Read the report: http://www.enoughproject.org/publications/two-sudans

JUBA, SUDAN/ WASHINGTON, D.C. The Enough Project at the Center for American Progress today released the following statement:

All signs indicate that Sudan, Africa’s largest state, will very soon split in two – either peacefully or violently. The Obama administration must do its utmost to prevent a return to full-scale war in Sudan, argues a new report from the Enough Project at the Center for American Progress.

In a self-determination referendum scheduled for January 2011, the people of southern Sudan are widely expected to vote for separation from their northern neighbors. Yet with the security situation in southern Sudan still highly volatile, next month’s national election is set to be deeply flawed, and several crucial elements of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement, or CPA, still unimplemented, the referendum and its outcome are by no means guaranteed.

As a guarantor of the CPA, the United States must work multilaterally on several fronts to support the peaceful expression of the will of the people of southern Sudan and prevent a return to conflict, argues the report by Maggie Fick, Enough's Juba, Sudan-based policy researcher.

 

 

"The Sudanese parties must complete many difficult tasks to prepare for the 2011 referendum and its outcome,” says Fick. “The international community’s role is to reduce the likelihood that the upcoming negotiations occur in an environment so politically charged that consensus between the parties becomes impossible.”

 

The Obama administration must put meaningful pressure on Sudan's two largest political parties —the National Congress Party, or NCP, and the Sudan Peoples’ Liberation Army/Movement, or SPLA/M— to find common ground on the CPA and the contentious issues that will accompany an independent southern Sudan. This approach is consistent with the Sudan policy unveiled by the Obama administration in October 2009 – although that policy has been implemented very unevenly to date.

John Norris, Executive Director of the Enough Project notes, “There does not seem to be a clear road map for Sudan policy among key international actors as Sudan approaches a vital end game with regard to southern independence. That lack of well-orchestrated international diplomacy is a real liability, and will only make it more likely that small provocations on the ground can set off a much larger fire in the months ahead.”

Read the report: http://www.enoughproject.org/publications/two-sudans

###

 

Enough is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on crises in Sudan, eastern Congo, and areas of Africa affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough’s strategy papers and briefings provide sharp field analysis and targeted policy recommendations based on a “3P” crisis response strategy: promoting durable peace, providing civilian protection, and punishing perpetrators of atrocities. Enough works with concerned citizens, advocates, and policy makers to prevent, mitigate, and resolve these crises. For more information, please visit www.enoughproject.org.

Lord’s Resistance Army Finds Safe Haven in Darfur

Date: 
Mar 11, 2010

 MEDIA CONTACTS: ?

Eileen White Read, 202.641.0779?
eread@enoughproject.org

 

STATEMENT: Lord’s Resistance Army Finds Safe Haven in Darfur

KAMPALA, UGANDA/ JUBA, SUDAN/ WASHINGTON, D.C. – The Enough Project at the Center for American Progress today released the following statement:

The Enough Project confirms that a contingent of the deadly Lord’s Resistance Army, or LRA, has taken refuge in areas of south Darfur, Sudan, controlled by the Government of Sudan. The possibility of rekindled collaboration between LRA leader Joseph Kony and Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir—both wanted for war crimes and crimes against humanity by the International Criminal Court, or ICC—should alarm policymakers and demands urgent international investigation and response.

The LRA originated in northern Uganda during the late 1980s. In addition to committing widespread atrocities in Uganda, throughout the 1990s and early 2000s the LRAserved as a proxy for the Sudanese government in its war with the Sudan People’s Liberation Army, or SPLA, in southern Sudan. In 2005, Kony publicly stated that the Bashir government supported the LRA as a proxy force to destabilize the south, a charge that Khartoum continues to deny despite considerable evidence to the contrary.

"The Khartoum regime's principal tool of war during its 21-year reign has been support for marauding militias such as the Janjaweed, the Murahaliin, and the Lord's Resistance Army,” said Enough Co-founder John Prendergast. “Facing no consequences for this destructive method of governing, it is unsurprising that the regime is again providing safe haven for the LRA. Absent a cost for this, we will likely see the LRA unleashed again later this year to destabilize the referendum in southern Sudan."

With material support from Khartoum, the LRA quickly became one of the deadliest militias in Africa, known for gruesome mutilations of civilians and abduction of children to serve as fighters and sex slaves. Following failed peace talks from 2006 to 2008, the LRA morphed into a full blown regional insurgency with fighters in northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, the Central African Republic, or CAR, and southern Sudan.

In late 2009, Enough received credible information that an LRA reconnaissance team was seeking to make contact with the Sudanese army at their base in Kafia Kingi, near south Darfur’s border with CAR. In recent months, Ugandan forces have pursued the LRA into Congo, CAR, and southern Sudan, but are restricted from crossing Sudan’s disputed north-south border. 

Now, based on months of field research and interviews with government and United Nations officials in several countries, Enough can confirm that LRA units have reached south Darfur.

“This is a very disturbing development. The move by the Government of Sudan to provide the LRA with safe haven demands a firm, rapid, and well-coordinated response from the United States and its partners in the international community,” said John Norris, Enough’s Executive Director. “A failure to bring clear and consistent pressure on President Bashir and his allies for this latest outrage will only encourage the Sudanese government to commit further abuses, with a terrible cost for civilians on the ground.”

Also today, Enough released a strategy paper by field researcher Ledio Cakaj detailing the continuing threat posed by the LRA to civilians in northeastern Congo. The report, “Between a Rock and a Hard Place: LRA Attacks and Congolese Army Abuses in Northeastern Congo,” argues that much greater efforts must be made to protect civilians from a resurgent LRA and the predatory Congolese army.

 

Read the report on http://www.enoughproject.org/publications/lra-army-abuses-congo

###

 

Enough is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on crises in Sudan, eastern Congo, and areas of Africa affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough’s strategy papers and briefings provide sharp field analysis and targeted policy recommendations based on a “3P” crisis response strategy: promoting durable peace, providing civilian protection, and punishing perpetrators of atrocities. Enough works with concerned citizens, advocates, and policy makers to prevent, mitigate, and resolve these crises. For more information, please visit www.enoughproject.org

 

STATEMENT: Lord’s Resistance Army Finds Safe Haven in Darfur

Date: 
Mar 10, 2010

 

MEDIA CONTACTS: 
Eileen White Read, 202.641.0779
eread@enoughproject.org
 

 

 
STATEMENT: Lord’s Resistance Army Finds Safe Haven in Darfur
KAMPALA, UGANDA/ JUBA, SUDAN/ WASHINGTON, D.C. – The Enough Project at the Center for American Progress today released the following statement:
 
The Enough Project confirms that a contingent of the deadly Lord’s Resistance Army, or LRA, has taken refuge in areas of south Darfur, Sudan, controlled by the Government of Sudan. The possibility of rekindled collaboration between LRA leader Joseph Kony and Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir—both wanted for war crimes and crimes against humanity by the International Criminal Court, or ICC—should alarm policymakers and demands urgent international investigation and response.
 
The LRA originated in northern Uganda during the late 1980s. In addition to committing widespread atrocities in Uganda, throughout the 1990s and early 2000s the LRA served as a proxy for the Sudanese government in its war with the Sudan People’s Liberation Army, or SPLA, in southern Sudan. In 2005, Kony publicly stated that the Bashir government supported the LRA as a proxy force to destabilize the south, a charge that Khartoum continues to deny despite considerable evidence to the contrary.
 
"The Khartoum regime's principal tool of war during its 21-year reign has been support for marauding militias such as the Janjaweed, the Murahaliin, and the Lord's Resistance Army,” said Enough Co-founder John Prendergast. “Facing no consequences for this destructive method of governing, it is unsurprising that the regime is again providing safe haven for the LRA. Absent a cost for this, we will likely see the LRA unleashed again later this year to destabilize the referendum in southern Sudan."
 
With material support from Khartoum, the LRA quickly became one of the deadliest militias in Africa, known for gruesome mutilations of civilians and abduction of children to serve as fighters and sex slaves. Following failed peace talks from 2006 to 2008, the LRA morphed into a full blown regional insurgency with fighters in northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, the Central African Republic, or CAR, and southern Sudan.
 
In late 2009, Enough received credible information that an LRA reconnaissance team was seeking to make contact with the Sudanese army at their base in Kafia Kingi, near south Darfur’s border with CAR. In recent months, Ugandan forces have pursued the LRA into Congo, CAR, and southern Sudan, but are restricted from crossing Sudan’s disputed north-south border. 
 
Now, based on months of field research and interviews with government and United Nations officials in several countries, Enough can confirm that LRA units have reached south Darfur.
 
“This is a very disturbing development. The move by the Government of Sudan to provide the LRA with safe haven demands a firm, rapid, and well-coordinated response from the United States and its partners in the international community,” said John Norris, Enough’s Executive Director. “A failure to bring clear and consistent pressure on President Bashir and his allies for this latest outrage will only encourage the Sudanese government to commit further abuses, with a terrible cost for civilians on the ground.”
                 
Also today, Enough released a strategy paper by field researcher Ledio Cakaj detailing the continuing threat posed by theLRA to civilians in northeastern Congo. The report, “Between a Rock and a Hard Place: LRA Attacks and Congolese Army Abuses in Northeastern Congo,” argues that much greater efforts must be made to protect civilians from a resurgent LRAand the predatory Congolese army.
 
Read the report on www.enoughproject.org.
 
###
 

Enough is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on crises in Sudan, eastern Congo, and areas of Africa affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough’s strategy papers and briefings provide sharp field analysis and targeted policy recommendations based on a “3P” crisis response strategy: promoting durable peace, providing civilian protection, and punishing perpetrators of atrocities. Enough works with concerned citizens, advocates, and policy makers to prevent, mitigate, and resolve these crises. For more information, please visit www.enoughproject.org

 

 

SUDAN REPORT: A Peace Process Play-by-Play

Date: 
Feb 25, 2010

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
February 25, 2010

MEDIA CONTACT: 
Eileen White Read, 202.641.0779
eread@enoughproject.org
 

SUDAN REPORT: A Peace Process Play-by-Play
 
READ the report.
 
WASHINGTON, D.C. – The Enough Project at the Center for American Progress today released a new report, “A Peace Process Play-by-Play,” highlighting the risks and potential rewards of the preliminary peace agreement reached between the government of Sudan and the rebel group Justice and Equality Movement (JEM). The report gives particular consideration to the strategic concerns of key players to the talks.
 
John Norris, Executive Director of the Enough Project, noted, “Everyone wants to see these peace talks succeed, but the list of failed agreements in Sudan is long, so enthusiasm must be tempered with realism. It is essential that any deal include practical arrangements to monitor the implementation of these agreements and take appropriate actions when violations occur. It is also vital that agreements reflect the input and interests of Darfuri civil society, not just the views of military commanders. Whether the tactical interests of those at the negotiations can be converted into a viable and comprehensive peace for Darfur remains an open question at this hour.”
 
John Prendergast, Co-founder of the Enough Project, commented, "The emerging process is driven by President Bashir's quest for legitimacy through the upcoming elections, by the end of support from Chad to Darfur's rebels, and by a desire to end the divisions among the Islamists in northern Sudan as they prepare for the possible independence of the South. These motivations do not ensure long-term peace, but rather threaten to undermine the needs of the Darfuri displaced and to increase the prospects for a return to North-South war as Darfur is temporarily muzzled."
 
READ the report.
 
###
 

Enough is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on crises in Sudan, eastern Congo, Somalia, and areas affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough’s strategy papers and briefings provide sharp field analysis and targeted policy recommendations based on a “3P” crisis response strategy: promoting durable peace, providing civilian protection, and punishing perpetrators of atrocities. Enough works with concerned citizens, advocates, and policy makers to prevent, mitigate, and resolve these crises. For more information, please visit www.enoughproject.org.

 

STATEMENTS: Reaction to International Criminal Court Decision on Genocide and Bashir

Date: 
Feb 3, 2010

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 
 
MEDIA CONTACTS:
Eileen White Read, 202.641.0779
 
Mame Annan-Brown, 202.559.7409
annan-brown@genocideintervention.net


STATEMENTS: Reaction to International Criminal Court Decision on Genocide and Bashir

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The Enough Project and the Genocide Intervention Network today released a statement concerning the decision by the International Criminal Court, or ICC, which re-opens the possibility of Genocide charges against Sudan’s President Bashir.

Sam Bell, Executive Director of the Genocide Intervention Network commented, “Today's decision is technical and addresses a narrow, but potentially far-reaching, question about the threshold the prosecutor is required to meet in bringing genocide charges. No matter what ultimately comes of the genocide charge as it works it way back through the pre-trial chamber, President Bashir is already wanted for multiple counts of war crimes and crimes against humanity. In the interests of peace and justice, he should be apprehended and tried."
 
John Norris, Executive Director of the Enough Project at the Center  for American Progress, noted “The finding of the Appeal Chamber is sound, and makes it far more likely that President Bashir will eventually face a warrant for genocide in addition to the existing warrants for war crimes and crimes against humanity. As much as Bashir, his partners in the regime and some international diplomats would like the issue of genocide to go quietly away, today’s ruling is again a powerful reminder that we will not achieve lasting peace in Sudan without justice and accountability. We also hope that this well-reasoned ruling helps build additional support within the Obama Administration for resigning the Rome Statute.”
 
###
 
Enough is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on crises in Sudan, eastern Congo, and areas of Africa affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough’s strategy papers and briefings provide sharp field analysis and targeted policy recommendations based on a “3P” crisis response strategy: promoting durable peace, providing civilian protection, and punishing perpetrators of atrocities. Enough works with concerned citizens, advocates, and policy makers to prevent, mitigate, and resolve these crises. For more information, please visit www.enoughproject.org.
 
About Genocide Intervention Network – Genocide Intervention Network empowers individuals and communities with the tools to prevent and stop genocide. Currently focused on conflicts in Sudan, Burma and Democratic Republic of Congo, among other areas of concern, Genocide Intervention Network envisions a world in which the global community is willing and able to protect civilians from genocide and mass atrocities.  The organization is building a permanent anti-genocide constituency, mobilizing the political will to prevent and stop genocide. For more information, please visit www.genocideintervention.net

 

Syndicate content