Media Advisories

Security Council Issues Sudans Statements, Addresses Violence in Jonglei

Date: 
Aug 23, 2013

Enough Project Media Advisory

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

WASHINGTON -- Today, the United Nations Security Council issued a presidential statement on Sudan and South Sudan and a press statement on the situation in Jonglei. The Enough Project welcomes the Council's statements and looks forward to discussing these developments in greater detail. 

John Prendergast, Co-Founder of the Enough Project stated:

"After almost a year of silence, the Security Council's call on Sudan to allow unfettered humanitarian access to the Two Areas will help bring this often neglected crisis back to the world's attention. However, their failure to mention of a self-determination referendum for Abyei or reference the need for a comprehensive approach to Sudan’s conflicts means more must be done."

Akshaya Kumar, Sudan and South Sudan Policy Analyst at the Enough project stated:

"In a major shift, for the first time, the Security Council expressed concerns about attacks against civilians by militias and the South Sudanese army in Jonglei state. International attention to this humanitarian crisis unfolding in the dark is welcome. We must do more to support inclusive peace and mediation efforts to negotiate a political solution and end the violence in Jonglei."

#

The Enough Project is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on the crises in Sudan, South Sudan, eastern Congo, and areas affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough conducts intensive field research, develops practical policies to address these crises, and shares sensible tools to empower citizens and groups working for change. To learn more about Enough, go to www.enoughproject.org.

Enough Media Advisory: Action Needed Now to Apprehend Joseph Kony and End the LRA

Date: 
Oct 7, 2012

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Tracy Fehr, tfehr@enoughproject.org, +1 202-459-1219

Please Note: Enough Project LRA Policy Analyst Ashley Benner and Enough Project LRA Field Researcher Kasper Agger are available to interview about the LRA issue.

WASHINGTON – Today, Invisible Children launched the video “MOVE” as part of its Kony 2012 campaign that introduced millions of people to the Lord’s Resistance Army, or LRA, crisis. Resolving this long-standing conflict requires further immediate and robust action by the United States government. The Obama administration must commit more diplomatic, military, intelligence, and logistical support to ensure the arrest of LRA leader Joseph Kony and his top commanders as part of a comprehensive strategy to end the LRA threat.

Enough Project LRA Policy Analyst Ashley Benner and LRA Field Researcher Kasper Agger recently returned from a trip to East and Central Africa. During this trip, Enough documented numerous challenges that hamstring current U.S., regional, and international efforts to bring an end to the LRA.

“The Obama administration has invested resources to help end the LRA conflict, including the deployment of military advisors to Central and East Africa,” said Ashley Benner, LRA Policy Analyst at the Enough Project. “But if the current trajectory continues, these efforts are not likely to succeed. To ensure that the mission to end the LRA is successful, the United States should eliminate LRA ’safe havens,’ keep the African armies vigorously involved in combating the LRA, provide additional helicopters and intelligence-gathering capabilities, and urge Uganda to institute a clear transitional justice policy that encourages the LRA to finally stop fighting.”

“We are coming up on the one year anniversary of the deployment of U.S. special forces to Central and East Africa to advise and assist in the fight against the LRA,” said Kasper Agger, LRA Field Researcher at the Enough Project. “The inconvenient truth is that the end of the LRA remains distant. Some progress has been made to encourage defections through 'come home' messages and safe places that LRA combatants can escape to; but the African forces are too few to cover the dense jungles and LRA safe havens are developing in Darfur, Congo, and parts of the Central African Republic where the group can loot, abduct and attack civilians. U.S. special forces should stay on the ground to keep the African forces committed and diplomatic efforts should focus on brokering access for the Ugandan army into the safe havens.”

“The existing international effort is not sufficiently designed at present to succeed in taking Kony off the battlefield and cratering the LRA leadership,” said Enough Project Co-founder John Prendergast. “The U.S. and Uganda need to collaborate more closely in constructing commando operations aimed at bringing Kony and other senior LRA leaders to justice wherever they are.  Current battlefield deployments are far from where Kony is hiding, and every day that goes by allows Kony and his commanders to recruit and rearm while international will and resources remain stagnant. That is a recipe for well-intentioned failure.”

For more information about recommendations for the U.S. and international community to ensure that efforts to end the LRA conflict are successful, read:

###

Enough is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, the Enough Project focuses on crises in Sudan, eastern Congo, and areas of Africa affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough’s strategy papers and briefings provide sharp field analysis and targeted policy recommendations based on a “3P” crisis response strategy: promoting durable peace, providing civilian protection, and punishing perpetrators of atrocities. Enough works with concerned citizens, advocates, and policy makers to prevent, mitigate, and resolve these crises. For more information, please visit www.enoughproject.org.

       

 

The Sudans to Conclude Negotiations While Humanitarian Situation Remains Unresolved

Date: 
Sep 21, 2012

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:

In Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: Amanda Hsiao, South Sudan Field Researcher, +251 (0) 923249353, ahsiao@enoughproject.org, Skype: ayrhsiao

In Washington, DC: Jennifer Christian, Sudan/South Sudan Policy Analyst, +1 202-604-4518, jchristian@enoughproject.org, Skype: jennchristian

ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia -- On September 23, Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir and South Sudanese President Salva Kiir are expected to meet in Addis Ababa to conclude agreements on outstanding issues between their two countries, including oil and financial arrangements, border disputes and demarcation, border security arrangements, and Abyei. 

“A grand bargain across the remaining issues between Sudan and South Sudan exists,” said Amanda Hsiao, Field Researcher. “The question is, will Presidents Kiir and Bashir demonstrate the leadership needed to locate the political compromises necessary for peace between the two countries?” 

Former South African President Thabo Mbeki, lead mediator of the negotiation process and head of the African Union High-Level Implementation Panel, is scheduled to brief the African Union Peace and Security Council on Monday, September 24 on the outcome of the negotiation process and provide recommendations on how to resolve any remaining outstanding issues.

In contrast, negotiations on the conflicts in South Kordofan and Blue Nile have not made enough progress. The government of Sudan continues to prevent the unhindered delivery of independent humanitarian aid to civilian populations in the two states.

“The government of Sudan’s continued denial of international humanitarian access to the two states contravenes a U.N. Security Council resolution, an agreement on aid delivery, and international law,” said Jennifer Christian, Policy Analyst. “Khartoum’s behavior demands immediate action on the part of the U.N. Security Council in the form of targeted sanctions and other actions designed to ensure the immediate delivery of necessary aid to affected populations.”

Who: Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir and South Sudanese President Salva Kiir

What: Meeting to conclude agreements on outstanding issues between Sudan and South Sudan

Where: Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

When: Sunday, September 23, 2012

Why: The meeting comes one day after the deadline set by the African Union for the conclusion of negotiations between Sudan and South Sudan on all outstanding issues arising from the latter’s declaration of independence in July 2011.

#

Enough is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, the Enough Project focuses on crises in Sudan, eastern Congo, and areas of Africa affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough’s strategy papers and briefings provide sharp field analysis and targeted policy recommendations based on a“3P” crisis response strategy: promoting durable peace, providing civilian protection, and punishing perpetrators of atrocities. Enough works with concerned citizens, advocates, and policy makers to prevent, mitigate, and resolve these crises. For more information, please visit www.enoughproject.org.     

New UW-Madison Student Group Pushes for Conflict-Free Campus

Date: 
Sep 18, 2012

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: JD Stier, Raise Hope for Congo campaign manager, (202)250-4057, jdstier@enoughproject.org

Madison, WI– On Friday, September 21, the Conflict-Free Campus Initiative, or CFCI, at UW-Madison will host a kickoff event introducing how students can get involved with promoting conflict-free technology on campus in order to stop the trade of conflict minerals funding armed groups in eastern Congo. The Conflict-Free Campus Initiative is a movement that has spread to more than 100 campuses across the nation, and has led 12 schools so far to pass resolutions giving preference to conflict-free electronics products.

The event will feature unique campus and national speakers including Raise Hope for Congo campaign manager and UW-Madison alum, JD Stier. Filmmaker Paul Freedman (Sand and Sorrow, Halfway Home) will film the event and document the journey of the student leaders as they launch the Conflict-Free Campus Initiative on Madison's campus, which will become a core story line for a comprehensive film about the conflict in Congo.

Who: Conflict-Free Campus Initiative at UW-Madison, a new student-led group advocating for the university administration to pass a conflict-free resolution

What: Conflict-Free Campus Initiative Kickoff

Where: Beefeaters Room in the Memorial Union, 800 Langdon St., Madison, WI, 53706

When: Friday, September 21, 2012 from 6:30PM – 7:30 PM, CST

Why: Armed groups in eastern Congo earn hundreds of millions of dollars every year from the sale of conflict minerals—gold, tin, tantalum and tungsten.  In order to control the mines, these armed groups use systematic violence and rape as a way to intimidate local communities.  The ongoing conflict in eastern Congo has claimed more than five million lives, and still continues today.

As purchasers of electronics products, U.S. consumers have a powerful role to play in helping to prevent this deadly trade. Collectively, students can work together to create a demand for responsible sourcing of minerals from Congo. With more than 40,000 students enrolled, UW-Madison has significant purchasing power that can be used to pressure electronics companies into creating conflict-free products and responsibly sourcing minerals from the Congo.

#

The Conflict-Free Campus Initiative draws on the power of student leadership and activism to bring about peace in Congo. It is a project of the Enough Project 's Raise Hope for Congo campaign and STAND.

Raise Hope for Congo aims to build a permanent and diverse constituency of activists who will advocate for the human rights of all Congolese citizens and work towards ending the ongoing conflict in eastern Congo. For additional information on the Conflict-Free Campus Initiative, and Raise Hope for Congo, please visit: http://www.raisehopeforcongo.org/content/conflict-free-campus-initiative

Enough Project: Sudan Fails to Comply with Nine Provisions of U.N. Security Council Resolution

Date: 
Aug 2, 2012

 

Enough Project Media Advisory

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Thursday, August 2, 2012

Contact: Jonathan Hutson, +1 202.386.1618jhutson@enoughproject.org

Today, August 2, marks the deadline for the conclusion of negotiations between the governments of Sudan and South Sudan as set by U.N. Security Council Resolution 2046. In an effort to identify the compliance of the government of Sudan, the government of South Sudan, and the Sudan People's Liberation Movement-North's with the provisions of Resolution 2046 to date, the Enough Project published a summary chart of its compliance tracker. The summary chart provides an organized outline showing that the government of Sudan has failed to comply with nine provisions of Resolution 2046, whereas the government of South Sudan has failed to comply with two provisions, and the SPLM-N has complied or has expressed a willingness to comply with all relevant provisions.

"Relatively speaking, the government of Sudan's non-compliance with critical provisions of Resolution 2046 is clear. These critical provisions include requirements that the Sudanese government withdraw its forces from the Abyei area and agree to the Tripartite Proposal on the delivery of humanitarian aid to South Kordofan and Blue Nile. In the coming days and weeks, the U.N. Security Council and the African Union Peace and Security Council should take into account the discrepancies in non-compliance between the government of Sudan, on the one hand, and the government of South Sudan and the SPLM-N, on the other, particularly vis-à-vis the possible application of sanctions pursuant to operative paragraph 6 of Resolution 2046," said Enough Project Sudan Policy Analyst Jennifer Christian.

Who: The Enough Project, a nonprofit organization based in Washington D.C. that is dedicated to ending genocide and crimes against humanity.

WhatUnited Nations Security Council Resolution 2046 Compliance Tracker: Summary Chart

Where: Addis Ababa, where negotiations between Sudan and South Sudan resumed today 

When: Thursday, August, 2, 2012 

Why: To summarize the government of Sudan, the government of South Sudan, and the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement-North’s respective compliance, or lack thereof, to date with the provisions of U.N. Security Council Resolution 2046.

#

Enough is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, the Enough Project focuses on crises in Sudan, eastern Congo, and areas of Africa affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough’s strategy papers and briefings provide sharp field analysis and targeted policy recommendations based on a“3P” crisis response strategy: promoting durable peace, providing civilian protection, and punishing perpetrators of atrocities. Enough works with concerned citizens, advocates, and policy makers to prevent, mitigate, and resolve these crises. For more information, please visit www.enoughproject.org.

A Multicultural Celebration in Honor of World Refugee Day

Date: 
Jun 19, 2012

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Buky Williams, 202-481-8172, bwilliams@enoughproject.org

 

Falls Church, VA - On Saturday, June 23, the Enough Project’s Darfur Dream Team, in  partnership with the Lutheran Social Services of the National Capital Area, will host a celebration in honor of World Refugee Day.

The event will include music, art, and food and is anticipated to be an educational, uplifting, fun, and participatory experience for all ages. This event is free and open to the general public, however a special invitation is extended to refugee families who have resettled in the DMV area. This celebration is possible due to the generous donations provided by Pop Chips, Whole Foods, Trader Joes, Amoos Kabob, Merkamo Ethiopian Bistro, Darfur Interfaith Network, Founding Farmers, and Blessed Coffee.

Who: Refugees resettling in the National Capital Area, the service providers and volunteers who support them, the Enough Project’s Darfur Dream Team Sister Schools Program, and Lutheran Social Services of the National Capital Area

What: A multicultural World Refugee Day Celebration

Where: St. Paul's Lutheran Church- 7426 Idylwood Road Falls Church, VA 22043
(Metro: West Falls Church)

When: Saturday, June 23, 2012 from 11:00AM - 3:00PM ET

Why: To celebrate World Refugee Day and honor the resilience of refugees resettling in the greater Washington, DC community. This event will also raise awareness about the situation in Darfur, emphasize the importance and urgency of keeping the peace in Darfur, and establish a strong foundation of refugee education to ensure a more positive future for the people of Darfur and Sudan.

The Enough Project is an anti-genocide organization whose Darfur Dream Team Sister Schools Program has a two-fold mission to provide quality education to every Darfuri refugee child while simultaneously developing personal connections between students from Darfur and the United States to promote mutual understanding.

Lutheran Social Services of the National Capital Area has been compassionately serving the community’s most vulnerable citizens since 1917. Their numerous programs which include adoption and foster care, community education, disaster response, refugee services, and youth camp were implemented as responses to emerging challenges faced by community members. Their Refugee and Immigrant Services program serves refugees and asylees in handling the challenges and opportunities they face once settled in the national capital area and help assist them in their journey to self-sufficiency.  

Bishop Andudu from Besieged Sudanese Region of South Kordofan to Testify before House Subcommittee

Date: 
Aug 3, 2011

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Sudan Now Media Advisory

Contact: Matt Brown, Associate Director of Communications, Enough Project

mbrown@enoughproject.org, 202-468-2925

WASHINGTON – Bishop Andudu Adam Elnail, the Anglican Bishop of Kadugli in Sudan’s South Kordofan, will testify before the U.S. House of Representatives subcommittee on Africa on Thursday, August 4 at 10 a.m. in the Rayburn Office Building room 2172.

The emergency hearing, called by Rep. Christopher Smith (R-NJ) and Rep. Donald Payne (D-NJ), will focus on the ethnic-based violence in Sudan’s South Kordofan region. In the past two months, the Sudanese army has carried out mass killings of civilians in Kadugli and a sustained bombing campaign in the Nuba Mountains.

Bishop Andudu, whose congregation witnessed many of the killings, came to the United States in May. He will provide testimony about his experiences and help inform the Congress Members’ policy of dealing with the Khartoum regime. Also scheduled to testify is Brad Phillips, conservative commentator and president of the Persecution Project Foundation and Dr. Luka Biong Deng from Kush, Inc., a Sudanese NGO working on peace and security issues in Abyei and the border regions.

###

Sudan Now is a campaign led by a group of anti-genocide and human rights advocacy organizations committed to bringing meaningful and lasting peace to Sudan and encouraging strong American leadership and action to achieve this goal. The campaign challenges President Obama, top U.S. administration officials, and the international community to live up to their promises to take strong and immediate action to help end the international crisis in Sudan and bring a lasting peace to Sudan’s people. Organizations participating in the campaign include Humanity United, the Enough Project at the Center for American Progress, Genocide Intervention Network/Save Darfur Coalition, Stop Genocide Now, Investors Against Genocide, and American Jewish World Service.  For more information, please visit www.sudanactionnow.org

How Celebrities are Making a Difference for Human Rights: The Enough Project Launches Celebrity Upstanders Database

Date: 
Jul 28, 2011

For Immediate Release

Editors, please note that for further information about the work of these celebrities, contact:

Jonathan Hutson, 202-386-1618

jhutson@enoughproject.org

Link: Celebrity Upstanders http://enoughproject.org/about/celebrity-upstanders

 

WASHINGTON Celebrities are becoming a significant contributing factor to human rights advocacy in Africa.

"Celebrities who use their fame to highlight the plight of some of the world's most vulnerable people are making a real difference. They have educated countless people and shined a light on issues that would otherwise remain shrouded in darkness. By recruiting thousands of people to relatively unknown causes, they help create a real pressure for change,” said Co-founder of the Enough Project John Prendergast, who works closely with many of the organization’s celebrity partners.

The Enough Project, which works to end genocide and crimes against humanity, has partnered with many celebrities to raise awareness about African human rights campaigns that include ending genocide in Sudan, and stopping the deadly conflict mineral trade in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Celebrity partners have advocated for these issues through participating in videos and interviews, traveling with the Enough Project to Africa, writing opinion-editorial pieces, and initiating further efforts to support these growing human rights concerns. For example:

  • George Clooney traveled to Sudan in October 2010 with John Prendergast, and initiated the Satellite Sentinel Project, which uses cutting edge technology to visually document human rights abuses in Sudan;
  • In May 2011, actor Javier Bardem participated in a Mother’s Day video with John Prendergast, to educate the public about the conflict minerals trade in the Congo, which was also translated into Spanish;
  • More recently, Chicago Bulls star and South Sudan native Luol Deng traveled with the Enough Project to South Sudan for the country’s independence. While there he hosted a youth basketball clinic and shot a video about South Sudan featured on the front page of Yahoo!;
  • And in August 2010, Ashley Judd traveled with the Enough Project to the DR Congo to learn more about the connection between the conflict minerals trade and violence in the region. Upon return, she appeared in two powerful CNN pieces that covered these topics, and raised awareness about the Congo’s deadly mineral trade.

To highlight these and other celebrities who have partnered to date with the Enough Project on various campaigns and initiatives, the Enough Project has launched an online Celebrity Upstanders database. This new web resource includes 44 celebrity profiles that feature video clips, press interviews, and opinion pieces, highlighting each individual celebrity’s involvement with the Enough Project, and its conflict areas in the Sudan, DR Congo, and LRA-affected communities.

The term “Upstander” originated from Samantha Power's book A Problem from Hell. It was also referred to in the book The Enough Moment: Fighting to End Africa's Worst Human Rights Crimes, written by actor/activist Don Cheadle and John Prendergast: "Throughout our lives, we will constantly have choices and opportunities to either become Upstanders or bystanders. If ENOUGH of us choose to be Upstanders, we can help change the course of history.”

Therefore, the many celebrities who have partnered with the Enough Project have become Celebrity Upstanders by raising awareness and making a difference on some of the most difficult human rights issues in the world today.

Links to Videos:

###

Enough is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, the Enough Project focuses on crises in Sudan, eastern Congo, and areas of Africa affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough’s strategy papers and briefings provide sharp field analysis and targeted policy recommendations based on a “3P” crisis response strategy: promoting durable peace, providing civilian protection, and punishing perpetrators of atrocities. Enough works with concerned citizens, advocates, and policy makers to prevent, mitigate, and resolve these crises. For more information, please visit www.enoughproject.org.

Media Backgrounder in Anticipation of South Sudan Independence

Date: 
Jul 7, 2011

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Jonathan Hutson, 202-386-1618, jhutson@enoughproject.org

WASHINGTON DC – As South Sudan’s Independence Day on July 9th approaches, the international community is focusing on the birth of its newest nation. Media outlets from around the world are covering this historical event. As a tool for journalists who do not have extensive background knowledge on the subject, the Enough Project has created this brief contextual overview on South Sudan and its related issues.

 

Overview

When Sudan becomes two countries on July 9, 2011, the two new states will face multiple and urgent crises. Although the referendum on Southern independence occurred peacefully on January 9, 2011, many of the other provisions of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement, or CPA, meant to result in democratic transformation across Sudan, remain unimplemented. Provocative military action by the Government of Sudan, especially in the flashpoint areas of Abyei and the Nuba Mountains, may constitute ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity. This has also aggravated tensions between North and South Sudan, and threatens a new international conflict. In the North, the Darfur conflict has deepened during the past year. Northern-stoked militia violence threatens the stability of the South and is exacerbated by abusive and indiscriminate southern responses.

Across both North and South Sudan humanitarian access is worsening and human rights abuses are increasing:

 

Key challenges

A peaceful and principled resolution to the crisis on the North-South border, including Abyei, South Kordofan, and Blue Nile. Across these critical areas, there is a need for both credible security arrangements that would protect civilians and help displaced people return home, and a political settlement based upon the measures agreed to by North and South in the CPA. Independent investigations are needed to hold those responsible for the reckless violence accountable. Pressures and consequences will need to be deployed to press the North and other spoilers of peace to accept a principled settlement to these crises before they erupt into an international conflict.

Peaceful resolution of other outstanding separation issues that could lead to a resumption of North-South war, including border demarcation, oil wealth sharing, and citizenship status. The internationally recognized secession of South Sudan will not itself prevent the resumption of large-scale conflict between North and South. Sustained U.S. diplomatic involvement will be critical to preventing a return to war over remaining issues including border demarcation, oil wealth sharing, and citizenship status.

An end to the crisis in Darfur and a comprehensive peace agreed to by all parties. Stopping the violence against civilians in Darfur and enabling the region’s millions of displaced people to return to their homes will require a political settlement between the government and the armed movements, as well as grassroots engagement once some semblance of security has been established. In the meantime, humanitarian and peacekeeper access is hampered by the government, and despite the presence of 23,000 peacekeepers, there is little protection for civilians and limited independent reporting on the situation.

Security for all people in the Republic of South Sudan, including protection from militia violence and responsible and accountable southern security services. As anticipated, proliferating militias have emerged in the wake of the southern referendum. Historical precedent and circumstantial evidence suggest that many are backed by the northern government with the aim of destabilizing the South, but there remain a range of grievances within the South that have fueled these uprisings and have been exacerbated by the southern government’s behavior.

Tangible and measurable steps toward democratic governance in the North and the South. Democratic transformation remains the unfulfilled promise of the CPA. The revolutionary wave across North Africa has already begun to impact Sudan, and although Khartoum has cracked down on protests, steps toward power sharing and democratic governance could still promote a more stable, less violent future for Northern Sudan. In the South, less than inclusive decisions by the ruling party have already contributed to worsening security, and the window for getting South Sudan started on the right foot is closing.

Accountability for crimes against humanity, war crimes, and genocide. Despite International Criminal Court, or ICC, warrants and African Union efforts, when it comes to atrocities committed in Sudan, impunity prevails. Until perpetrators of genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes are held accountable, violent and exploitative patterns of governance are likely to persist.

 

The Indispensable Role of the United States.

The U.S. has deployed high level diplomacy in pursuit of peace in Sudan, but in the face of intransigence and worsening violence, a solely incentives-oriented policy will not succeed. In fact, the imposition of escalating consequences is a complement to diplomacy not a substitute for it. By pressing for accountability for war criminals and using economic pressures to target spoilers, the U.S. can hamper warmongers and help encourage Sudanese leaders to return to the roadmap toward normalization on the basis of sustained peace.

Under these circumstances, Sudan Now calls for the following immediate U.S. government responses to escalation of war in Sudan:

  • Expand existing U.S. sanctions to target the individuals most responsible for the conduct of war in Sudan. Update the existing sanctions regime to enable the sanctioning of anyone who contributes to violence along the North-South border, per existing measures focused solely on Darfur.
  • Map the financial connections between senior Sudan government officials, the Sudanese military industrial complex, and their outside trade partners, financial backers, and intermediaries. Raise the pressure with credible threats and, as necessary, implementation of financial disruption and economic isolation on any party who contributes to the violence along the border, beginning with President Omer al-Bashir and his top advisor Nafie al Nafie.
  • Work with the European Union and lead multilateral efforts to block dollar and euro transactions against any party who contributes to the violence.
  • Dispatch a senior Obama administration official to Beijing, and engage China to work on joint diplomacy in support of a peace deal and develop an understanding of the need for both carrots and sticks to leverage that agreement, including economic isolation and an international arms embargo.
  • Provide UN civilian protection forces and a monitoring mechanism with access to Abyei, South Kordofan, and Blue Nile after July 9. Civilian protection forces could come in the form of a UN mission with civilian protection as a priority and access to the border regions backed by a flexible monitoring mechanism such as the Civilian Protection Monitoring Teams, or Joint Monitoring Mechanism previously used in the Nuba Mountains.
  • Push for an independent UN Human Rights Council investigation into the violence in Abyei and South Kordofan with possible referral to the International Criminal Court where cases of war crimes, crimes against humanity, or ethnic cleansing are identified.

Chicagoland Groups to Walk for Peace in Sudan’s Darfur Region

Date: 
Jul 6, 2011

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contacts: Valerie Kiebala, 224-465-6340, Valerie.Kiebala@gmail.com
Jonathan Hutson, 202-386-1618, jhutson@enoughproject.org

 

CHICAGO –  On July 9, the historic day that South Sudan becomes an independent nation separate from the rest of Sudan, Youth United for Darfur -- the Chicagoland coalition of high schools and colleges working together for peace and education for the people of Darfur -- will hold  its inaugural Walk with Darfur. The walk will take place on Saturday afternoon in downtown Chicago, in conjunction with the Sudanese Community Association of Illinois’ celebration of the independence of South Sudan.

Following the walk-a-thon, the program will hold a rally in support of peace in Sudan. Speakers will include Sudanese Community Association Executive Director Malual Awak, Dream Team Official Meghan Higginbotham from the anti-genocide group the Enough Project, and prominent elected officials and sports figures of Chicago.

The money raised from the walk-a-thon pledges and suggested donations of $25 will contribute to the Enough Project’s Darfur Dream Team Sister Schools Program, whose two-fold mission is to provide a quality education to every Darfuri refugee child, and to develop personal connections between students from Darfur and the United States to promote mutual understanding.

Who: Students from more than 40 Chicagoland high schools and colleges, organized by Youth United for Darfur, Enough Project’s Darfur Dream Team Sister Schools Program, http://www.DarfurDreamTeam.org, and the Sudanese Community Association of Illinois

What: 2011 Walk with Darfur

Where: A 3K walk along Lake Michigan at Diversey Harbor 

When: Saturday, July 9, 2011 at noon CDT . Participants will gather at 11:30 a.m. at the Diversey Harbor Grove at Barry Ave and Lake Shore Drive West, departing for the walk-a-thon at noon, and re-convening for the rally and speaker program at 2 p.m.

Why: To raise money for Darfuri refugee education, promote peace in Sudan's Darfur region, and celebrate the official recognition of South Sudan as an independent nation. The event will also emphasize the importance and urgency of keeping the peace in Darfur, as well as establishing a strong foundation of refugee education to ensure a more positive future for the people of Darfur and Sudan.

How to Register Online: http://darfurdreamteam.org/event/chicago

Syndicate content