Press Releases

STRATEGY PAPER: Obama Administration Needs To Hold Sudan Accountable To Clear Benchmarks

Date: 
Jan 19, 2010
Enough Project  Humanity United  Human Rights Watch  Save Darfur
 Genocide InterventionPhysicians for Human RightsAmerican Jewish World Servicei-ActInvestors Against Genocide

For Immediate Release
January 19, 2010

Media Contacts
Eileen White Read, 202.641.0779
eread@enoughproject.org
Mike Boyer, 650.587.2030
mboyer@humanityunited.org
Joshua Berkman, 202.792.2893
ischwab@ajws.org
Mame Annan-Brown, 202.558.7409
annan-brown@genocideintervention.net
Georgette Gagnon, 212.216.1223
gagnong@hrw.org
Gabriel Stauring, 310.415.2863
gabriel@stopgenocidenow.org
Susan Morgan, 617.797.0451
susan@paxcommunications.org
Ben Greenberg, 617.301.4200
bgreenberg@phrusa.org
Emily Diamond-Falk, 202.525.8153
emily@savedarfur.org
 
STRATEGY PAPER: Obama Administration Needs To Hold Sudan Accountable To Clear Benchmarks

Read the strategy paper. 

 

WASHINGTON, D.C. – In its Sudan policy review completed in mid-October 2009, the Obama administration indicated it would regularly assess the progress of peace in Sudan—or lack thereof. However, the administration has not publicly disclosed precisely what benchmarks it is applying to assess progress in Sudan, even as it begins its official review process this month and as tensions increase with the coming April national elections, and with the January 2011 referendum on independence for Southern Sudan rapidly approaching.
 
To help bring transparency to the process by which United States ensures strict adherence to unambiguous benchmarks, and apply the appropriate pressures and incentives accordingly, a coalition of nine Sudan advocacy groups has today released a strategy paper aiming to provide these benchmarks for the administration - guidance for how officials, concerned citizens, and others in the international community can assess genuine progress toward a lasting peace in Sudan.
 
The nine-member coalition includes the Enough Project at the Center for American Progress, Humanity United, American Jewish World Service, Genocide Intervention Network, Human Rights Watch, iACT/Stop Genocide Now, Investors Against Genocide, Physicians for Human Rights, and the Save Darfur Coalition.
 
The benchmarks are designed to hold the Obama administration to its promise to set and enforce clear and pre-determined benchmarks of progress for the government of Sudan. The relative progress toward or away from these benchmarks would then determine the pressures and incentives—so-called “carrots” and “sticks”—that would be brought to bear in 2010, a moment the Obama Administration itself said, “can either lead to steady improvements in the lives of the Sudanese people or degenerate into even more violent conflict and state failure.”
 
“This is an important moment for the Deputies who are charged with leading the administration review to take a hard look at the real facts on the ground in Sudan,” said John Norris, Executive Director of the Enough Project. “There are many worrying indicators that suggest a much broader conflict could break out in Sudan over the course of the next year, and U.S. policy needs to be directed with great urgency toward preventing that from happening." 
 
“We are at the beginning of a critical year for the future of Sudan,” noted Jerry Fowler, President of the Save Darfur Coalition. “It is of the utmost importance that the administration evaluates progress in Sudan based on the facts on the ground; facts which are stark.  2.7 million internally displaced persons in Darfur; over 4 million dependent on humanitarian aid; increasing violence and instability in South Sudan; and April elections which will take place in an environment of fear and intimidation. These facts underscore the urgency with which the administration must quickly conclude that the status quo remains unacceptable and that increased high-level engagement to build an international coalition for peace in Sudan is necessary.”
 
READ the strategy paper
###
 
Enough is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on crises in Sudan, eastern Congo, northern Uganda, and Somalia. Enough’s strategy papers and briefings provide sharp field analysis and targeted policy recommendations based on a “3P” crisis response strategy: promoting durable peace, providing civilian protection, and punishing perpetrators of atrocities. Enough works with concerned citizens, advocates, and policy makers to prevent, mitigate, and resolve these crises. For more information, please visit www.enoughproject.org.
 
Humanity United is a philanthropic organization committed to building a world where mass atrocities and modern-day slavery are no longer possible. By helping to build permanent constituencies to end atrocities and slavery, supporting efforts that empower affected communities, and addressing the root causes of conflict and injustice, Humanity United seeks to help restore human dignity in places where it has been lost and to help create a lasting global peace. To learn more, visit http://www.HumanityUnited.org.
 
American Jewish World Service (AJWS) is an international development organization motivated by Judaism's imperative to pursue justice. AJWS is dedicated to alleviating poverty, hunger and disease among the people of the developing world regardless of race, religion or nationality. Through grants to grassroots organizations, volunteer service, advocacy and education, AJWS fosters civil society, sustainable development and human rights for all people, while promoting the values and responsibilities of global citizenship within the Jewish community. Visit www.ajws.org.
 
Genocide Intervention Network empowers individuals and communities with the tools to prevent and stop genocide. Currently focused on conflicts in Sudan, Burma and Democratic Republic of Congo, among other areas of concern, Genocide Intervention Network envisions a world in which the global community is willing and able to protect civilians from genocide and mass atrocities.  The organization is building a permanent anti-genocide constituency, mobilizing the political will to prevent and stop genocide. For more information, please visit www.genocideintervention.net.
Human Rights Watch is one of the world’s leading independent organizations dedicated to defending and protecting human rights. By focusing international attention where human rights are violated, we give voice to the oppressed and hold oppressors accountable for their crimes. Our rigorous, objective investigations and strategic, targeted advocacy build intense pressure for action and raise the cost of human rights abuse. For 30 years, Human Rights Watch has worked tenaciously to lay the legal and moral groundwork for deep-rooted change and has fought to bring greater justice and security to people around the world. Visit www.hrw.org

i-ACT/Stop Genocide Now seeks to empower individuals within communities, institutions, and governments to take personal responsibility to act on behalf of those affected by genocide, mass atrocities, and crimes against humanity.  i-ACT is a global team dedicated to putting a face on the numbers of dead, dying, and displaced while creating mutually enriching relationships between those in danger and those willing and able to act, fostering a new culture of participation.  For more information, please visit www.stopgenocidenow.org

 
Investors Against Genocide is a non-profit organization dedicated to convincing mutual fund and other investment firms to change their investing strategy so as to avoid complicity in genocide. The organization works with individuals, companies, organizations, financial institutions, the press, and government agencies to build awareness and to create financial, public relations, and regulatory pressure for investment firms to change. The ultimate goals are that the Government of Sudan ends its deadly genocide in Darfur and that investment firms avoid investing in genocide. For more information, visit www.investorsagainstgenocide.org.
 
Physicians for Human Rights was founded in 1986 on the idea that health professionals, with their specialized skills, ethical duties, and credible voices, are uniquely positioned to investigate the health consequences of human rights violations and work to stop them. We are headquartered in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and maintain an office in Washington, DC. We are a non-profit, non-sectarian organization funded through private foundations and by individual donors. Membership is open to all, not just health professionals. PHR shared the 1997 Nobel Peace Prize. Visit www.physiciansforhumanrights.org.
 
The Save Darfur Coalition – an alliance of more than 180 faith-based, advocacy and human rights organizations – raises public awareness about the ongoing genocide in Darfur and mobilizes a unified response to the atrocities that threaten the lives of people throughout the Darfur region. The coalition’s member organizations represent 130 million people of all ages, races, religions and political affiliations united together to help the people of Darfur. For more information on the coalition, please visit www.SaveDarfur.org

 

 

Dark Clouds Hover Over Sudan CPA Anniversary

Date: 
Jan 8, 2010
For Immediate Release
January 8, 2010
Contact
Emily Diamond-Falk, 202.525.8153
emily@savedarfur.org
Eileen White Read, 202.641.0779
eread@enoughproject.org
Joshua Berkman, 212.792.2893
ischwab@ajws.org
 

Dark Clouds Hover Over Sudan CPA Anniversary
Movement Leaders Respond After Secretary Clinton and General Gration’s Remarks

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The coming year represents a volatile time for the people of Sudan, with countrywide elections scheduled for April 2010, and a referendum on the secession of southern Sudan in January 2011. The Administration must work with international partners to hold the parties, especially Khartoum, accountable for lack of progress.

Save Darfur Coalition, American Jewish World Service and the Enough Project and the Center for America Progress respond:

Jerry Fowler – President, Save Darfur Coalition
“It’s important that Secretary Clinton acknowledged that basic freedoms necessary for fair elections do not exist in Sudan. But she and the US government need to accept the implication of that: with only about 90 days until they occur, the elections simply can’t be credible. It’s clear that the ruling NCP is hoping that fraudulent elections will legitimize its rule. The US must not let that happen.”

 

Ruth Messinger – President, American Jewish World Service
“The milestone that prompted today’s statement is not an anniversary to commemorate, but a wake up call. At the five-year mark, several critical benchmarks that will shape the future for millions of Sudanese remain unmet. We expect Secretary Clinton’s continued personal engagement and leadership during this crucial time in Sudan.”

 

John Prendergast – Co-Founder, Enough Project at the Center for American Progress
"U.S. officials are sending mixed messages on the degree to which they support democracy and human rights in Sudan. The security laws on the books today give no chance for democratic elections and human rights protections. It is of particular concern that the administration appears to not be willing to see the upsurge in violence in southern Sudan as partially a product of new arms being delivered to ethnic-based militias. These actions need to be condemned and planning needs to begin for multilateral consequences for stealing an election and pursuing a one way path to renewed national war."

###

About the coalition: The Save Darfur Coalition – an alliance of more than 180 faith-based, advocacy and human rights organizations – raises public awareness about the ongoing genocide in Darfur and mobilizes a unified response to the atrocities that threaten the lives of people throughout the Darfur region. The coalition’s member organizations represent 130 million people of all ages, races, religions and political affiliations united together to help the people of Darfur. For more information on the coalition, please visit www.SaveDarfur.org.

About American Jewish World Service: American Jewish World Service (AJWS) is an international development organization motivated by Judaism's imperative to pursue justice. AJWS is dedicated to alleviating poverty, hunger and disease among the people of the developing world regardless of race, religion or nationality. Through grants to grassroots organizations, volunteer service, advocacy and education, AJWS fosters civil society, sustainable development and human rights for all people, while promoting the values and responsibilities of global citizenship within the Jewish community.

About Enough: Enough is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on crises in Sudan, Chad, eastern Congo, northern Uganda, Somalia, and Zimbabwe. Enough’s strategy papers and briefings provide sharp field analysis and targeted policy recommendations based on a “3P” crisis response strategy: promoting durable peace, providing civilian protection, and punishing perpetrators of atrocities. Enough works with concerned citizens, advocates, and policy makers to prevent, mitigate, and resolve these crises. For more information, please visit www.enoughproject.org/.

Obama Needs to Make Sudan a Priority in 2010

Date: 
Jan 8, 2010

      

For Immediate Release
January 8, 2010
Contact
Eileen White Read, 202.641.0779
eread@enoughproject.org
 

Obama Needs to Make Sudan a Priority in 2010:
Fifth Anniversary of Peace Agreement Highlights Urgent Requirement for High-Level Engagement

The signing of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement, or CPA, five years ago was a monumental achievement by the Sudanese parties and by the international community. The CPA ended more than two decades of civil war between Sudan's North and South and set forth a roadmap and timetable for the democratic transformation of the country.

However, five years after the peace was signed, the notion of democratic transformation of Sudan has been abandoned by the ruling National Congress Party and the Sudan People's Liberation Army/Movement, and the potential for a return to all-out war before or after the 2011 self-determination referendum for southern Sudan is more real than ever.

Without high-level engagement by the Obama administration and its international partners, including robust use of pressures and incentives necessary to alter the current calculations of the parties -- the kind of engagement that yielded the signing of the CPA -- the international community must prepare to accept the consequences of a destabilized and volatile Sudan for years to come.

"The time has come to impose multilateral consequences for actions and decisions that will lead Sudan back to full-scale war," says Enough Co-founder John Prendergast. "President Obama must make the difficult choices to begin ratcheting up pressure, particularly on the ruling NCP, and to build a coalition of countries willing to join the United States in pressuring the parties for peace. Without demonstrating that kind of multilateral resolve, a return to war is inevitable. There must be a cost to war-mongering."

"The international community cannot afford to look the other way as Sudan faces a year fraught with flashpoints that threaten to derail the peace agreement," argues Enough's Juba-based field researcher Maggie Fick. "The people of Sudan have lost confidence in the CPA as a vehicle for a peaceful and democratic future in Sudan, and neither side is working in good faith toward this future."

"The Obama administration has helped secure a number of agreements between the NCP and the SPLM in recent months, but there remains an incredible amount of work that still needs to be done; time is painfully short, and the international community is far from achieving a unified approach to Sudan. That makes for a very dangerous recipe in the days ahead, and the international community must recognize the enormous risks they will take on in Sudan and in the region absent internationally coordinated pressure on all sides to adhere to their commitments," says Enough Executive Director John Norris. "The United States must follow through on its benchmarks-based approach to assessing the progress of the Sudanese parties in their implementation of the CPA and adopt a much more aggressive peacemaking effort in Darfur."

###
Enough is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on crises in Sudan, Chad, eastern Congo, northern Uganda, Somalia, and Zimbabwe. Enough’s strategy papers and briefings provide sharp field analysis and targeted policy recommendations based on a “3P” crisis response strategy: promoting durable peace, providing civilian protection, and punishing perpetrators of atrocities. Enough works with concerned citizens, advocates, and policy makers to prevent, mitigate, and resolve these crises. The RAISE Hope for Congo campaign aims to build a permanent and diverse constituency of activists advocating for effective change in eastern Congo, including an end to the long-running conflict and the resulting sexual violence against women and girls, and reforms to reduce trade by rebel groups in conflict minerals. To schedule an interview, please contact Eileen White Read at eread@enoughproject.org; phone 202 641 0779.

STRATEGY PAPER: Stealing an Election in Slow Motion: Time for Real Consequences

Date: 
Dec 21, 2009

 

For Immediate Release
December 21, 2009
Contact
Eileen White Read, 202.641.0779
eread@enoughproject.org
 
Read the strategy paper. 
 
Sudan’s national elections scheduled for April 2010 will be neither free nor fair absent significant international pressure on the ruling National Congress Party, or NCP, to change the electoral landscape. The Enough Project's latest strategy paper, "Stealing an election in Slow Motion: Time for Real Consequences," argues that the Obama administration must immediately impose consequences on the NCP and be prepared not to recognize the outcome if elections are held in the current climate of violence and political intimidation.
"The first step in ramping up meaningful pressure would be for the U.S. to suspend its support for anything but the local election monitors who will help determine the credibility--or lack thereof--of the process ," said John Prendergast, Enough's founder and the report's author. "Business as usual has to end.  There should be no veneer of legitimacy for a process that lacks any credibility."
The recent crackdown by the NCP on senior opposition politicians and the use of tear-gas on pro-democracy protesters demonstrates in no uncertain terms that the basic requirements of credible elections have not been met.  “The U.S. and other donors to the electoral process need to stand up and conclude that the Emperor is as naked as he ever was, and blow the whistle now on this deadly charade,” says Prendergast.
Credible elections in Darfur are impossible given rampant insecurity and attacks on civilians and the displacement of the majority of Darfur’s population, and elections in the South could intensify inter-communal and political tensions. “A stolen election would be the beginning of the end for the Comprehensive Peace Agreement," argues Prendergast.  "The NCP will almost certainly exploit what it would quickly claim was newfound 'democratic legitimacy' to prevent southern Sudanese from holding the self-determination referendum scheduled for 2011. If that happens, it would be fanciful to think that anything short of full-scale national war would result.”
"If nothing changes before April, U.S. taxpayers will have spent nearly $100 million to support the election of an indicted war-criminal and legitimize the iron-fisted rule of one of the world’s most oppressive regimes," says Enough Executive Director John Norris. "In this context, it is time to alter course in bold and specific ways in order to avert what could be the deadliest conflagration in Sudan’s war-torn post-colonial history."
Read the strategy paper. 
Visit the Enough Project’s blog, Enough Said, for updates on this issue.
 
Follow The Enough Project on Twitter: http://twitter.com/enoughproject.
Enough is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on crises in Sudan, Chad, eastern Congo, northern Uganda, Somalia, and Zimbabwe. Enough’s strategy papers and briefings provide sharp field analysis and targeted policy recommendations based on a “3P” crisis response strategy: promoting durable peace, providing civilian protection, and punishing perpetrators of atrocities. Enough works with concerned citizens, advocates, and policy makers to prevent, mitigate, and resolve these crises. The RAISE Hope for Congo campaign aims to build a permanent and diverse constituency of activists advocating for effective change in eastern Congo, including an end to the long-running conflict and the resulting sexual violence against women and girls, and reforms to reduce trade by rebel groups in conflict minerals. To schedule an interview, please contact Eileen White Read at eread@enoughproject.org; phone 202 641 0779.
If you would rather not receive future email messages from Center for American Progress, let us know by clicking here.
Center for American Progress, 1333 H St. NW, Washington, DC 20005-4707 United States

 

Lord's Resistance Army Sends Chilling Threat to Congolese Civilians

Date: 
Dec 16, 2009

 

For Immediate Release
December 16, 2009
Contact
Eileen White Read, 202.741.6376
eread@enoughproject.org
 
Lord’s Resistance Army’s Sends Chilling Threat to Congolese Civilians: ‘We Will Celebrate Christmas With You’                 
 
WASHINGTON, D.C– Enough, the anti-genocide project at the Center for American Progress, released the following statement today regarding incursions by the Lord's Resistance Army rebel group against civilians in the Democratic Republic of the Congo:
 
Enough calls on the United Nations Security Council and member states, including the United States as the greatest contributor to U.N. peacekeeping, to put immediate pressure on the Congolese government and the U.N. peacekeepers to improve civilian protection in the north-eastern reaches of the Democratic Republic of the Congo.
Recent interviews conducted by Enough Project researchers traveling in Haut Uele and Bas Uele in Province Orientale, in northern Congo, suggest that the Lord's Resistance Army--a transnational terrorist group with a 20-year record of atrocities--is threatening to repeat the massacres it committed during Christmas 2008, in which over 800 Congolese civilians were brutally murdered. Meanwhile, Congolese army units deployed to protect local populations from the LRA continue to commit grave abuses against Congolese civilians.
The LRA have killed nearly 1,500 Congolese civilians and abducted 3,000 more (including at least 700 children) since the Ugandan army launched an offensive against the LRA in December 2008. The presence of 6,000 Congolese soldiers in Province Orientale--many of them integrated brigades of former rebels and local militia from the troubled Kivu provinces in eastern Congo--has actually made matters worse. The U.N. Mission in the Congo, or MONUC, has deployed to the affected region, but peacekeepers conduct only limited patrols in some LRA-affected area that provide little deterrent against LRA attacks and Congolese army abuses.  A battalion of Tunisian reinforcements that was supposed to deploy in June 2009 has yet to arrive.
"Civilians in Haut Uele and Bas Uele not only face the threat of LRA attack, but are also subject to the predations of the Congolese soldiers sent to protect them," said Enough policy advisor Colin Thomas-Jensen. "The international community must press the Congolese government and the United Nations peacekeepers to better protect civilians from attacks."
During a research mission in Haut Uele last week, an Enough field researcher spoke to Congolese civilians who had received direct warnings from the LRA of fresh attacks against the villages of Ngilima, Bangadi and Niangara. "Residents of Bangadi and Niangara, as well as local and international relief organizations, also reported having seen letters from the rebels threatening mass killings during the upcoming holiday period," recounted Enough field researcher Ledio Cakaj. "We spoke to former captives of the LRA who recently escaped. They frequently heard the rebels talk about 'celebrating' Christmas with the people of Ngilima, a clear reference to LRA attacks of last Christmas."
The LRA might be planning fresh Christmas attacks as a response to recent claims by the Congolese and Ugandan governments that the rebels are finished. Recent LRA attacks against Ngilima, Bangadi and Niangara demonstrate that the insurgency is far from over, and that the LRA is as brutal as ever. On November 26, a family of eight was burned alive by the LRA in their hut close to Bangadi. Similar attacks reported in the villages of Ngilima and Niangara have left more many dead. On December 2, LRA rebels captured and cut off the ears and lips of a man near Bangadi. On December 12, two men and a woman were mutilated by LRA rebels in Ngulu, 25 km southeast of Bangadi.
Although Congolese soldiers are stationed in a few LRA-affected areas, these forces are raping, killing, and looting the very population they are supposed to protect. Living with the Congolese army is like living with a viper,” a local resident told Enough. “I have never seen worse behaving people throughout my life.”
U.N. peacekeepers are absent in the villages where the threat of LRA attacks is most acute. Humanitarian organizations have called for increased U.N. troops to provide civilian protection for the last two years. A new battalion of Tunisian peacekeepers was approved by the U.N. Security Council in November 2008, but these badly needed reinforcements will not arrive in Orientale until at least February 2010.
The recurrent violence and inadequate U.N. protection have forced humanitarian organizations to suspend distribution of food in the hardest hit areas. Unable to cultivate their lands or access humanitarian aid, the residents of Bangadi, Ngilima and Niangara have grown desperate. "We are being exterminated by the LRA and from hunger," a resident of Bangadi told Enough.
"The status quo in northeastern Congo and other LRA affected areas is a miserable failure with an appalling human cost." said Enough Co-Founder John Prendergast. "As  a matter of urgency, the United Nations Security Council must work with regional governments and other concerned nations to put in place a more effective counter-insurgency strategy to end the LRA threat once and for all." 
Visit the Enough Project’s blog, Enough Said, for updates on this issue.
Follow The Enough Project on Twitter; http://twitter.com/enoughproject.
###
Enough is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on crises in Sudan, Chad, eastern Congo, northern Uganda, Somalia, and Zimbabwe. Enough’s strategy papers and briefings provide sharp field analysis and targeted policy recommendations based on a “3P” crisis response strategy: promoting durable peace, providing civilian protection, and punishing perpetrators of atrocities. Enough works with concerned citizens, advocates, and policy makers to prevent, mitigate, and resolve these crises. The RAISE Hope for Congo campaign aims to build a permanent and diverse constituency of activists advocating for effective change in eastern Congo, including an end to the long-running conflict and the resulting sexual violence against women and girls, and reforms to reduce trade by rebel groups in conflict minerals. To schedule an interview, please contact Eileen White Read at eread@enoughproject.org; phone 202 641 0779.
If you would rather not receive future email messages from Center for American Progress, let us know by clicking here.
Center for American Progress, 1333 H St. NW, Washington, DC 20005-4707 United States
 

 

Niotan Inc. Fails to Address Concerns About Conflict Minerals

Date: 
Dec 14, 2009
Author: 
Eileen White Read

 

 

Press Release: Niotan Inc. Fails to Address Concerns About Conflict Minerals

In a December 7 statement, Nevada-based Niotan Inc. claimed that it "does not source tantalum from the Democratic Republic of the Congo" and denied reports suggesting that it is linked to conflict minerals originating in eastern Congo.

 
The Report of the UN Group of Experts on the Democratic Republic of Congo, and concurrent research by the Enough Project, raises significant concerns regarding links between Niotan and a network of companies tied to conflict minerals originating in militarized mining sites in eastern Congo. Although Niotan claims to be "a leader regarding transparency and traceability," their statement provides no information on where Niotan does source its minerals from, and what steps they take to ensure that their materials are conflict-free.
 
Documents obtained by the UN Group of Experts and the Enough Project indicate the following:
 
1. Niotan imports tantalum from Refractory Metals Mining Company Ltd.
 
U.S. Customs records indicate that Niotan imported 31.8 tons of tantalum ore from Refractory Metals Mining Company Ltd. in 2009. This consisted of two different shipments on June 27, 2009 and October 31, 2009 from Hong Kong into Los Angeles and New York in container numbers MSKU7422214 and CCLU3471921. Furthermore, until January 2009, Refractory Metals was named Niotan, Ltd.
 
2. Refractory Metals sources Congolese tantalum from African Ventures Ltd.
 
Niotan Chief Executive Officer John Crawley is also a director of Refractory Metals. He admitted to UN investigators in writing that Refractory Metals received 53 metric tons of tantalum of Congolese origin from the company African Ventures Ltd, which is located on the same street as Refractory Metals in Hong Kong, China. Mr. Crawley stated that African Ventures trading activities are entirely financed by Refractory Metals.
 
Mr. Crawley told UN investigators that African Ventures was initially set up by his father and that "the company was set up to in order to purchase and hold concessions in the DRC that would form the basis of our long term mine investment strategy." Both Refractory Metals and African Ventures employ the consultant Chris Huber, according to Mr. Crawley. Mr. Huber has been linked to the trade in conflict minerals going back to the early part of this decade, when he worked for Rwanda Metals, a company set up by the Rwandan government to systematically export tantalum ore from occupied areas of eastern Congo.
 
3. African Ventures sources conflict minerals from eastern Congo
 
African Ventures purchases minerals from an array of businesses linked to conflict actors in eastern Congo. This includes tantalum ore sourced from the MH1 concession in North Kivu, a militarized site linked to former members of the CNDP rebel group. African Ventures also sources other minerals, including tin ore and tungsten ore, from sources linked to the FDLR rebel group and the Bisie mining site in North Kivu, site of a massacre that killed 30 people on August 13.
 
Mr. Crawley said that Niotan never purchased any material from Congo, nor did it purchase any intermediate products resulting from Congolese minerals. Instead he suggests "a Chinese factory most likely" took this Congolese material.
 
To demonstrate transparency, both Niotan and Refractory Metals should make public the precise origins of their tantalum. This should include the tantalum imported by Niotan, as well as the tantalum supplied by African Ventures to Refractory Metals. For all of the materials purchased by Niotan and Refractory Metals containing tantalum, the two companies should provide due diligence documentation, including the precise origins of these materials and their chain of custody, and subject this documentation to independent verification.
 
Furthermore, in order to assure the U.S. government, United Nations officials, business associates, and the wider public that Niotan is not dealing with conflict minerals from eastern Congo, Niotan should disclose the owners and shareholders of Niotan, Refractory Metals, and African Ventures, and clarify the relationships between these entities.
 
Enough calls on the electronics industry to trace, audit, and certify the 3T (tantalum, tin, and tungsten) and gold minerals that it purchases as verifiably conflict-free. Enough further urges Congress to pass the Conflict Minerals Trade Act (H.R. 4128) and Congo Conflict Minerals Act (S. 891) to help clean up the conflict minerals supply chain. For more information, visit www.enoughproject.org/conflict-minerals. To schedule an interview, contact Eileen White Read, Associate Director of Communications, eread@enoughproject.org; 202 741 6376.

The Enough Project Deplores Sudan's Arrest of Opposition Party Members

Date: 
Dec 7, 2009

For Immediate Release
December 7, 2009


Eileen White Read, 202.741.6376
eread@enoughproject.org

 

STATEMENT: The Enough Project Deplores Sudan's Arrest of Opposition Party Members
 

WASHINGTON, D.C. –  The Enough Project at the Center for American Progress today released the following statement in reaction to news that the government of Sudan had arrested several members of the opposition political party, the SPLM:

"It was fanciful of the United States and other donor nations to think that the ruling National Congress Party (NCP), which has ruled Sudan with an iron fist and tolerated no peaceful dissent, would suddenly loosen its grip and allow peaceful elections and their necessary precursor: peaceful freedom of assembly," said Enough Co-founder John Prendergast.

"Today's reaction by the NCP-controlled security services demonstrates further that the U.S. should not be financing this electoral charade unless the laws are amended to allow the basics of a credible election," Prendergast continued. "President Obama should recognize that any benchmarks-based policy of incentives and pressures will have no credibility unless consequences are imposed immediately when such an obvious benchmark like today's denial of a basic element of the existing North-South peace deal -- freedom of assembly for the elections -- has been violated."

As Prendergast testified last week before the Africa and Global Health Subcommittee of the House Foreign Affairs Committee: "Until the parties agree to conditions that will allow a credible election, the United States and broader international community should suspend all electoral assistance.  Non-credible elections should not be financed and legitimized by American taxpayers.  The parties should agree to delay the election until these CPA-mandated conditions exist, because the U.S. and international community should not recognize any election that does not meet basic standards."
 


 
Enough is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on crises in Sudan, Chad, eastern Congo, northern Uganda, Somalia, and Zimbabwe. Enough’s strategy papers and briefings provide sharp field analysis and targeted policy recommendations based on a “3P” crisis response strategy: promoting durable peace, providing civilian protection, and punishing perpetrators of atrocities. Enough works with concerned citizens, advocates, and policy makers to prevent, mitigate, and resolve these crises. For more information, please visit www.enoughproject.org.

Sudan Ambassador Misleading Public About Situation in Sudan and Latest Enough Project Strategy Paper

Date: 
Dec 1, 2009

For Immediate Release 
December 1, 2009

Contact 
Eileen White Read, 202.741.6376
 
eread@enoughproject.org

Sudan Ambassador Misleading Public About Situation in Sudan and Latest Enough Project Strategy Paper

WASHINGTON, D.C– The statement by Sudan's U.N. Ambassador, Abdalmahmoud Abdalhaleem, in reaction to our new report demonstrates the dangerous self-constructed reality in which the National Congress Party (NCP) continues to live. We are concerned by the Ambassador’s statements which demonstrate Khartoum’s continued efforts to downplay the dire situation on the ground in Sudan, undermine existing negotiations, and sidestep its primary responsibility for this state of affairs.

The situation in Darfur and the South is deteriorating, and diplomatic efforts have not clearly addressed the fact that the ruling NCP continues to undermine prospects for peace.  The most salient facts include:

  • Violence against civilians continues unabated in Darfur and in southern Sudan, and the ruling National Congress Party, or NCP, continues to act in bad faith and undermine lasting peace in Sudan.
  • In Darfur, relief organizations clearly do not have access to large areas of territory, and those that do have access to vulnerable populations no longer publicize their assessments for fear of expulsion. 
  • The NCP is blocking the establishment of conditions for free and fair elections and seeks to undermine a self-determination referendum scheduled for 2011.
  • Inter-communal violence in southern Sudan is increasing, with growing evidence that Khartoum’s divide and destroy policies are partly to blame.
  • Reform of Sudan’s draconian national security law has yet to occur, despite persistent attempts by the Sudan Peoples’ Liberation Movement, or SPLM, to revise the law in advance of voter registration.
  • The NCP refuses to accept reforms to the bill that would limit the powers of the Khartoum regime’s national security service, or NISS, to arbitrarily arrest and detain people, one of many repressive practices against civilians protected by this law.
  • The NCP, after publicly and repeatedly promising to uphold and implement the Permanent Court of Arbitration’s ruling on the boundaries of Abyei, is now deliberately obstructing demarcation of these boundaries. By blocking funding to the demarcation team and by fueling insecurity on the ground in Abyei in order to prevent the team from physically demarcating the formerly contested northern boundaries of the region, the NCP is clearly failing to keep its promise to implement the arbitration court’s ruling.

Enough Co-Founder John Prendergast elaborates, “As the United States considers its options going forward, it is essential that the reality of the present situation on the ground be fully understood. We stand by our assessment and reiterate the need for the international community – led by the Obama administration – to introduce credible pressures on any party that is obstructing peace in Sudan.  At this juncture, the party primarily responsible for continuing conflict in Darfur and the possibility of renewed conflict in the South and Nuba Mountains is the National Congress Party.  The point of these pressures is precisely the opposite of the warmongering of which Sudan’s ambassador accuses us.  These pressures should be applied now in support of serious negotiations to resolve Darfur’s war and prevent the resumption of war between North and South.”

####

For additional information:

VISIT the Enough Project’s blog, Enough Said, for updates on this issue. 
FOLLOW the Enough Project on Twitter,
http://twitter.com/enoughproject.

The Center for American Progress is a nonpartisan research and educational institute dedicated to promoting a strong, just and free America that ensures opportunity for all. We believe that Americans are bound together by a common commitment to these values and we aspire to ensure that our national policies reflect these values. Enough is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on crises in Sudan, Chad, eastern Congo, northern Uganda, Somalia, and Zimbabwe. Enough’s strategy papers and briefings provide sharp field analysis and targeted policy recommendations based on a “3P” crisis response strategy: promoting durable peace, providing civilian protection, and punishing perpetrators of atrocities. Enough works with concerned citizens, advocates, and policy makers to prevent, mitigate, and resolve these crises. For more information, contact Eileen White Read, 202.741.6376; eread@enoughproject.org.

If you would rather not receive future email messages from Center for American Progress, let us know by clicking here. Center for American Progress, 1333 H St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005-4707 United States.

 

 

 

 

 

NGOs Welcome the Conflict Minerals Trade Act of 2009

Date: 
Nov 19, 2009

For Immediate Release
November 19, 2009

Contact
Corinna Gilfillan, 202.380.3583
cgilfillan@globalwitness.org

Eileen White Read, 202.741.6376
eread@enoughproject.org

 
STATEMENT: NGOs Welcome the Conflict Minerals
Trade Act of 2009
                         
WASHINGTON, D.C–  A coalition of international nonprofit organizations – including the Enough Project at the Center for American Progress, Human Rights Watch, World Vision, Oxfam America, Global Witness, International Labor Rights Forum, Genocide Intervention Network, Resolve Uganda, Falling Whistles, Jewish World Watch, Mennonite Central Committee, As You Sow, and the United Methodist Church General Board of Church and Society – today released the following joint statement regarding the introduction of the Conflict Minerals Trade Act of 2009 in the U.S. House of Representatives:
 

We welcome the introduction of the Conflict Minerals Trade Act of 2009 in the United States House of Representatives by Congressman Jim McDermott (D-Washington). This bill would help develop the means to ensure that the multimillion dollar trade in minerals from eastern Congo stops financing the world’s deadliest conflict since World War II. It will also help raise awareness about the issue to both the public and policy makers.
 
The trade in the 3 T’s - tin ore (cassiterite), tantalite (coltan), tungsten (a source derived from wolframite), as well as gold—that are used, among other things, in electronic devices such as cell phones and laptops—are a major source of funding for armed groups in eastern Congo who commit atrocities against civilians. If passed, this bill would create a system of audits and import declarations that would distinguish those goods imported into the United States that contain conflict minerals. The resulting transparency would be an important step forward in helping break the links between the mineral trade and human rights violations, such as killings of unarmed civilians and sexual violence—and the resulting humanitarian crises which comes from trade in conflict minerals. This legislation would also contribute to the development of mechanisms to allow the Congolese people to benefit from these resources. More broadly, the bill directs the United States government to develop a comprehensive strategy toward conflict minerals.

 

What would this bill do?
 
This bill demands greater transparency and accountability from those companies whose products contain these mineral ores or their derivatives. The U.S. government would identify those commercial goods that could contain conflict minerals, approve a list of independent monitoring groups qualified to audit the worldwide processing facilities for these minerals, and eventually restrict the importation of minerals to those from audited facilities. Importers of these goods would have to certify on their customs declaration that their goods “contain conflict minerals” or are “conflict mineral free” based upon this audit system. The audits would determine the mines of origin for processed materials, verify the chain of custody and verify information provided by suppliers through investigations in the DRC and other countries.
 
Importantly, the bill would also direct the State Department to support multilateral and U.S. government efforts to break the link between the trade in minerals and armed conflict in eastern Congo. Specific measures include:

  • development of a U.S. government strategy to address conflict minerals;
  • support for further investigations by the UN Group of Experts;
  • mapping of which armed groups control key mines in eastern Congo;
  • inclusion of information on the negative impact of mineral exploitation and trade on human rights in Congo in the annual human rights reports;
  • guidance for companies to exercise due diligence;
  • expanded U.S. efforts to improve conditions and livelihoods for communities in eastern Congo who are dependent upon mining; and,
  • GAO review to evaluate adherence and effectiveness of policies 


Legislation in the US alone will not end the conflict in eastern Congo, but this bill would provide a crucial step toward the creation of a practical and enforceable means to ensure that the trade in Congolese minerals contributes to peace rather than war. This bill would also serve as a useful precedent for other countries to develop legislation for holding to account companies in their jurisdiction who may be fuelling the conflict in eastern Congo.

We encourage concerned members of the public to contact their representatives and demand that they actively support this legislation to help ensure that consumer electronics and other goods imported into the US are conflict free. 

 
Visit the Enough Project’s blog, Enough Said, for updates on this issue.

Follow the Enough Project on Twitter: http://twitter.com/enoughproject.
 

 
The Center for American Progress is a nonpartisan research and educational institute dedicated to promoting a strong, just and free America that ensures opportunity for all. We believe that Americans are bound together by a common commitment to these values and we aspire to ensure that our national policies reflect these values. We work to find progressive and pragmatic solutions to significant domestic and international problems and develop policy proposals that foster a government that is "of the people, by the people, and for the people."
Enough is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on crises in Sudan, Chad, eastern Congo, northern Uganda, Somalia, and Zimbabwe. Enough’s strategy papers and briefings provide sharp field analysis and targeted policy recommendations based on a “3P” crisis response strategy: promoting durable peace, providing civilian protection, and punishing perpetrators of atrocities. Enough works with concerned citizens, advocates, and policy makers to prevent, mitigate, and resolve these crises. The RAISE Hope for Congo campaign aims to build a permanent and diverse constituency of activists advocating for effective change in eastern Congo, including an end to the long-running conflict and the resulting sexual violence against women and girls, and reforms to reduce trade by rebel groups in conflict minerals. To schedule an interview, please contact Eileen White Read at eread@enoughproject.org; phone 202 641 0779.
If you would rather not receive future email messages from Center for American Progress, let us know by clicking here.
Center for American Progress, 1333 H St. NW, Washington, DC 20005-4707 United States

 

From Mine to Mobile Phone: The Conflict Minerals Supply Chain

Date: 
Nov 10, 2009

 

For Immediate Release
November 10, 2009
Contact
Eileen White Read, 202.741.6376
eread@enoughproject.org
 
From Mine to Mobile Phone: The Conflict Minerals Supply Chain
 
READ the strategy paper.
WASHINGTON, D.C. – The scramble for minerals did not spark the conflict in eastern Congo, but war profiteering has become the fuel that keeps the region aflame and lies beneath the surface of major regional tensions, notes a strategy paper released today by the Enough Project at the Center for American Progress.
 
"From Mine to Mobile Phone: The Conflict Minerals Supply Chain,” describes in detail the path that “conflict minerals” travel between their extraction during mining in the eastern region of the Democratic Republic of the Congo and their use in the manufacture of cell phones, laptops, MP3 players, and video game systems. The Enough Project paper identifies six separate steps in this complex supply chain.
 
"Understanding how the supply chain works is critical to persuading electronics companies to finally produce verifiably conflict-free cell phones and computers," says Sasha Lezhnev, the paper's co-author. "Conflict minerals lie beneath the surface of major regional tensions. Those who benefit from this deadly trade know full well that they are dealing with illegally exploited minerals, and they do so with a wink and a nod from governments and larger purchasers that have a vested interest in maintaining the status quo." 
 
John Prendergast, the paper's co-author and a co-founder of the Enough Project, adds: "Because companies do not currently have a system to trace, audit, and certify where their materials come from, all cell phones and laptops likely contain conflict minerals from Congo. By demanding conflict-free products, consumers have a critical role to play in ensuring that Congo’s minerals to benefit its people rather than the armed groups that prey upon them."
READ the strategy paper.
####
For additional information:
VISIT the Enough Project’s blog, Enough Said, for updates on this issue.
FOLLOW the Enough Project on Twitter, http://twitter.com/enoughproject.
 
The Center for American Progress is a nonpartisan research and educational institute dedicated to promoting a strong, just and free America that ensures opportunity for all. We believe that Americans are bound together by a common commitment to these values and we aspire to ensure that our national policies reflect these values. Enough is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on crises in Sudan, Chad, eastern Congo, northern Uganda, Somalia, and Zimbabwe. Enough’s strategy papers and briefings provide sharp field analysis and targeted policy recommendations based on a “3P” crisis response strategy: promoting durable peace, providing civilian protection, and punishing perpetrators of atrocities. Enough works with concerned citizens, advocates, and policy makers to prevent, mitigate, and resolve these crises. For more information, contact Eileen White Read, 202.741.6376; eread@enoughproject.org.
If you would rather not receive future email messages from Center for American Progress, let us know by clicking here. Center for American Progress, 1333 H St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005-4707 United States.

 

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