Media Advisories

Congress Passes Historic Bill to “Eliminate, Neutralize and Disrupt Wildlife Trafficking”

Date: 
Sep 21, 2016

 

Enough Project applauds bipartisan effort in House and Senate to protect elephants, rhinos, and other endangered species facing extinction from out-of-control poaching by violent armed groups and international traffickers

September 21, 2016 (Washington, DC) – Today Congress passed critical legislation to protect elephants, rhinos and other endangered species from a sophisticated international poaching and trafficking trade that is decimating animal populations worldwide and funding armed groups. HR 2494, the “Eliminate, Neutralize and Disrupt Wildlife Trafficking Act of 2016” passed in the House today, following passage in the Senate last Thursday.

Kathryn Bigelow, Academy Award-winning director/producer (“The Hurt Locker,” “Zero Dark Thirty”), and creator of the film “Last Days,” about the slaughter of elephants and terrorism, said, “This is an important victory for elephants and other species under threat of extinction. We are rapidly losing magnificent species all over the world. What’s worse, that loss is to the benefit of some of the most violent militias and state regimes on the planet. These trafficking networks are becoming more and more sophisticated. We need to keep up.”

Holly Dranginis, Senior Policy Analyst at the Enough Project, said: “We are entering a new era of conservation. We have no choice but to recognize that wildlife poaching is synonymous with violent organized crime and large-scale, transnational corruption. This law is crucial because it responds to that reality. It combines conservation, law enforcement, and financial pressure tools in a powerful cocktail to finally address this problem as a complex global crisis. Poaching levels are off the charts so the law will need swift implementation for it to slow the tide of extinction. But in its final months, this is an intervention the Obama administration can very be proud of.”

Ian Schwab, Director of Advocacy and Impact Strategy at the Enough Project, said: "The slaughter of elephants and other wildlife trafficking is both a human and environmental disaster. The proceeds of these crimes fund armed groups including the Lord's Resistance Army. Congressional champions from both parties and both chambers worked together and created comprehensive legislation that recognizes the international networks essential in wildlife crimes by making wildlife trafficking a predicate offense under anti money laundering statutes."

Rachel Finn, Advocacy Manager at the Enough Project, said: "Countering human rights abuses and mass atrocities requires a sustained effort to dismantle the sources of funding allowing perpetrators to carry out their operations. As ivory trafficking has been documented as a source of financing for many such perpetrators in central and east Africa, we are thrilled that a bill, supported across the aisle, has passed Congress to tackle this challenge. HR 2494 creates real consequences for those involved in these illicit networks, and its passage is a strong, critical step in the right direction."

Link to HR 2494: https://www.congress.gov/bill/114th-congress/house-bill/2494

For media inquiries or interview requests, please contact: Greg Hittelman, Director of Communications, +1 310 717 0606gh@enoughproject.org.

About THE ENOUGH PROJECT
The Enough Project, an atrocity prevention policy group, seeks to build leverage for peace and justice in Africa by helping to create real consequences for the perpetrators and facilitators of genocide and other mass atrocities. Enough aims to counter rights-abusing armed groups and violent kleptocratic regimes that are fueled by grand corruption, transnational crime and terror, and the pillaging and trafficking of minerals, ivory, diamonds, and other natural resources. Enough conducts field research in conflict zones, develops and advocates for policy recommendations, supports social movements in affected countries, and mobilizes public campaigns. Learn more – and join us – at www.EnoughProject.org.

The Sentry Co-founders George Clooney and John Prendergast Join Don Cheadle and Investigators to Release Groundbreaking Report on War Profiteering in South Sudan

Date: 
Sep 12, 2016

 

2-year investigation reveals networks fueling one of the world’s deadliest conflict zones implicating president, deposed vice president, international banks, arms dealers, multinational oil and mining companies

Today, The Sentry, an investigative initiative co-founded by George Clooney and John Prendergast, presented a new, groundbreaking report “War Crimes Shouldn’t Pay: Stopping the looting and destruction in South Sudan.” Clooney and Prendergast joined Don Cheadle and lead investigators at the National Press Club in Washington DC to present findings of a two-year investigation into South Sudan’s shadowy war economy and its links to a network of international facilitators, including bankers, arms dealers, and multinational oil and mining companies. The report implicates South Sudan President Salva Kiir and former Vice President Riek Machar, who as rival leaders have been responsible for a civil war that has wreaked havoc on their nation.

This marked the first public presentation of The Sentry’s multi-country investigations into the links between massive corruption, war profiteering, and armed conflict. The Sentry is a collaboration between the Enough Project and Not On Our Watch, with their implementing partner the Center for Advanced Defense Studies.  The Sentry also focuses on Sudan, Somalia, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and the Central African Republic.

The report exposes top officials who have managed to accumulate fortunes profiting from massive corruption, fueling and exploiting a brutal civil war while their nation suffers famine-like conditions and the horrors of armed conflict, including mass rape, the burning of villages, and the use of child soldiers.

The Sentry’s work unveils a new and innovative approach to countering mass atrocities and to promote peace in some of the world’s deadliest conflict zones, utilizing the tools of financial pressure normally reserved for countering terrorism, organized crime, and nuclear proliferation.

Press conference livestream: www.thesentry.org/live

Report highlights:

  • South Sudan’s president and the former vice president, their families and inner circles have stashed fortunes that include overseas mansions, luxury cars, and stakes in an array of businesses – major multinational oil and mining companies, banks, casinos, and an airline — and have left a trail of murky transactions, insider deals, and outright fraud.
  • The report details international complicity at every turn — bankers, businessmen, arms dealers, real estate agents, and lawyers who facilitate their heist.
  • The Sentry found evidence of complicity in the looting and destruction of South Sudan on five different continents: Europe, Africa, Asia, and Australia, and North America.
  • The Sentry has collected images of family members of these top officials jet-setting and partying in 5-star hotels, and documentation of their offshore mansions and properties.
  • Researchers pored through thousands of pages of legal records, corporate filings, financial statements, transaction and shipping documents, and other official correspondence; tracked suspects’ online social media footprints; and utilized satellite imagery to gather and analyze data about their assets and movements. Investigators traveled to multiple locations including Melbourne, Adelaide, Addis Ababa, Kampala, Juba, Cairo and Nairobi, to gather evidence and interview hundreds of experts and eyewitnesses, many of whom spoke under the condition of anonymity.
  • Dossiers are already being turned over to US and international governments and agencies for enforcement action.
  • The report offers recommendations for an innovative new policy approach for preventing atrocities and promoting peace: combining anti-money laundering measures with targeted sanctions focused on the top leaders, accompanied by robust enforcement.

Report excerpts:

  • A VIOLENT CONTEST OVER SPOILS OF POWER: “The key catalyst of South Sudan’s civil war has been competition for the grand prize — control over state assets and the country’s abundant natural resources — between rival kleptocratic networks led by President Kiir and Vice President Machar. The leaders of South Sudan’s warring parties manipulate and exploit ethnic divisions in order to drum up support for a conflict that serves the interests only of the top leaders of these two kleptocratic networks and, ultimately, the international facilitators whose services the networks utilize and on which they rely.”
  • HUMAN SUFFERING: “South Sudan, the world’s newest state, continues to be embroiled in a horrific civil war. Tens of thousands of people have lost their lives, many of them civilians. Mass rape has been used as a weapon of war. Children are routinely recruited as soldiers and sent as cannon fodder into combat. As of July 2016, some 2.3 million people have been displaced by the conflict. A staggering 5.1 million people—almost half the country’s population—require food assistance. Entire towns have been destroyed. The Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) has called South Sudan “one of the most horrendous human rights situations in the world.”

Report recommendations:

This report proposes a new strategy to counter atrocities that will use the tools of financial pressure normally reserved for countering terrorism, organized crime, and nuclear proliferation for two purposes: first, to bring to account those government actors in South Sudan who until now have been able to operate with near impunity because the world imposes no consequences for their behavior; and second, to create significant and until now missing international leverage by altering the cost-benefit analysis of those leaders and shifting their incentives away from violence, atrocities, and corruption and toward peace, human rights, and transparency. The international community should take the following steps to create that accountability and leverage:

  1. Take proactive steps to curb the laundering of the proceeds of corruption in South Sudan –and crack down on any banks that fail to stop such transactions.
  2. Impose smarter sanctions on a wide array of high-impact targets and ensure these sanctions are robustly enforced.
  3. Encourage and support South Sudan’s neighbors to lead in combating the laundering of assets looted from South Sudan and imposing asset freezes on those most responsible for human rights violations and financial misconduct.
  4. Take proactive attempts to prevent de-risking. Directing anti-money laundering pressures against politically exposed persons in South Sudan could cause banks to determine that the risk of doing business with South Sudanese account holders is simply too high when compared with the incentives for maintaining business in the country. The Department of Treasury’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) should issue guidance to the banking community stressing that not every South Sudanese client is high-risk.
  5. Introduce a financial management system that prevents violent kleptocrats from capturing state institutions to facilitate the looting of public resources.

The Sentry brings together an experienced team of investigators, including former employees of the FBI, Treasury Department, other government agencies, intelligence communities, and Congress, as well as contributions from field researchers, country experts, academia and press.

During Monday’s press conference, Clooney, Cheadle, Prendergast, and members of the Sentry team will discuss the findings of this investigation and participate in a question-and-answer session with attending media.

WHO:   The Sentry co-founders George Clooney and John Prendergast, Not on Our Watch co-founder Don Cheadle, report author J.R. Mailey and key Sentry investigators. Interview opportunities with report authors should be requested prior.

FOR MEDIA – PRESS CONFERENCE:   Credentialed media are encouraged toRSVP for the press conference the press conference (include your full name and media outlet) to gh@enoughproject.org

FOR MEDIA – PRESS KIT: A press kit, including report graphics, team bios, and video b-roll is available at www.thesentry.org/presskit

FOR MEDIA – INTERVIEW REQUESTS: To request an interview following the press conference with one of the Sentry’s lead investigators, please contact Greg Hittelman gh@enoughproject.org

LOCATION: THE NATIONAL PRESS CLUB, Holeman Lounge
529 14th Street, NW, Washington, DC 20045

DATE/TIME: Monday, September 12, 2016
Media check-in: 9:30 a.m. ET
Press conference 10:00am – 11:00am ET

LINK TO REPORT: http://eno.ug/sentrywcsp

LIVESTREAM:  For media unable to attend the press conference in person, a livestream of the event of the event will begin at 10:00 am ET at www.thesentry.org/live

About THE SENTRY
The Sentry seeks to disrupt and dismantle the networks of military officers, government officials, businessmen, arms dealers, bankers, and other enablers who benefit financially and politically from Africa’s deadliest conflicts. Our investigations follow the money from conflict zones and into global economic centers, using open source data collection, field research, document collection, and state-of-the-art network analysis technology. The Sentry provides information and analysis that engages civil society and media, supports regulatory action and prosecutions, and provides policymakers and the private sector with the information they require to take effective action. Co-founded by George Clooney and John Prendergast, The Sentry is an initiative of the Enough Project and Not On Our Watch (NOOW), with its implementing partner C4ADS. Current countries of focus are South Sudan, Sudan, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Somalia, and the Central African Republic.  Learn more at TheSentry.org

Press Conference: Groundbreaking Investigation to Reveal War Profiteers Fueling Corruption-Driven Conflict in South Sudan

Date: 
Sep 6, 2016

 

George Clooney and John Prendergast, co-founders of The Sentry, join Don Cheadle and investigative team to present findings in Washington, D.C.

WHAT:   On Monday, September 12The Sentry, an investigative initiative co-founded by John Prendergast and George Clooney, will present the findings of a groundbreaking two-year investigation into the networks of South Sudan’s senior officials and their international facilitators, whose violent competition over corruption opportunities has turned their country into one of world’s deadliest war zones.

During Monday’s press conference, Clooney, Cheadle, Prendergast, and members of the Sentry team will discuss the findings of this investigation and feature a question-and-answer session with attending media. The Sentry is a collaboration between the Enough Project and Not On Our Watch, with their implementing partner the Center for Advanced Defense Studies.

The Sentry will release a report summarizing the results of nearly two years of following the money in South Sudan’s shadowy war economy and the links to an array of international facilitators and enablers, which include bankers, arms dealers, and businessmen.  This will be the first public presentation of The Sentry’s multi-country investigations into the links between massive corruption and armed conflict. 

The Sentry brings together an experienced team of investigators, including former employees of the FBI, Treasury Department, other government agencies, intelligence communities, and Congress, as well as contributions from field researchers, country experts, academia and press. Researchers pored through thousands of pages of legal records, corporate filings, financial statements, transaction and shipping documents, and other official correspondence; tracked suspects’ online social media footprints; and utilized satellite imagery to gather and analyze data about their assets and movements. Investigators traveled to multiple locations including Melbourne, Adelaide, Addis Ababa, Kampala, Juba, Cairo and Nairobi, to gather evidence and interview hundreds of experts and eyewitnesses, many of whom spoke under the condition of anonymity.    

WHO:   The Sentry co-founders George Clooney and John Prendergast, Not on Our Watch co-founder Don Cheadle, report author J.R. Mailey and key Sentry investigators. Interview opportunities with report authors should be requested prior.  

FOR MEDIA:    Credentialed media are encouraged to attend the press conference. Please RSVP for the press conference (include your full name and media outlet) to gh@enoughproject.org                             

LOCATION:    THE NATIONAL PRESS CLUB, Holeman Lounge 
                        529 14th Street, NW, Washington, DC 20045

DATE/TIME:     Monday, September 12, 2016
                         10:00am – 11:00am ET

LIVESTREAM:  For media unable to attend the press conference in person, a livestream of the event of the event will begin at 10:00 am ET at www.thesentry.org/live                                                                         

About THE SENTRY
The Sentry seeks to disrupt and dismantle the networks of military officers, government officials, businessmen, arms dealers, bankers, and other enablers who benefit financially and politically from Africa’s deadliest conflicts. Our investigations follow the money from conflict zones and into global economic centers, using open source data collection, field research, document collection, and state-of-the-art network analysis technology. The Sentry provides information and analysis that engages civil society and media, supports regulatory action and prosecutions, and provides policymakers and the private sector with the information they require to take effective action. Co-founded by George Clooney and John Prendergast, The Sentry is an initiative of the Enough Project and Not On Our Watch (NOOW), with its implementing partner C4ADS. Current countries of focus are South Sudan, Sudan, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Somalia, and the Central African Republic.  Learn more at TheSentry.org

Enough Project Statement on the Democratic Republic of Congo National Dialogue, U.S. and E.U. Policy

Date: 
Aug 31, 2016

 

Tomorrow marks the start of the National Dialogue, as called for by the President of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) Joseph Kabila. The dialogue is intended to cover 11 topics, mainly focused on political and electoral issues. According to the Constitution of the DRC, national elections are to be held on November 19, 2016, and President Kabila is to step down on December 19.  However, the vast majority of the opposition is not participating in the dialogue. Furthermore, the Secretary General of one of the only opposition parties that is participating in the dialogue, Jean-Bertrand Ewanga of the Union Pour la Nation Congolaise (UNC), resigned today citing that the dialogue was a ploy to extend President Kabila's term. On August 20, the Congolese Independent National Electoral Commission (CENI) said that elections would not be held on time.  

The Enough Project issued the following statements regarding the start of the Dialogue:

Sasha Lezhnev, Enough Project Associate Director of Policy, said: “As it is currently organized without civil society or most of the opposition, the dialogue cannot deliver on ensuring a democratic transition in Congo. The U.S. and European Union should enact targeted sanctions and other financial pressure on President Kabila's inner circle until he announces he will step down and hold timely, free, and fair elections.”

Annie Callaway, Enough Project Advocacy and Activist Manager, said: “The dialogue can only be successful if it meaningfully includes Congolese civil society and opposition groups and focuses on ensuring that free and fair elections are held as soon as possible. The United States and European Union must not allow a poorly constituted dialogue to overshadow grave concerns about the Kabila regime's broader strategy of undermining democracy and human rights. The Congolese people have fought hard for their Constitution, and it is critical that it is upheld and supported.”

For media inquiries or interview requests, please contact:
Greg Hittelman, Director of Communications, +1 310 717 0606gh@enoughproject.org

About THE ENOUGH PROJECT
The Enough Project, an atrocity prevention policy group, seeks to build leverage for peace and justice in Africa by helping to create real consequences for the perpetrators and facilitators of genocide and other mass atrocities. Enough aims to counter rights-abusing armed groups and violent kleptocratic regimes that are fueled by grand corruption, transnational crime and terror, and the pillaging and trafficking of minerals, ivory, diamonds, and other natural resources. Enough conducts field research in conflict zones, develops and advocates for policy recommendations, supports social movements in affected countries, and mobilizes public campaigns. Learn more – and join us – at www.EnoughProject.org

 

شبكات الدولة العميقة تختطف و تقوض الإقتصاد السوداني

Date: 
Aug 29, 2016

 

الفساد الفاحش المحمي بواسطة الدولة , سوء الإدارة المالية , الموازنة السرية , و محاربة الدولة لمواطنيها, تدفع بتفاقم الأزمة الإقتصادية المزمنة و المعاناة الإنسانية.

29 أغسطس 2016 – الدولة العميقة التي تتألف من المقربين من النظام والمؤسسات التجارية التي تديرها وكالات قطاع الأمن قد استولت بصورة خفية على الإقتصاد الوطني في السودان, كما يكشف ذلك تقريرحديث منشور اليوم بواسطة مشروع كفاية.
تقرير "كعب أكيل - تدهور إقتصاد نظام الخرطوم: تقاطع الحرب , المصلحة و الجشع" للكاتب سليمان بلدو يبين أن الإقتصاد المتدهور و المعاناة الإنسانية الواسعة في السودان هي نتيجة للفساد الفاحش المكرس من قبل الدولة , السياسات الإقتصادية غير المدروسة و الحروب الوحشية المكلفة للدولة ضد مواطنيها.

قال سليمان بلدو مستشار مشروع كفاية و كاتب التقرير , "الأزمة الإقتصادية المتفاقمة في السودان , إلى حد كبير , ذاتية المنشأ. العقوبات الإقتصادية و عزلة السودان الدولية تفاقم المشكلة فقط و لكن لم تخلقها. إتخاذ خطوات جريئة عاجلة أشد ما تكون الحاجة اليها  لوضع حد للحرب الأهلية , إجتثاث الفساد و الحد من الإنفاق الحكومي من شأنها أن تقطع شوطاً طويلاً في تحفيف معاناة الشعب السوداني و إنهاء عزلة البلاد." 

نتائج التقرير تقوض بصورة مباشرة جهود حملة العلاقات العامة و الضغط الممارس من قبل حكومة عمر البشير التي تدعي بأن العقوبات الأمريكية هي السبب الوحيد لأزمات الإقتصاد القومي المزمنة. يعرض التقرير بصورة أبعد إن مستوى الفساد في اعلي قمم المسؤلية وسوء الإدارة قد حولا المال العام بعيداً عن الخدمات و القطاعات المنتجة  ذات الفائدة للشعب.
أضاف بلدو: "يستطيع السودان التغلب على صعوباته الإقتصادية فقط عندما تجعل حكومته تنمية و رفاهية شعبه هي أولويتها القصوى. ليحدث ذلك , على نظام الحكم ان الإنخراط بصورة جادة و إستباقية في الجهود الدبلوماسية  لإيجاد السلام الدائم العادل للبلاد بإشراك المعارضين , جماعات المجتمع المدني , المجموعات المتأثرة بنزاعات السودان العديدة ،  و أصحاب المصلحة الآخرين و كل الجهات الفاعلة ذات النفوذ."

الفرض الحازم للعقوبات على إيران ، وروسيا ودوّل اخري دفع المؤسسات الدولية المالية  الي تجنب المخاطر و التوقف عن التعامل مع العملاء ذوي الخطورة بما في ذلك السودان. تجنب المخاطر هذا أدي الي  عزلة مالية خلقت بدورها  أزمة سيولة نقدية في خزينة الدولة السودانية. قد إعتمد مسئولو النظام و أنصاره على السيولة النقدية للدولة للحفاظ على أسلوب حياتهم البزخة عالية التكلفة و تمويل شبكات المحسوبية. 

يري التقرير أن الضغط المالي على القادة السودانيين يمكن تشديده أو تخفيفه بواسطة صانعو القرار الأمريكي كجزء من إستراتيجية اسلوب الاكراه و الترغيب لدعم صفقة السلام الشامل في السودان التي تقود إلى التحول الديمقراطي.
كما أضاف بلدو: " رغم إن الإتحاد الأفريقي و الأمم المتحدة يقودان جهودا دبلوماسية لحل الأزمات في السودان, لكن تملك الولايات المتحدة نفوذا كبيرا لدفع هذا الضغط الإقليمي و الدولي, مستخدمةً ما لديها من نفوذ بسبب تطبيق  عقوباتها الإقتصادية على السودان."

توصيات التقرير السبعة الرئيسية:
بالنسبة لحكومة السودان , يوصى مشروع كفاية بالآتي:

1.أنهاء النزاع: دعم حل حقيقي شامل و جامع لإنهاء حروب السودان الأهلية وقيادة البلاد نحو التحول الديمقراطي.

2-  زيادة المحاسبة: محاربة الفساد الرسمي  و إتخاذ تدابير الشفافية, و إعطاء المراجع العام المستقل سلطات  النيابة العامة, وتمكين مؤسسات المحاسبة الأخرى مثل غرفة السودان للمظالم العامة (غرفة أمين المظالم) حسب المعايير الدولية الراسخة. إصلاح الهيكلة و التفويض الممنوح لسلطات الآلية الوطنية لمحاربة الفساد المكونة مؤخراُ تماشياً مع المعايير وأفضل الممارسات المعمول بها دولياً. 

3-حماية إستقلال القضاء و الإعلام.
4-  دعم متابعة و إعادة الأموال العامة المسروقة.
بالنسبة للمعارضة السودانية , منظمات المجتمع المدني, الأكاديميين, و خبراء الإصلاح المؤسسي , يوصي مشروع كفاية بما يلي:

5-  التخطيط لتحقيق التكامل و الإصلاح: السعي الحثيث من أجل التنسيق و التكامل بين المبادرات الجارية لغرض تطوير السياسات البديلة لأصلاح القطاع الإقتصادي و القطاعات الحيوية الأخرى , بهدف إستقرار الدولة في حالة الأنتقال إلى الديمقراطية.

6-  بحث و توثيق جميع الأموال و الإصول العامة المنهوبة. إعداد خطط لإسترداد تلك الأصول و محاسبة المسئولين عن تسريبها.
بالنسبة للإتحاد الأفريقي و لجنة الأمم المتحدة الإقتصادية لأقريقيا , يوصى مشروع كفاية بما يلي:

7-  دعم التحقيقات في التمويل غير المشروع: تقديم المساعدة الفنية لجهود منظمات المجتمع المدني لتمكينها من تحديد و تقصي و توثيق التدفقات المالية من السودان , و بشكل خاص تسريب عائدات النفط. ثم تطويرآليات المحاسبة وذلك بدعم الجهود المبذولة لأسترداد تلك الأموالد

الرابط للتقرير الكامل: http://eno.ug/2bi0WcB
لإستفسارات وسائل الإعلام أو طلب المقابلات, الرجاء الإتصال على:
Greg Hittelman , مدير الإتصالات , تلفون: 310 717 0606 +1 , إيميل: gh@enoughproject.org

عن مشروع كفاية:
مشروع كفاية , هو مجموعة مختصة بالسياسات تستهدف منع  الجرائم الوحشية , و تسعى لبناء نفوذ من أجل السلام والعدالة في أفريقيا  بالمساعدة علي سن عقوبات حقيقية ضد مرتكبي جرائم الإبادة الجماعية  و معاونيهم و مرتكبي الفظائع الجماعية الأخرى. و يهدف مشروع كفاية ايضا إلى مواجهة الجماعات المسلحة المنتهكة للحقوق و الأنظمة المعتدية و القاءمة علي نهب الأموال العامة وً  الفساد الفاحش و الإرهاب و الجزائم العابرة للحدود و نهب والإتجار بالموارد المعدنية , وتهريب العاج , والماس , و الموارد الطبيعية الأخرى. يقوم مشروع كفاية بإجراء دراسات ميدانية  في مناطق النزاعات  , ويطور و يدافع عن التوصيات المتعلقة بالسياسات , و يدعم .مشروع كفاية  الحركات الإجتماعية في الإقطار المتضررة , و يسهم في الحشد الجماهيري  للحملات العامة المناصرة لتلك التوصيات لمعرفة المزيد – إنضم إلينا – في الموقع www.enoughproject.org

“Deep State” Networks Hijack, Undercut Sudan Economy

Date: 
Aug 29, 2016

 

State-enshrined grand corruption, financial mismanagement, covert budgets, and war on citizenry found to drive chronic economic crisis and human suffering

A “deep state” consisting of regime insiders and commercial enterprises run by agencies in the security sector has covertly hijacked the national economy in Sudan, reveals a new report published today by the Enough Project. 

The report, “Khartoum’s Economic Achilles’ Heel: The Intersection of War, Profit, and Greed” by Suliman Baldo, details how a collapsing economy and widespread human suffering in Sudan is the result of state-enshrined grand corruption, ill-advised economic policies, and expensive brutal wars against its own citizens. 

Suliman Baldo, Enough Project Advisor and report author, said: “Sudan's worsening economic crisis is largely self-inflicted. International sanctions and Sudan's isolation compounded the problem but did not create it. Taking desperately needed bold steps to end the civil war, root out corruption, and reduce government spending would go a long way to easing the suffering of the Sudanese people and ending the country's isolation.” 

The report findings directly undercut recent public relations and lobbying efforts by the government of Omar al-Bashir claiming that U.S. sanctions are the sole cause of the nation’s chronic economic crisis. The report further exposes how high level corruption and mismanagement diverts public money away from services and sectors that would benefit the people.

Baldo added: “Sudan will be able to overcome its economic difficulties only when its government makes the welfare and development of its people its top priority. For that to happen, the regime has to be seriously and proactively engaged in diplomatic efforts for finding a just and lasting peace for the country with the participation and direct involvement of the opposition, civil society groups, communities affected by Sudan’s many conflicts, and all other stakeholders and actors with influence.”

Tighter enforcement of sanctions on Iran, Russia, and other targets has prompted global financial institutions to stop doing business with clients in high risk jurisdictions, including Sudan. This “de-risking” process has led to financial isolation and created a cash crunch for Sudanese state coffers. Regime officials and their supporters have relied on this cash to maintain high-cost lifestyles and fund patronage and security networks.

The report argues that financial pressure on Sudanese leaders can be tightened and eased by U.S. policymakers in strategic ways as part of a system of coercion and incentives to support an inclusive peace deal in Sudan that leads to a transition to democracy. 

Baldo added: “While it is true the African Union and the UN are leading diplomatic efforts to resolve the crisis in Sudan, the US wields considerable influence to advance that regional and international push, using leverage it has from the application of its economic sanctions on Sudan.”

7 key report recommendations:

To the Government of Sudan, the Enough Project recommends the following:

1. End conflict. Facilitate a genuinely comprehensive and inclusive solution to end Sudan’s civil wars, and steer the country to a democratic transition.

2. Increase accountability. Fight official corruption, and introduce transparency measures. Give Sudan’s independent Auditor’s Chamber prosecutorial powers. Empower other accountability institutions, such as Sudan’s Chamber of Public Grievances (ombudsman chamber), according to well-established international standards. Reform the mandate, composition, and powers of the recently-formed National Anti-Corruption Commission in accordance with international standards and best practice.

3. Protect the independence of the judiciary and the media.

4. Support the tracing and return of stolen public funds.

To the Sudanese opposition, civil society, academics, and institutional reform experts, the Enough Project recommends:

5. Plan for integration and reform. Work for better coordination and integration of ongoing initiatives for the development of alternative policies for the reform of the economic sector and other sectors vital for the stability of the state in the event of transition to democracy.

6. Research and document all stolen public funds and assets. Prepare plans for the recovery of these assets and for holding accountable those responsible for their diversion.

To the African Union and the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (ECA), the Enough Project recommends:

7. Support illicit finance investigations. Provide technical assistance to civil society efforts to enable them to identify, investigate, and document illicit financial flows from Sudan, in particular from the diversion of oil revenue. Then, enhance accountability by supporting efforts to recover such funds.

Link to the full report: http://eno.ug/2bi0WcB

For media inquiries or interview requests, please contact:
Greg Hittelman, Director of Communications, +1 310 717 0606gh@enoughproject.org

About THE ENOUGH PROJECT
The Enough Project, an atrocity prevention policy group, seeks to build leverage for peace and justice in Africa by helping to create real consequences for the perpetrators and facilitators of genocide and other mass atrocities. Enough aims to counter rights-abusing armed groups and violent kleptocratic regimes that are fueled by grand corruption, transnational crime and terror, and the pillaging and trafficking of minerals, ivory, diamonds, and other natural resources. Enough conducts field research in conflict zones, develops and advocates for policy recommendations, supports social movements in affected countries, and mobilizes public campaigns. Learn more – and join us – at www.EnoughProject.org.

UN Security Council Votes ‘Yes’ on Intervention Force for South Sudan

Date: 
Aug 12, 2016

Enough Project experts available for interviews and analysis

The United Nations Security Council has just authorized an intervention force for South Sudan. The mandate of the force would prioritize the protection of civilians and act to bolster the tenuous peace process in the country.

Brian Adeba, Associate Policy Director at the Enough Project, said: This vote should be applauded. Peace and the protection of civilian lives in South Sudan should be the principal elements in the discourse on the intervention force. The intervention force will supplement the regional effort to cement peace and protection of civilians in South Sudan.

John Prendergast, Founding Director of the Enough Project, said: "Beefing up the protection of civilians in high risk areas is a crucial upgrade to the international community's response to the South Sudanese crisis.  However, it is crucial that international leverage be increased for the unhindered deployment of that force, the delivery of life-saving aid, and the implementation of the peace agreement.  The best way to enhance international leverage is to impose targeted sanctions on spoilers and move forward with an arms embargo.  Threats no longer seem to faze those prosecuting the war.  The bark needs to move to a bite."

Adeba added: “The intervention force holds tremendous potential to protect civilians and sustain peace in South Sudan.”

As South Sudan approaches the first year anniversary of the peace deal signed on August 26, 2015 that ended its civil war, the situation continues to be volatile. Sporadic armed conflict, atrocities, and military attacks on civilians continue in the capital and across the country. Hundreds have been killed and thousands have been displaced in the most recent fighting, and in many areas communities and internally displaced people face famine-like conditions.

Experts at the Enough Project are now available for comment, analysis and interviews:

Recent TV interviews:

Recent reports on South Sudan:

Recent op-eds:

Congressional testimony:

For media inquiries or interview requests, please contact: Greg Hittelman, Director of Communications, +1 310 717 0606gh@enoughproject.org.

About THE ENOUGH PROJECT
The Enough Project, an atrocity prevention policy group, seeks to build leverage for peace and justice in Africa by helping to create real consequences for the perpetrators and facilitators of genocide and other mass atrocities. Enough aims to counter rights-abusing armed groups and violent kleptocratic regimes that are fueled by grand corruption, transnational crime and terror, and the pillaging and trafficking of minerals, ivory, diamonds, and other natural resources. Enough conducts field research in conflict zones, develops and advocates for policy recommendations, supports social movements in affected countries, and mobilizes public campaigns. Learn more – and join us – at www.EnoughProject.org.

Un nouveau rapport dénonce le système destructeur et criminel mis en place par les élites au pouvoir en République centrafricaine

Date: 
Aug 3, 2016

Un nouveau rapport intitulé « The Bangui Carousel: How the recycling of political elites reinforces instability and violence in the Central African Republic » (Tours de manège à Bangui : Comment le recyclage des élites politiques aggrave l’instabilité et la violence en République centrafricaine) publié par Enough Project, révèle comment un groupe restreint d’individus se succède aux plus hautes fonctions de l’État centrafricain, dans une spirale de corruption qui nuit à la gouvernance et alimente l’instabilité et les conflits armés.

Christopher Day, coauteur du rapport et membre non résident d’Enough Project, déclare : « La nature même du système politique mis en place par l’élite centrafricaine est au cœur de la crise que traverse actuellement le pays, dont une large part est encore contrôlée par des groupes armés et où de nombreux civils voient leur vie bouleversée par la violence et les déplacements. Ils doivent avoir la possibilité de repenser et de réformer le système politique qui les a exclus pendant si longtemps. »

Le rapport expose les raisons des violences persistantes qu’a connues la République centrafricaine pendant plusieurs décennies et propose d’importantes recommandations en vue de répondre aux enjeux liés à la fragilité institutionnelle, la corruption généralisée et l’exclusion politique, et donc de favoriser la stabilité et la paix. Selon le rapport, plus de 2 millions de personnes, soit la moitié de la population centrafricaine, souffrent de la faim, et près de 415 000 personnes sont toujours déplacées.

Brad Brooks-Rubin, directeur des Politiques auprès d’Enough Project, souligne : « Il est temps de mettre un terme au Manège de Bangui. Les élites se succèdent régime après régime, dans le cadre d’un système marqué par des structures de gouvernance faibles leur permettant de mettre leurs fonctions au service de leur intérêt personnel. Le Président Touadéra et la communauté internationale doivent tirer les leçons du passé et mettre en œuvre des réformes garantissant une structure de gouvernance plus transparente et responsable, qui puisse enfin agir pour le bien de tous. »

Nathalia Dukhan, analyste et chercheuse sur la République centrafricaine auprès d’Enough Project, ajoute : « La République centrafricaine se trouve à un tournant historique et les mesures prises par le Président Touadéra auront un impact décisif sur l’avenir du pays. Les régimes politiques qui se sont succédés au cours des dernières décennies ont plongé des millions de Centrafricains dans des conditions de vie déplorables, tout en favorisant l’émergence de groupes rebelles prédateurs. Pour rompre avec le passé, il est crucial que le nouveau gouvernement reconnaisse les conséquences néfastes du syndrome décrit par le Manège de Bangui et plutôt que de promouvoir des auteurs d’atrocités et de crimes économiques à des postes politiques clés, les réformes doivent viser mettre fin au pillage des ressources publiques et à l’impunité de la classe dirigeante. »

Recommandations

1. Mettre en place des institutions solides et indépendantes pour lutter contre la corruption

Le gouvernement doit instaurer un système de gestion financière transparent et responsable. Celui-ci doit comprendre une fonction d’audit général fiable ainsi que l’examen des principaux contrats conclus par les gouvernements successifs (passés et actuel), et donner à l’administration fiscale les moyens de garantir le respect des mesures de perception de l’impôt. Le nouveau gouvernement doit également créer des organismes de lutte contre la corruption et obliger les hauts fonctionnaires à déclarer leur patrimoine à leur nomination, puis tous les ans.

2. Améliorer la transparence concernant l’exploitation des ressources naturelles (recettes, sous-traitance et dépenses) pour lutter contre la corruption

Les États-Unis et les autres donateurs doivent inciter le gouvernement de la RCA à mettre en place des mécanismes visant à lutter contre la corruption aux plus hauts niveaux, mais aussi fournir une assistance technique pour faciliter leur mise en œuvre. Ces mécanismes doivent inclure : 1) une procédure d’appel à la concurrence transparente pour l’octroi des concessions d’exploitation des ressources naturelles ; 2) la publication annuelle du budget de l’État ; et 3) l’obligation de rendre publics les contrats d’exploitation des ressources naturelles.

3. Imposer des sanctions ciblées et renforcer leur application à l’encontre des personnes qui compromettent la paix

Le Conseil de sécurité des Nations Unies, les États-Unis et l’Union européenne doivent imposer des sanctions supplémentaires aux personnes et aux entreprises qui tentent de compromettre la stabilité et la transition vers une bonne gouvernance par des faits de violence armée ou en facilitant la corruption publique.

4. Veiller à ce que la reprise du processus de Kimberley bloque le trafic des diamants de conflit

Selon la façon dont elle est gérée, la reprise du Processus de Kimberley pour le commerce des diamants bruts est susceptible de donner au gouvernement des sources de revenus légitimes ou, à l’inverse, de permettre aux groupes armés de profiter à nouveau du trafic des diamants de conflit.

5. Relancer le processus ITIE pour rendre les revenus tirés des ressources naturelles plus transparents.

Si elle est mise en œuvre dans son intégralité, l’Initiative pour la transparence dans les industries extractives (ITIE) pourra permettre d’éviter et de réduire la corruption dans le commerce des ressources naturelles, en rendant les transactions transparentes.

6. Renforcer le système judiciaire et promouvoir les activités de la Cour pénale spéciale

Les donateurs internationaux (tels que les États-Unis, l’Union européenne et la Banque mondiale) doivent accroître les financements afin de reconstruire le système judiciaire de la RCA, actuellement inefficace. Il s’agit, en particulier, de s’assurer que la Cour pénale spéciale dispose des fonds, de l’expertise internationale et de l’indépendance nécessaires pour agir et poursuivre les responsables de violations des droits de l’homme.

7. Aider à renforcer les capacités et la protection de la société civile et des médias

La société civile et la presse jouent un rôle essentiel dans la surveillance et, à terme, l’affaiblissement du Manège de Bangui. Elles s’assurent également que les membres du gouvernement cherchent à servir le peuple plutôt que leurs intérêts personnels. Le nouveau gouvernement de la RCA est invité à s’inscrire au programme de Partenariat mondial pour la responsabilité sociale (GPSA) de la Banque mondiale, dans le cadre duquel il pourra renforcer les capacités de la société civile centrafricaine.

8. Réformer le processus de nomination du gouvernement

Si les cas de favoritisme politique lors des nominations au gouvernement ne sont pas rares, cette pratique est poussée à l’extrême en RCA. Pour pallier ce déséquilibre, le gouvernement de la RCA doit élaborer et intégrer des critères basés sur le mérite pour la nomination des ministres et des responsables politiques.

Lien vers le rapport complet : http://eno.ug/2aprjwJ
La synthèse en Françaishttp://eno.ug/2b3cX7b

Pour toute requête de la part des médias ou demande d’entretien, veuillez contacter : Greg Hittelman, directeur de la Communication, +1 310 717 0606gh@enoughproject.org.

À propos de ENOUGH PROJECT

Organisme de promotion des politiques de prévention des atrocités, Enough Project cherche à mobiliser les efforts en faveur de la paix et de la justice en Afrique en s’efforçant d’appliquer des sanctions contre les auteurs et les complices de génocides et d’autres atrocités de masse. Enough lutte contre les régimes kleptocrates violents et les groupes armés portant atteinte aux droits, alimentés par la grande corruption, la criminalité et la terreur à l’échelle internationale, ainsi que le pillage et le trafic de minéraux, d’ivoire, de diamants et d’autres ressources naturelles. Enough mène des enquêtes de terrain dans les zones de conflits, élabore des recommandations politiques en faveur desquelles il plaide, soutient des mouvements sociaux dans les pays touchés par des conflits et organise des campagnes publiques. Pour en savoir plus et nous rejoindre, rendez-vous sur www.EnoughProject.org.

The Bangui Carousel: New Report Exposes Destructive, Deadly Pattern of Ruling Elites in Central African Republic

Date: 
Aug 2, 2016

 

A new report, “The Bangui Carousel: How the recycling of political elites reinforces instability and violence in the Central African Republic,” published today by the Enough Project, reveals how a small group of elites rotate through positions of power in a cycle of corruption that undermines governance and contributes to instability and armed conflict.

Christopher Day, report co-author and Enough Project Non-Resident Fellow, said: “The nature of CAR's elite politics is at the heart of the country's current crisis, where much of the country is still controlled by armed groups, and where so many ordinary Central Africans have had their lives upended by violence and displacement. They must have an opportunity to rethink and transform the political system that has excluded them for so long.”

The report details how the Central African Republic (CAR) has endured persistent violence for decades, and offers critical recommendations to address institutional weakness, entrenched corruption, and political exclusion in order to support greater stability and peace. According to the report, more than 2 million people, or half of the CAR’s population, are experiencing hunger, and nearly 415,000 people remain internally displaced.

Brad Brooks-Rubin, Director of Policy at the Enough Project, said: "It is time to bring the Bangui Carousel described in this report to an end. On the Carousel, elites cycle through regime after regime within a system marked by weak governance structures that enable these elites to exploit their positions for personal benefit. President Touadéra and the international community must learn from these lessons of the past and institute reforms that ensure a more transparent and accountable structure, one that can finally govern for the benefit of all the people."

Nathalia DukhanCAR Field Analyst and Researcher at the Enough Project, said: “The Central African Republic is at a crucial turning point, and actions taken by President Touadéra will have a decisive impact on the country's future. Decades of rule by despotic regimes have plunged millions of Central Africans into unbearable living conditions, while enabling the emergence of predatory rebel groups. Breaking with the past means that the new government must urgently address the syndrome described by the Bangui Carousel. Rather than placing perpetrators of atrocities and economic crimes in power, reforms must aim to stop the pillaging of CAR's resources and end impunity among the political elites.” 

Selected report excerpts:

  • “[S]uccessive rulers in CAR have maintained authority largely by centralizing control where possible, and extended personal rule by dispensing patronage in return for political support, in particular by personally appointing to senior posts those who served in previous governments or trusted family members. This system has fostered division between the capital and the countryside, incubated the grievances of armed groups, and above all, created significant incentives to hijack the state through violence. This occurs as groups have competed for control of the state to access resources and privileges…”
     
  • “There are few effective state or local government institutions, making the role and impact of the recycled individual leaders that much more potent. Unfortunately, it has been the complete dismantling of institutional checks and balances, the weakening of political parties and civil society organizations, and the use of violence to suppress opposition that have been the hallmark of many of these leaders.”
     
  • “If policymakers fail to address the structural issues that led to the crisis in CAR, the country is likely to repeat its violent past.”

Key report recommendations:

1. Establish robust and independent anti-corruption institutions. The CAR government should implement a transparent and accountable system for financial management, including a strong auditor general-type function, empowerment of tax authorities to ensure proper revenue collection measures are followed, and review of major contracts issued by both past and current governments. Anti-corruption bodies must be established within the new government, and senior officials should declare their assets upon appointment and annually thereafter.

2. Prioritize transparency in natural resource revenues, contracting, and spending to prevent corruption. The U.S. government and other donors should urge the CAR government to set up mechanisms to prevent high-level corruption and provide technical assistance to help implement them. These should include a transparent bidding process for the awarding of natural resource concessions, the annual publishing of the government budget and establishing a requirement that natural resource exploitation contracts are made public.

3. Impose targeted sanctions and strengthen enforcement against those who undermine peace. The U.N. Security Council, the U.S. government, and the EU should impose additional sanctions on individuals and companies that attempt to undermine stability and the transition to good governance through acts of armed violence or through facilitating public corruption.

4. Ensure that the restart of the Kimberley Process prevents the flow of conflict diamonds. The restart of the Kimberley Process for rough diamonds in CAR could give the government legitimate revenue streams, or conversely, allow armed groups to profit from a conflict diamond trade again, depending on how it is run.

5. Restart the EITI process to make resource revenues more transparent. If fully implemented, the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) can help prevent and reduce corruption in the natural resource trade by making revenue payments and receipts transparent. 

6. Strengthen the judiciary in CAR and promote Special Criminal Court prosecutions. International donors such as the U.S. government, the EU, and the World Bank should increase funding to rebuild the crippled judiciary in CAR, and in particular, make sure that the Special Criminal Court has sufficient funds, international expertise, and independence to operate and prosecute those responsible for human rights violations and abuses.

7. Help improve capacity and safeguards for civil society and the media. The role of civil society and the press is critical in monitoring, and eventually diminishing, the Bangui Carousel and ensuring that those involved in government in CAR are serving the people rather than their own interests. The new CAR government should opt in to the World Bank’s Global Partnership for Social Accountability, so that the country can benefit from the bank’s capacity building opportunities for civil society.

8. Reform the government appointment process. It is not unusual for political patronage to inform government appointments, but in CAR this has been extreme. The CAR government should develop and incorporate merit-based criteria for the appointment of ministers and other political appointees in CAR such that patronage is much more balanced with merit.

Link to full report: http://eno.ug/2aprjwJ

For media inquiries or interview requests, please contact: Greg Hittelman, Director of Communications, +1 310 717 0606gh@enoughproject.org.

About THE ENOUGH PROJECT

The Enough Project, an atrocity prevention policy group, seeks to build leverage for peace and justice in Africa by helping to create real consequences for the perpetrators and facilitators of genocide and other mass atrocities. Enough aims to counter rights-abusing armed groups and violent kleptocratic regimes that are fueled by grand corruption, transnational crime and terror, and the pillaging and trafficking of minerals, ivory, diamonds, and other natural resources. Enough conducts field research in conflict zones, develops and advocates for policy recommendations, supports social movements in affected countries, and mobilizes public campaigns. Learn more – and join us – atwww.EnoughProject.org

As South Sudan Faces Dangerous Crossroads, State Institutions Could Hold Hope for Future Peace

Date: 
Jul 27, 2016

 

New report details competitive grand corruption underlying conflict

new report published today by the Enough Project points to an intentional effort by South Sudan’s political elite to undermine state institutions in order to protect their corrupt extraction of national wealth and maintain power at any cost. As South Sudan’s tenuous peace agreement holds, the country faces a tipping point that could lead to a new outbreak of devastating armed conflict largely driven by competition between its leaders over the spoils of power.

The new report, "A Hope from Within? Countering the intentional destruction of governance and transparency in South Sudan," by Enough’s Brian Adeba, offers some hope that existing institutions in the country, properly empowered, could support peace. While making critical recommendations to support transparency and anti-corruption efforts, the report reveals new details of widespread government corruption left unchecked as official investigations are sidelined or simply ignored.

Brian Adeba, report author and Associate Director of Policy at the Enough Project, said: "Many government institutions, commissions, offices and staff in South Sudan are ready and willing to do their jobs, but are undermined every step of the way, underfunded and disempowered by leaders who have intentionally disintegrated state capacity for governance and transparency."

Drawing on field research, the report shows that the weaknesses of governance institutions in South Sudan stem from deliberate efforts by elite politicians. The report reviews the weaknesses of three of South Sudan’s governance institutions most critical to establishing accountability: the Anti-Corruption Commission, the National Audit Chamber, and the Public Accounts Committee in the National Legislative Assembly. All three institutions face considerable operational challenges that have undercut their effectiveness in implementing their constitutional mandates.

Adeba added: "In the absence of accountability and transparency, South Sudan risks more cycles of chaos, conflict and mass atrocities fueled by corrupt leaders manipulating ethnic divisions and jockeying for the spoils of power. Reforming institutions of governance in South Sudan is imperative if the country is to avoid another war."

Brad Brooks-Rubin, Director of Policy at the Enough Project, said: “In the midst of conflict and tragic human suffering, like we have seen far too often in South Sudan’s young history, it can be easy to look past the detailed work and commitment needed to build a transparent and accountable state that can truly function for its people.  As demonstrated in the field work that underlies this report, however, failing to do so can contribute to disastrous results.  Fortunately, the report also shows that South Sudan possesses the necessary legal and organizational infrastructure to enable meaningful change and create a state that can meet the expectations of its people, responsible investors, and the international community.”

Selected report highlights:

  • “Because governance institutions work at the behest of elite politicians, it is in the interest of these politicians to disable these institutions and limit their ability to play their role in oversight, regulation, and providing checks and balances on other parts of the government.” 
  • "In 2015, the [Anti-Corruption Commission] completed a high-profile investigation involving the alleged misappropriation of $12 million earmarked for procurement of military supplies by officials at the Ministry of Defense and Veterans Affairs and the national army, the Sudan People’s Liberation Army (SPLA). The case has been forwarded to the Ministry of Justice but there is little public information available about whether the ministry has taken further action regarding these serious allegations."
  • "Although the audits that the [National Audit Chamber] has produced show gross misappropriation of public funds, an insignificant number of people have been held accountable to date. As one interviewee said, ‘the government is just like a cow that is milked but not fed. All audits die somewhere.’"
  • “Accountability was never built into the governance structure of the violent kleptocratic system that the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement (SPLM) established in the aftermath of the 2005 peace deal that ended the 22-year north-south war. By nature, violent kleptocracies hijack governance institutions for the personal financial benefit of those within the ruling network and for the security of the regime. These kleptocracies use extreme violence, including mass atrocities, to maintain their hold on power. In this regard, South Sudan’s governance institutions were hijacked and the ability of these institutions to implement oversight functions was compromised. Wanton corruption by the political elite accelerated to unprecedented levels and further stymied the government’s ability to deliver services to the populace. In 2012, President Salva Kiir estimated that $4 billion was siphoned from the country’s coffers.”

Overview of report recommendations:

1. Fully fund and staff the agencies responsible for governance for long-term economic benefits

South Sudan’s governance institutions have the potential to counter corruption by promoting economic transparency and accountability. It is critical that the institutions that South Sudan already has in place be able to function properly. They need full budget allocations, sufficient staffing levels, and unobstructed authority to carry out their duties, including enforcement actions.

2. Boost civil society’s role in the public sphere

Governments and multilateral bodies that support good governance should intensify their advocacy to open and preserve political space for civil society in South Sudan. The government of South Sudan should also opt in to the Global Partnership for Social Accountability (GPSA), which is the World Bank’s arm for providing support to civil society. Although assistance goes to civil society organizations, the government must first agree to the GPSA’s framework.

3. Tie external assistance to strict budget oversight

Many donors are reluctant to offer assistance without seeing significant improvements in peace, security, and the way South Sudanese leaders manage public funds. Most agree that it is crucial to ensure that donor funding is not misappropriated. Donors should, therefore, provide support that is subject to “dual-key” provisions similar to those of Liberia’s Governance and Economic Management Assistance Program (GEMAP). GEMAP, a partnership implemented in 2006 to 2010 between the government of Liberia and international partners, was designed to ensure transparency and accountability in Liberia’s government spending, particularly with natural resource revenues.

4. Develop additional mechanisms for donor coordination and evaluation of decision-making using international standards

In addition to donor insistence on the implementation of dual-key budgeting systems, the donor community must develop and adhere to a clear system for coordination on priorities and programs for South Sudan. Donor coordination is critical to ensuring that the government of South Sudan receives consistent messages and donors do not duplicate efforts or work at cross-purposes.

5. Support domestic enforcement and external accountability measures

On the domestic front in South Sudan, donors should support the establishment of a range of institutions and mechanisms spelled out in the August 2015 peace agreement for open government and holding culpable individuals responsible for their actions. Support for the establishment of the Hybrid Court for South Sudan to prosecute atrocity and economic crimes—as provided in the 2015 peace deal—is essential to the foundation for accountability and transparency and can counter impunity. Institutional support to boost the performance of oversight institutions to enhance accountability is equally important.

Where domestic measures fail, the international community should use available tools to hold accountable the actors who are undermining progress. The United States, for instance, should use authorities of the Treasury Department’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) to investigate the ways that the proceeds of corruption are laundered out of South Sudan, whether to neighboring countries or beyond. Most financial transactions in this context involve the use of U.S. dollars. When U.S. dollars move through the international financial system, they eventually pass through the United States, giving the U.S. government jurisdiction to take action, particularly when these dollars are believed to be the proceeds of criminal activity.  

Link to the full report: http://eno.ug/2a1W5ij

For media inquiries or interview requests, please contact: Greg Hittelman, Director of Communications, +1 310 717 0606gh@enoughproject.org.

About THE ENOUGH PROJECT

The Enough Project, an atrocity prevention policy group, seeks to build leverage for peace and justice in Africa by helping to create real consequences for the perpetrators and facilitators of genocide and other mass atrocities. Enough aims to counter rights-abusing armed groups and violent kleptocratic regimes that are fueled by grand corruption, transnational crime and terror, and the pillaging and trafficking of minerals, ivory, diamonds, and other natural resources. Enough conducts field research in conflict zones, develops and advocates for policy recommendations, supports social movements in affected countries, and mobilizes public campaigns. Learn more – and join us – at www.EnoughProject.org.

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