Press Releases

‘A Benchmarks Report Card for Sudan’: Rights Groups Find Sudanese Peace Process is Stagnating and Backsliding

Date: 
May 6, 2010

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contacts:
Jonathan Hutson, Enough Project, jhutson@enoughproject.org,
202-386-1618
Andrea Clarke, Save Darfur Coalition, andrea@savedarfur.org, 202-460-6756?
Joshua Berkman, American Jewish World Service, jberkman@ajws.org, 212-792-2893
Mame Annan-Brown, Genocide Intervention Network, annan-brown@genocideintervention.net, 202-559-7409
Gabriel Stauring, iAct/Stop Genocide Now, gabriel@stopgenocidenow.org, 310-415-2863
Susan Morgan, Investors Against Genocide, susan@paxcommunications.org, 617-797-0451
 

 

‘A Benchmarks Report Card for Sudan’: Rights Groups Find Sudanese Peace Process is Stagnating and Backsliding

WASHINGTON, D.C. - An independent review by six leading human rights and Sudan advocacy groups reveals that the Sudanese peace processes for Darfur and Southern Sudan show no significant progress. They are at best stagnating and at worst backsliding toward complete failure and a return to full-scale, national war.

The report released today, “A Benchmark Report Card for Sudan,” analyzes 28 leading indicators of progress across nine overarching categories of benchmarks over the past six months. The report concludes that 17 indicators show significant worsening of the situation on the ground, while the remaining 11 indicators show a stalemate. The Enough Project and the Save Darfur Coalition developed the report along with partners American Jewish World Service, Genocide Intervention Network, iAct/Stop Genocide Now, and Investors Against Genocide.

John Norris, the Enough Project’s Executive Director, stated, “The report card for Sudan reveals an absence of progress. This clear-eyed, transparent, and independent analysis makes painfully clear how much work remains to be done and how dire the situation remains on the ground. The administration indicated it would apply pressures if the parties failed to make progress. Well, the parties have slowed to a halt and are sliding backward in critical areas.”

“Six months ago the Obama administration released its strategy to bring peace to Sudan,” said Mark Lotwis, Acting President of the Save Darfur Coalition. “While the new policy included no public benchmarks to measure progress in conditions on the ground, the policy was backed by strong statements of support for a policy of incentives and pressures by Secretary of State Clinton and UN Ambassador Susan Rice."

“Assessment of progress and decisions regarding incentives and disincentives will be based on verifiable changes in conditions on the ground. Backsliding by any party will be met with credible pressure in the form of disincentives leveraged by our government and our international partners.”  -- Secretary of State Clinton, October 19, 2009

“There will be no rewards for the status quo, no incentives without concrete and tangible progress. There will be significant consequences for parties that backslide or simply stand still. All parties will be held to account.” -- UN Ambassador Susan E. Rice, October 19, 2009

“Our report card for Sudan calls for Clinton and Rice to fully implement the Sudan policy and be ready to respond with multilateral pressure when Sudan’s dictator Omar al-Bashir fails to make progress towards peace,” said Lotwis.

A Benchmark Report Card for Sudan” demonstrates that, despite the initially encouraging signs that the administration was committed to seeing verifiable change in Sudan, there has been a lack of change since the administration’s policy was put into place. It argues that President Obama should empower Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Ambassador to the U.N. Susan Rice to personally step up and make sure that the regime in Khartoum is held accountable for a lack of progress and for backsliding away from peace.

Read ”A Benchmark Report Card for Sudan.

###

Enough is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on crises in Sudan, eastern Congo, northern Uganda, and Somalia. Enough’s strategy papers and briefings provide sharp field analysis and targeted policy recommendations based on a “3P” crisis response strategy: promoting durable peace, providing civilian protection, and punishing perpetrators of atrocities. Enough works with concerned citizens, advocates, and policy makers to prevent, mitigate, and resolve these crises. For more information, please visit www.enoughproject.org
 
American Jewish World Service (AJWS) is an international development organization motivated by Judaism's imperative to pursue justice. AJWS is dedicated to alleviating poverty, hunger and disease among the people of the developing world regardless of race, religion or nationality. Through grants to grassroots organizations, volunteer service, advocacy and education, AJWS fosters civil society, sustainable development and human rights for all people, while promoting the values and responsibilities of global citizenship within the Jewish community. Visit
www.ajws.org
 
Genocide Intervention Network empowers individuals and communities with the tools to prevent and stop genocide. Currently focused on conflicts in Sudan, Burma and Democratic Republic of Congo, among other areas of concern, Genocide Intervention Network envisions a world in which the global community is willing and able to protect civilians from genocide and mass atrocities.  The organization is building a permanent anti-genocide constituency, mobilizing the political will to prevent and stop genocide. For more information, please visit
www.genocideintervention.net

i-ACT/Stop Genocide Now seeks to empower individuals within communities, institutions, and governments to take personal responsibility to act on behalf of those affected by genocide, mass atrocities, and crimes against humanity.  i-ACT is a global team dedicated to putting a face on the numbers of dead, dying, and displaced while creating mutually enriching relationships between those in danger and those willing and able to act, fostering a new culture of participation.  For more information, please visit www.stopgenocidenow.org
 
Investors Against Genocide is a non-profit organization dedicated to convincing mutual fund and other investment firms to change their investing strategy so as to avoid complicity in genocide. The organization works with individuals, companies, organizations, financial institutions, the press, and government agencies to build awareness and to create financial, public relations, and regulatory pressure for investment firms to change. The ultimate goals are that the Government of Sudan ends its deadly genocide in Darfur and that investment firms avoid investing in genocide. For more information, visit
www.investorsagainstgenocide.org
 
The Save Darfur Coalition –an alliance of more than 190 faith-based, advocacy and human rights organizations – raises public awareness about the ongoing crisis in Darfur and mobilizes a unified response to promote peace throughout the Darfur region and all of Sudan. The coalition’s member organizations represent 130 million people of all ages, races, religions and political affiliations united together to help the people of Sudan. Please join the movement at
www.SaveDarfur.org
 

 

 

 

 

 

PRESS RELEASE: How Sudan Is Backsliding on Benchmarks Crucial to Peace: Rights Groups

Date: 
Apr 29, 2010

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contacts:
Jonathan Hutson, Enough Project, 202-386-1618, jhutson@enoughproject.org
Julia Thornton, Humanity United, 650-587-2016, jthornton@humanityunited.org
Andrea Clarke, Save Darfur Coalition, 202-460-6756, andrea@savedarfur.org
Joshua Berkman, American Jewish World Service, 212-792-2893, jberkman@ajws.org
Mame Annan-Brown, Genocide Intervention Network, 202-559-7409, annan-brown@genocideintervention.net
Gabriel Stauring, Stop Genocide Now, 310-415-2863, gabriel@stopgenocidenow.org
Susan Morgan, Investors Against Genocide, 617-797-0451, susan@paxcommunications.org
Ben Greenberg, Physicians for Human Rights, 617-510-3417, bgreenberg@phrusa.org

 

How Sudan Is Backsliding on Benchmarks Crucial to Peace: Rights Groups Why the U.S. Must Bring Pressure to Head Off Full-Scale War
 

READ the strategy paper by eight leading Sudan advocacy organizations
 
WASHINGTON, D.C. – A return to full-scale war can be headed off, say eight leading anti-genocide and Sudan advocacy organizations, but only if the Obama administration quickly implements its policy to pressure parties who are backsliding on benchmarks crucial to a durable peace in Sudan.

The Obama administration has stated that the parties in Sudan would be held accountable and incentives and pressures would be deployed in response to their measure of progress or backsliding on the ground.
 
Now, almost six months after the Obama administration’s initial Sudan policy review, which promised an assessment of certain leading indicators of progress – or lack thereof – the Obama administration has yet to make clear that it is actually pursuing its policy as stated while holding the parties accountable for their actions on the ground. To that end, an eight-member group of Sudan advocacy organizations has released an independent accounting and action plan, entitled “Grading the Benchmarks.”
 
“Grading the Benchmarks” argues that President Obama must own Sudan policy far more directly, and actually implement pressures and incentives where appropriate, or face growing risk that violence in Sudan will spiral.
 
The group includes the Enough Project at the Center for American Progress, Humanity United, American Jewish World Service, Genocide Intervention Network, iACT/Stop Genocide Now, Investors Against Genocide, Physicians for Human Rights, and the Save Darfur Coalition.
 
“A clear assessment of the situation on the ground in Sudan reveals a number of disturbing trends and the continued potential for much broader, renewed violence,” states Enough Project Executive Director John Norris. “However, we have yet to see a firm response from the administration despite its promise to bring a new approach to Sudan policy based on deeds, not rhetoric.”
 
The Obama administration built a diplomatic approach to Sudan around periodic, hard-nosed policy assessments of the situation on the ground. Yet to date, there are virtually no indications that the administration has held any of the parties to account for their actions.

“It’s been six months since President Obama’s Sudan policy went into effect and there has been no demonstrable progress towards peace, security, or justice in Sudan,” said Mark Lotwis, Acting President of the Save Darfur Coalition. “It’s time for the administration to back its words with deeds and increase the pressure on all parties in Sudan to end the conflict in Darfur, ensure a peaceful referendum for the South, and advance democracy and human rights throughout Sudan.”

READ “Grading the Benchmarks."
 
Also this week, Sudan Now, a campaign by anti-genocide and human rights organizations, has rolled out an ad campaign calling on President Obama to empower Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and United Nations Ambassador Susan Rice to take charge of implementing U.S. policy on Sudan. The organizations are running a series of print ads in the Washington Post and Washington Express, and in Politico.

###

Enough is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on crises in Sudan, eastern Congo, northern Uganda, and Somalia. Enough’s strategy papers and briefings provide sharp field analysis and targeted policy recommendations based on a “3P” crisis response strategy: promoting durable peace, providing civilian protection, and punishing perpetrators of atrocities. Enough works with concerned citizens, advocates, and policy makers to prevent, mitigate, and resolve these crises. For more information, please visit www.enoughproject.org

Humanity United is a philanthropic organization committed to building a world where mass atrocities and modern-day slavery are no longer possible. By helping to build permanent constituencies to end atrocities and slavery, supporting efforts that empower affected communities, and addressing the root causes of conflict and injustice, Humanity United seeks to help restore human dignity in places where it has been lost and to help create a lasting global peace. To learn more, visit www.HumanityUnited.org

American Jewish World Service (AJWS) is an international development organization motivated by Judaism's imperative to pursue justice. AJWS is dedicated to alleviating poverty, hunger and disease among the people of the developing world regardless of race, religion or nationality. Through grants to grassroots organizations, volunteer service, advocacy and education, AJWS fosters civil society, sustainable development and human rights for all people, while promoting the values and responsibilities of global citizenship within the Jewish community. Visit www.ajws.org
 
Genocide Intervention Network empowers individuals and communities with the tools to prevent and stop genocide. Currently focused on conflicts in Sudan, Burma and Democratic Republic of Congo, among other areas of concern, Genocide Intervention Network envisions a world in which the global community is willing and able to protect civilians from genocide and mass atrocities.  The organization is building a permanent anti-genocide constituency, mobilizing the political will to prevent and stop genocide. For more information, please visit www.genocideintervention.net

i-ACT/Stop Genocide Now seeks to empower individuals within communities, institutions, and governments to take personal responsibility to act on behalf of those affected by genocide, mass atrocities, and crimes against humanity.  i-ACT is a global team dedicated to putting a face on the numbers of dead, dying, and displaced while creating mutually enriching relationships between those in danger and those willing and able to act, fostering a new culture of participation.  For more information, please visit www.stopgenocidenow.org
 
Investors Against Genocide is a non-profit organization dedicated to convincing mutual fund and other investment firms to change their investing strategy so as to avoid complicity in genocide. The organization works with individuals, companies, organizations, financial institutions, the press, and government agencies to build awareness and to create financial, public relations, and regulatory pressure for investment firms to change. The ultimate goals are that the Government of Sudan ends its deadly genocide in Darfur and that investment firms avoid investing in genocide. For more information, visit www.investorsagainstgenocide.org

Physicians for Human Rights(PHR) mobilizes the health professions to advance the health and dignity of all people by protecting human rights. As a founding member of the International Campaign to Ban Landmines, PHR shared the 1997 Nobel Peace Prize. For more information, visit www.physiciansforhumanrights.org

The Save Darfur Coalition –an alliance of more than 190 faith-based, advocacy and human rights organizations – raises public awareness about the ongoing crisis in Darfur and mobilizes a unified response to promote peace throughout the Darfur region and all of Sudan. The coalition’s member organizations represent 130 million people of all ages, races, religions and political affiliations united together to help the people of Sudan. Please join the movement at www.SaveDarfur.org
 

Sudan Now Campaign Calls on Secretary Clinton and Ambassador Rice to Make Sudan a Priority

Date: 
Apr 26, 2010
Author: 
Jonathan Hutson

Contacts:
Jonathan Hutson, the Enough Project, (202) 386-1618, jhutson@enoughproject.org
Andrea Clarke, Save Darfur Coalition, (202) 460-6756, andrea@savedarfur.org
Julia Thornton, Humanity United, (650) 587-2030, jthornton@humanityunited.org

 

Sudan Now Campaign Calls on Secretary Clinton and Ambassador Rice to Make Sudan a Priority and Personally Lead U.S. Policy for Africa’s Largest Country

State Department officials’ leadership needed to guide Obama administration’s stalled policy on Sudan

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Following this month’s flawed national elections in Sudan, a group of anti-genocide and human rights organizations is calling on Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and United Nations Ambassador Susan Rice to increase their oversight of the faltering U.S. policy on Sudan. The organizations are making the call as part of the Sudan Now campaign, which is running a series of print ads beginning today in the Washington Post and Washington Express, and in Politico on Wednesday. Sudan Now is concerned that the current implementation of the six-month-old U.S. policy on Sudan has not addressed a number of troubling developments, including clear indications that the national election held earlier this month was neither free nor fair, ongoing government attacks in recent months have killed hundreds and displaced thousands, and ongoing obstruction by the Government of Sudan in access for aid workers and UN investigators to Darfur. Meanwhile, the country faces a vote for southern independence in January 2011—a possible trigger to a return to civil war.

“Sudan is entering into a critical period, with the aftermath of the elections still upon us and a referendum on southern Sudan’s independence immediately ahead. Secretary Clinton and Ambassador Rice need to get personally engaged if the United States wants to avoid a return to widespread bloodshed in Sudan,” said Randy Newcomb, president and CEO of Humanity United. “Only high-level engagement can ensure that the 2005 Comprehensive Peace Agreement is fully implemented and the international community acts together to ensure peace in Africa’s largest nation. The administration laid out a promising policy last year—it is time for President Obama and his top advisers to fully implement it.”

The Obama administration’s Sudan policy, announced in October 2009, clearly stated that tough benchmarks would be applied to Sudan, and that a committee of deputies from various cabinet agencies would assess progress “based on verifiable changes in conditions on the ground.” However, neither the administration nor the deputies’ review process have addressed the many disturbing developments on the ground:
• National elections that were neither free nor fair.
• A continuing offensive in Jebel Marra in Darfur that has killed hundreds and displaced thousands, and continued inability for relief organizations to access this area.
• Ongoing violence and clashes in South Sudan that have claimed more than 2,000 lives in the last year and driven a quarter-million people from their homes.
• Ongoing violations of a U.N. arms embargo on Darfur by both the Government of Sudan and rebel groups.
• The resistance of the Government of Sudan to cooperate in any form with the International Criminal Court investigating war crimes, crimes against humanity, and genocide in Sudan.

“Any fair reading of the situation on the ground in Sudan should make clear that the benchmarks established for Sudan by the Obama Administration simply have not been met,” said John Norris, executive director of the Enough Project. “If the administration turns a blind eye to such backsliding, the likelihood of greater conflict will only grow.”

“Looking to the future, Secretary Clinton and Ambassador Rice must push hard for a peace process that not only includes the government of Sudan and rebel leaders, but also the voices of Sudanese civil society. Concrete and lasting peace that addresses the root cause of the conflict can only be achieved by including all those who have a stake in the outcome—not just armed parties,” said Mark Lotwis, acting president of the Save Darfur Coalition. “One step the United States must insist on immediately is for the new government in Khartoum to open its doors to independent human rights monitoring and to stop harassing domestic human rights activists.”

Organizations participating in this week’s campaign include Humanity United, the Enough Project at the Center for American Progress, Save Darfur Coalition, Genocide Intervention Network, Stop Genocide Now, and Investors Against Genocide.

###

Sudan Now is a campaign led by a group of prominent anti-genocide and human rights advocacy organizations committed to bringing meaningful and lasting peace to Sudan and encouraging strong American leadership and action to achieve this goal. The campaign challenges President Barack Obama and top U.S. administration officials to live up to their promises to take strong and immediate action to help end the international crisis in Sudan and bring a lasting peace to the people of that country.

 

Sudan Now Campaign Calls on Secretary Clinton and Ambassador Rice to Make Sudan a Priority and Personally Lead U.S. Policy

Date: 
Apr 16, 2010
Sudan Now Campaign Logo
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
 
Contacts:
Jonathan Hutson, the Enough Project,  (202) 386-1618, jhutson@enoughproject.org
Andrea Clarke, Save Darfur Coalition, (202) 460-6756, andrea@savedarfur.org
Julia Thornton, Humanity United, (650) 587-2030, jthornton@humanityunited.org
 
 

Sudan Now Campaign Calls on Secretary Clinton and Ambassador Rice to Make Sudan a Priority and Personally Lead U.S. Policy for Africa’s Largest Country

State Department officials’ leadership needed to guide Obama administration’s stalled policy on Sudan

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Following this month’s flawed national elections in Sudan, a group of anti-genocide and human rights organizations is calling on Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and United Nations Ambassador Susan Rice to increase their oversight of the faltering U.S. policy on Sudan.
 
The organizations are making the call as part of the Sudan Now campaign, which is running a series of print ads beginning today in the Washington Post and Washington Express, and in Politico on Wednesday. Sudan Now is concerned that the current implementation of the six-month-old U.S. policy on Sudan has not addressed a number of troubling developments, including clear indications that the national election held earlier this month was neither free nor fair, ongoing government attacks in recent months have killed hundreds and displaced thousands, and ongoing obstruction by the Government of Sudan in access for aid workers and UN investigators to Darfur. Meanwhile, the country faces a vote for southern independence in January 2011—a possible trigger to a return to civil war.
 
“Sudan is entering into a critical period, with the aftermath of the elections still upon us and a referendum on southern Sudan’s independence immediately ahead. Secretary Clinton and Ambassador Rice need to get personally engaged if the United States wants to avoid a return to widespread bloodshed in Sudan,” said Randy Newcomb, president and CEO of Humanity United. “Only high-level engagement can ensure that the 2005 Comprehensive Peace Agreement is fully implemented and the international community acts together to ensure peace in Africa’s largest nation. The administration laid out a promising policy last year—it is time for President Obama and his top advisers to fully implement it.”
 
The Obama administration’s Sudan policy, announced in October 2009, clearly stated that tough benchmarks would be applied to Sudan, and that a committee of deputies from various cabinet agencies would assess progress “based on verifiable changes in conditions on the ground.” However, neither the administration nor the deputies’ review process have addressed the many disturbing developments on the ground:
  • ·         National elections that were neither free nor fair.
  • ·         A continuing offensive in Jebel Marra in Darfur that has killed hundreds and displaced thousands, and continued inability for relief organizations to access this area.
  • ·         Ongoing violence and clashes in South Sudan that have claimed more than 2,000 lives in the last year and driven a quarter-million people from their homes.
  • ·         Ongoing violations of a U.N. arms embargo on Darfur by both the Government of Sudan and rebel groups.
  • ·         The resistance of the Government of Sudan to cooperate in any form with the International Criminal Court investigating war crimes, crimes against humanity, and genocide in Sudan. 
 
“Any fair reading of the situation on the ground in Sudan should make clear that the benchmarks established for Sudan by the Obama Administration simply have not been met,” said John Norris, executive director of the Enough Project. “If the administration turns a blind eye to such backsliding, the likelihood of greater conflict will only grow.”
 
“Looking to the future, Secretary Clinton and Ambassador Rice must push hard for a peace process that not only includes the government of Sudan and rebel leaders, but also the voices of Sudanese civil society. Concrete and lasting peace that addresses the root cause of the conflict can only be achieved by including all those who have a stake in the outcome—not just armed parties,” said Mark Lotwis, acting president of the Save Darfur Coalition. “One step the United States must insist on immediately is for the new government in Khartoum to open its doors to independent human rights monitoring and to stop harassing domestic human rights activists.”
 
Organizations participating in this week’s campaign include Humanity United, the Enough Project at the Center for American Progress, Save Darfur Coalition, Genocide Intervention Network, Stop Genocide Now, and Investors Against Genocide.
 
###
 
Sudan Now is a campaign led by a group of prominent anti-genocide and human rights advocacy organizations committed to bringing meaningful and lasting peace to Sudan and encouraging strong American leadership and action to achieve this goal. The campaign challenges President Barack Obama and top U.S. administration officials to live up to their promises to take strong and immediate action to help end the international crisis in Sudan and bring a lasting peace to the people of that country. 

In Wake of Rigged Election, Rights Groups Call on White House to Take Firm Stance to Ensure Peace and Justice in Sudan

Date: 
Apr 20, 2010
Author: 
Jonathan Hutson

Contacts:
Jonathan Hutson, the Enough Project, 202-386-1618, jhutson@enoughproject.org
Andrea Clarke, Save Darfur Coalition, 202-460-6756, andrea@savedarfur.org
Susan Morgan, Investors Against Genocide, 617-797-0451, susan@paxcommunications.org
Suzanne Offen, American Jewish World Service, 240- 620- 5207, soffen@ajws.org

 

IN WAKE OF RIGGED ELECTION, RIGHTS GROUPS CALL ON WHITE HOUSE TO TAKE FIRM STANCE TO ENSURE PEACE AND JUSTICE IN SUDAN

U.S. Should Increase Pressure on Recalcitrant Actors To Reduce Risk of Full-Scale War, as Per Sudan Policy

 

WASHINGTON, D.C. – As the White House issued a statement that Sudan’s recent elections fell short of international standards and that political rights and freedoms were violated, leading human rights groups are calling on the Obama Administration to implement a policy of pressure and consequences to reduce the risk of full-scale war and prevent further manipulation by spoilers in Khartoum during the run-up to the January 2011 referendum on independence for Southern Sudan.

Mark Lotwis, Acting President, Save Darfur Coalition: “The Obama administration’s strategy for Sudan promised to hold Sudan’s regime accountable for its actions on the ground. Yet today’s statement neglects to assign responsibility and consequences for the failure of dictator Omar al-Bashir to create the conditions for a free and fair election. President Obama must lead world leaders to not recognize Bashir as a legitimately elected leader and to press for meaningful steps towards political freedom in Sudan in the run up to next year’s referendum to determine independence for South Sudan.”

John Prendergast, Enough: “Each time the Obama administration does not stand on principle and build international consequences for further abuses of human and civil rights, a powerful signal is sent to the Sudanese parties that fulfillment of commitments and agreements is not important. Unless President Obama implements his own stated policy of imposing consequences for unmet benchmarks, the potential increases for obstructions around the referendum and Darfur peace negotiations and thus a return to full-scale national war. The stakes continue to get higher in Sudan, and the administration's bar for moving forward continues to get lower."

Ruth Messinger, President, American Jewish World Service: “The elections are over and fundamentally little has changed. Darfur remains without a viable peace process, a host of issues remain unresolved ahead of the referendum in January and the NCP government once again confirmed its refusal to allow a true democratic transformation in Sudan. The administration must demonstrate that peace in Sudan is a priority worthy of the continued personal attention of the President, Vice President and Secretary of State."

Gabriel Stauring, Director, Stop Genocide Now: “Marginalized people in Sudan are being left behind and unprotected, in this rush to meet a time-line. U.S. Sudan policy is, in effect, promoting abuses and impunity, when it does not go beyond statements of regret and move towards true consequences and pressures. As we have seen with recent attacks in the Jebel Marra region of Darfur where hundreds died and thousands were displaced, real lives are at stake, and regrets do not do the job.

################

The Save Darfur Coalition is an alliance of more than 190 faith-based, advocacy and human rights organizations – raises public awareness about the ongoing crisis in Darfur and mobilizes a unified response to promote peace throughout the Darfur region and all of Sudan. The coalition’s member organizations represent 130 million people of all ages, races, religions and political affiliations united together to help the people of Sudan. Please join the movement at www.SaveDarfur.org.

Enough is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on crises in Sudan, Chad, eastern Congo, northern Uganda, Somalia, and Zimbabwe. Enough’s strategy papers and briefings provide sharp field analysis and targeted policy recommendations based on a “3P” crisis response strategy: promoting durable peace, providing civilian protection, and punishing perpetrators of atrocities. Enough works with concerned citizens, advocates, and policy makers to prevent, mitigate, and resolve these crises. For more information, visit www.enoughproject.org.

Stop Genocide Now is a grassroots community dedicated to working to protect populations in grave danger of violence, death and displacement resulting from genocide. Through active education, advocacy and policy change SGN resolves to change the way the world responds to genocide. SGN is currently focused on creating awareness and action to stop the genocide in Darfur and deal appropriately with its aftermath. All of our projects focus on and utilize the strength and power in grassroots connectivity. For more information, please visit www.stopgenocidenow.org
 

American Jewish World Service is an international development organization motivated by Judaism's imperative to pursue justice. AJWS is dedicated to alleviating poverty, hunger and disease among the people of the developing world regardless of race, religion or nationality. Through grants to grassroots organizations, volunteer service, advocacy and education, AJWS fosters civil society, sustainable development and human rights for all people, while promoting the values and responsibilities of global citizenship within the Jewish community. www.ajws.org

 

As Votes Are Counted Following Sudan Election, Advocacy Groups Call on Obama Administration Not to Legitimize the Results

Date: 
Apr 16, 2010

Sudan Now Logo

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE


Contacts:
Jonathan Hutson, the Enough Project,
202-386-1618, jhutson@enoughproject.org
Mame Annan-Brown, Genocide Intervention Network, 347-564-2936, annan-brown@genocideintervention.net
Andrea Clarke, Save Darfur Coalition, 202-460-6756,andrea@savedarfur.org
Julia Thornton, Humanity United, 650-587-2030, jthornton@humanityunited.org

 
Media Release: As Votes Are Counted Following Sudan Election, Advocacy Groups Call on Obama Administration Not to Legitimize the Results
 
WASHINGTON, D.C. – As the vote count begins in Sudan amid continued reports of electoral rigging and widespread political oppression, leading human rights organizations call on the Obama administration to be honest with itself, the Sudanese people and the international community in evaluating the results.
 
Mia Farrow, Actress and Human Rights Advocate, states: "The incumbent Sudanese president is an indicted war criminal. He threatened to slice off the fingers of election observers. The international community doesn't need a pile of bloody fingers to be able to point to the truth that this election is not free or fair."
 
The following advocacy group leaders are available for weekend interviews:
 
Mark Lotwis, Acting President, Save Darfur Coalition: ”Rather than confronting Sudan's regime and insisting on free and fair elections, the Obama administration and the international community has thus far gone silent in the face of voter intimidation, media censorship, and gross electoral irregularities. As attention moves toward the 2011 referendum, U.S. Special Envoy Gration must make respect for human rights a cornerstone of his engagement with all parties in Sudan.” 

Sam Bell, Executive Director, Genocide Intervention Network: "The national elections are a wasted opportunity. Closing its eyes to widespread irregularities in the run up to the elections, the international community will encourage future manipulation of democratic process and violation of international agreements by Sudan's ruling party."


John Prendergast, Co-founder of the Enough Project at Center for American Progress: "As bad as the elections are, the elections are a real diversion from the issues that are going to determine whether Sudan goes back to full-scale, national war or not. By not responding robustly to the multiple violations of the electoral process, the U.S. sends a signal that emboldens the ruling National Congress Party and demoralizes the Sudanese people. We're not responding to the resurrection of the Lord's Resistance Army. We're not responding to the major offensive in Darfur, in Jebel Marra over the last couple of months that led to so many people being killed and displaced. We're not responding to the non-implementation of key provisions of the CPA, the north/south peace agreement, like border demarcation. The Obama administration rolled out the president's policy in October 2009, promising benchmarks, deputy reviews and consequences. Half a year later, we've got no sign of benchmarks. We have had one, inconclusive deputies' meeting and no consequences for all these violations.”
Please note: Photography and broadcast quality recent b-roll from IDP camps are now available for general use at http://bit.ly/bgjPYr. Photography and video of Monday’s student protest at the State Department is available at http://bit.ly/c4ueOband http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dBvxAaXMfUU.
 ####
Sudan Now is a campaign led by a group of anti-genocide and human rights advocacy organizations committed to bringing meaningful and lasting peace to Sudan and encouraging strong American leadership and action to achieve this goal. The campaign challenges President Obama and top U.S. administration officials to live up to their promises to take strong and immediate action to help end the international crisis in Sudan and bring a lasting peace to Sudan’s people. Organizations participating in the campaign include Humanity United, the Enough Project at the Center for American Progress, Genocide Intervention Network, Stop Genocide Now, and Investors Against Genocide.

The Darfur Peace Process: Recipe for a Bad Deal?

Date: 
Apr 6, 2010

 

Enough Project & Center for American Progress

For Immediate Release
April 6, 2010

Contact
Jonathan Hutson, 202-386-1618
jhutson@enoughproject.org

REPORT: The Darfur Peace Process: Recipe for a Bad Deal?

Read the report.

WASHINGTON, D.C. Even as violence continues in the Jebel Marra area of Darfur, negotiators in the Qatari city of Doha are attempting to hammer out a peace deal for this western region of Sudan. While some observers have hailed these talks between rebel forces and the Government of Sudan as a major breakthrough, there are numerous reasons why enthusiasm should be tempered argues ‘The Darfur Peace Process: Recipe for a Bad Deal?,’ a short report from the Enough Project at the Center for American Progress.

Enough’s report on the Doha peace process builds upon an update that Enough released at the start of negotiations. Close monitoring of the highly fluid Doha peace process over the past month reveals a dramatic disconnect between the deal brokering in Qatar and the reality of violence on the ground in Darfur. Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir’s declaration that “the war in Darfur” is over cannot be taken at face value.

There is tangible evidence -- including the fact that the army is pursuing an offensive in Jebel Marra --that Sudan’s ruling National Congress Party, or NCP, continues to negotiate in bad faith, the strategy paper notes. The Government of Sudan has a strong interest in appearing conciliatory, not least because it hopes to legitimize itself in time for the elections now just days away, but its actions on the ground have worsened in recent weeks. Furthermore, tensions within and among rebel groups, fragile and shifting alliances, and a lack of transparency have characterized the Doha negotiations to date.

“The Doha process is hampered by backroom deals that put the Sudanese government in a strong, omniscient position while rebel groups jockey for temporary advantages, with little consideration for how their lack of unity leaves them collectively susceptible to government manipulation,” says Enough Project Advisor Omer Ismail, who travels regularly to the region. “With so many players clamoring for short-term gains without comprehensive knowledge or long-term outlooks, I fear we will see a replay of the 2006 Abuja talks’ failure.”

“There is much in the recent talks to suggest they are not built for success,” says John Norris, the Enough Project’s Executive Director. “The current Doha process replicates many of the exact same mistakes of earlier failed agreements at a time when the international community, frankly, should know better.”

Read ‘The Darfur Peace Process: Recipe for a Bad Deal?’.

####

For additional information:

VISIT the Enough Project's blog, Enough Said, for updates on this issue.
FOLLOW the Enough Project on Twitter, http://twitter.com/enoughproject.

The Center for American Progress is a nonpartisan research and educational institute dedicated to promoting a strong, just and free America that ensures opportunity for all. We believe that Americans are bound together by a common commitment to these values and we aspire to ensure that our national policies reflect these values. Enough is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on crises in Sudan, Chad, eastern Congo, northern Uganda, Somalia, and Zimbabwe. Enough’s strategy papers and briefings provide sharp field analysis and targeted policy recommendations based on a “3P” crisis response strategy: promoting durable peace, providing civilian protection, and punishing perpetrators of atrocities. Enough works with concerned citizens, advocates, and policy makers to prevent, mitigate, and resolve these crises. For more information, contact Jonathan Hutson, jhutson [AT] enoughproject.org, 202-386-1618.

If you would rather not receive future email messages from Center for American Progress, let us know by clicking here. Center for American Progress, 1333 H St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005-4707 United States.

As election crisis unfolds, Darfuris and U.S. advocates call on Congress to exercise more oversight over faltering Sudan policy

Date: 
Apr 1, 2010
Author: 
Jonathan Hutson

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contacts:
Susan Morgan, Investors Against Genocide, 617-797-0451 susan@paxcommunications.org
Jonathan Hutson, the Enough Project, 202-386-1618, jhutson@enoughproject.org
Mame Annan-Brown, Genocide Intervention Network, 202-559-7409, annan-brown@genocideintervention.net

 

WASHINGTON, D.C. – As Sudan’s national election descends into crisis amid growing opposition boycotts, U.S.-based Darfuris and policy experts from Sudan Now, a campaign led by a group of prominent anti-genocide and human rights organizations, are calling for Congress to step up its oversight of the current U.S. Sudan policy. The group is launching a social media campaign today to encourage leading members of Congress to privately and publicly engage with the Obama administration on Sudan.

“At this critical moment for Sudan, Congress should hold the administration responsible for faithful implementation of the Sudan policy released last October,” states Sam Bell, Executive Director of the Genocide Intervention Network.

According to the Sudan Now campaign, the current implementation of U.S. Sudan policy has not addressed a number of extremely concerning developments on the ground including Sudanese government attacks on Jebel Marra that have killed hundreds and displaced thousands in recent weeks, ongoing obstruction by the national government in access for aid workers and UN investigators to Darfur, and clear indications that the nationwide elections scheduled for April will be neither free nor fair.

“There have been any number of disturbing developments on the ground in Sudan, yet the reaction from the administration has been remarkably muted,” states John Norris, Executive Director of the Enough Project at the Center for American Progress. “A wide range of a Sudanese and international experts have clearly determined that the national election scheduled for this month will be neither free nor fair, and recent government attacks in Darfur have driven tens of thousands of innocent civilians from their homes. Yet, senior administration officials appear badly divided on their approach to Sudan at a time when coherent international leadership toward Sudan is more vital than ever.”

The Obama administration’s Sudan policy, announced in October 2009, clearly stated that tough benchmarks would be applied to Sudan, and that a committee of deputies from various cabinet agencies would assess progress “based on verifiable changes in conditions on the ground.” However, neither the administration nor the deputies’ review process have addressed the many concerning developments on the ground. These developments also include ongoing violence and clashes in South Sudan that have claimed more than 2,000 lives in the last year and driven a quarter-million people from their homes, ongoing violations of a U.N. arms embargo on Darfur by both the Government of Sudan and rebel groups, and the resistance of the Government of Sudan to cooperate in any form with the International Criminal Court investigating war crimes, crimes against humanity, and genocide in Sudan.

“It is time for the United States Government to support, encourage, and assist the ICC in moving forward on its indictment of Omar Bashir to afford both accuser and accused their rightful day in court, “states Abdelgabar Adam, President of Darfur Human Rights Organization. “Justice needs to be served through open to public scrutiny on the issues of whether human rights violations were committed by Mr. Bashir.”

“The people of Darfur want nothing more than to lead a normal life,” states Mohamed Suleiman, a Darfuri and the President of the San Francisco Bay Area Darfur Coalition. “They’d like to see their children grow up in a secure and peaceful Darfur. The international community, for eight consecutive years, has failed to make that possible. In fact, as each year has passed, Darfuris have come to realize that the international community caters to the need of the brutal regime in Khartoum rather than working in earnest to see a lasting peace in Darfur with security and justice for the people of Darfur.”

####

Sudan Now is a campaign led by a group of prominent anti-genocide and human rights advocacy organizations committed to bringing meaningful and lasting peace to Sudan and encouraging strong American leadership and action to achieve this goal. The campaign challenges President Barack Obama and top U.S. administration officials to live up to their promises to take strong and immediate action to help end the international crisis in Sudan and bring a lasting peace to the people of that country. Organizations participating in the campaign include Humanity United, the Enough Project at the Center for American Progress, Genocide Intervention Network, Stop Genocide Now, and Investors Against Genocide.

Deal Making in Sudan

Date: 
Mar 31, 2010

 

Enough Project & Center for American Progress

MEDIA CONTACTS: 
Jonathan Hutson, 202-386-1618
jhutson@enoughproject.org

REPORT RELEASE: Deal Making in Sudan

 

Read the report: http://www.enoughproject.org/publications/deal-making-sudan

JUBA, SUDAN/ WASHINGTON, D.C. The Enough Project at the Center for American Progress today released the following statement:

A series of deals in February 2010 over elements of Sudan’s Comprehensive Peace Agreement, or CPA, largely went under the radar of international media attention, but offers important insights into the current dynamics of deal making that may trigger a return to North-South war. The Obama administration should heed the lessons from these deals and encourage coordinated international action, argues “Deal Making in Sudan,” a new report from the Enough Project at the Center for American Progress.

“The motivations and means by which Khartoum and Juba negotiate the most contentious political issues in Sudan will ultimately determine whether the South’s self-determination referendum proceeds peacefully or plunges the country back into war,” argues the report by Maggie Fick, Enough's South Sudan field researcher. “The strategy (or lack thereof) behind the international community’s involvement in these negotiations will also have an enduring impact on security throughout the Horn of Africa.”

Without a coordinated international effort aimed at ensuring the timeliness of negotiations, one or both of the parties could use a delay in discussions to their advantage next year. The fact that the positions of the international community toward Sudan remain poorly coordinated and designed at this late hour could well spell trouble ahead.

“More and more of the negotiations between North and South appear to be taking place without effective international support or guidance," notes John Norris, Executive Director of the Enough Project. "While that may produce some deals in the short-term, that approach is unlikely to resolve the big-ticket issues that could spark a return to war such as how to split oil revenues or how to divide contested border areas. Enormous amounts of work remain to be done.”

Read the report: http://www.enoughproject.org/publications/deal-making-sudan

###

 

Enough is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on crises in Sudan, eastern Congo, and areas of Africa affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough’s strategy papers and briefings provide sharp field analysis and targeted policy recommendations based on a “3P” crisis response strategy: promoting durable peace, providing civilian protection, and punishing perpetrators of atrocities. Enough works with concerned citizens, advocates, and policy makers to prevent, mitigate, and resolve these crises. For more information, please visit www.enoughproject.org.

Tracy McGrady’s Darfur Dream Team Raises $600,000 for Twelve Schools Serving Refugee Children

Date: 
Mar 24, 2010

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
 

Contact: Jonathan Hutson, 202-386-1618, jhutson@enoughproject.org

 


RELEASE: Tracy McGrady’s Darfur Dream Team Raises $600,000 for Twelve Schools Serving Refugee Children
 

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Launched in March 2009, the Darfur Dream Team’s Sister Schools Program, co-founded by NBA star Tracy McGrady and John Prendergast of the Enough Project, has raised more than $300,000 to support six schools in Djabal refugee camp in eastern Chad. The Darfur Dream Team has also received additional financial pledges totaling $300,000 for six schools in a second camp. The funds and pledges received by McGrady and the Darfur Dream Team will provide 22,000 children in the twelve Darfuri refugee camp schools with access to quality education.

 

McGrady was inspired to travel to the camps in 2007 with Prendergast after speaking about the crisis with NBA legend Dikembe Mutumbo. Upon their return, McGrady and Prendergast co-founded the Darfur Dream Team’s Sister Schools Program.

 

“After spending time with children in the refugee camps, I was humbled and compelled to share their stories with the world,” said McGrady of the New York Knicks. “I wanted to do something different in order to help them. That is why we created the Darfur Dream Team.”

 

Since the Darfur crisis began, nearly 3 million people have been displaced by the conflict. More than 250,000 Darfuris have become refugees in neighboring Chad. Children make up more than 60 percent of the population in the Darfuri refugee camps. They face major educational challenges, including a shortage of qualified teachers, poorly built school buildings, and lack of supplies. The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, or UNHCR, will use the Darfur Dream Team’s generous donation to begin building and rehabilitating schools serving Darfuri children living in the refugee camps.

 

The Darfur Dream Team is a dynamic partnership of organizations and professional basketball players that aims to provide Darfuri refugee youth with access to education and to connect these students with their American peers through video-blogging and letter exchanges. This innovative program aims to empower Darfuri youth as community leaders and create a lasting peace across the region.

 

To date, over 350 U.S. middle schools, high schools, colleges and universities in 26 states have signed up for the program. U.S. sister schools are raising awareness and funds to support the education of their Darfuri peers.

 

“American students participating in the program are making an impact on the lives of Darfuri children, and also taking the opportunity to develop life-long bonds with their Darfuri peers,” said Prendergast, co-founder of the Darfur Dream Team.

 

McGrady continues to reach out to professional basketball players to make the crisis in Darfur a priority. Baron Davis, Derek Fisher, Luol Deng, Etan Thomas, and Jermaine O’ Neal have joined him as Darfur Dream Team co-captains. Together, they plan to launch in-arena activities with their respective NBA teams to support the initiative.  In addition to the NBA players, principal partner organizations in the Darfur Dream Team include: USA for UNHCR, the Enough Project, Participant Media, the Education Partnership for Children of Conflict, Facing History and Ourselves, and i-ACT.

###

The Darfur Dream Team’s Sister Schools Program links American middle schools, high schools, and universities with schools in the Darfuri refugee camps in eastern Chad.  U.S sister schools will raise funds to improve the education of their Darfuri peers through the construction and rehabilitation of school buildings and by providing supplies, sports equipment, and teacher training. The program will also foster cross-cultural relationships and mutual understanding between U.S. and Darfuri refugee students through letter exchanges and video blogging. The Sister Schools Program is a dynamic partnership involving professional basketball stars Tracy McGrady, Derek Fisher, Baron Davis, Luol Deng,  Etan Thomas, and Jermaine O'Neal; United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR);USA for UNHCR,  the Enough Project; Participant Media; TakePart.com;  Education Partnership for Children in Conflict, co-founded by Angelina Jolie and Gene Sperling; Facing History and Ourselves; and i-ACT. The partnership will expand to include additional professional basketball players. More than 100 U.S. schools have signed up to participate in the program.

The Center for American Progress is a nonpartisan research and educational institute dedicated to promoting a strong, just and free America that ensures opportunity for all. We believe that Americans are bound together by a common commitment to these values and we aspire to ensure that our national policies reflect these values. Enough is a project of the Center for American Progress to end crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on crises in Sudan, Chad, eastern Congo, northern Uganda, Somalia, and Zimbabwe. Enough’s strategy papers and briefings provide sharp field analysis and targeted policy recommendations based on a “3P” crisis response strategy: promoting durable peace, providing civilian protection, and punishing perpetrators of atrocities. Enough works with concerned citizens, advocates, and policy makers to prevent, mitigate, and resolve these crises. To learn more about Enough and what you can do to help, go to www.enoughproject.org.

                      
                                      

Center for American Progress Logo

Syndicate content