Media Advisories

Warner Bros “Good Lie” Opens Nationwide Friday: Witherspoon Film Depicts Courageous, Harrowing Lost Boys Journey: But Is Same Story Repeating for South Sudan’s Kids Today?

Date: 
Oct 1, 2014

MEDIA ADVISORY – Enough Project
Contact: Greg Hittelman, +1 310 717-0606, gh@enoughproject.org

Warner Bros “Good Lie” Opens Nationwide Friday:

Witherspoon Film Depicts Courageous, Harrowing Lost Boys Journey: But Is Same Story Repeating for South Sudan’s Kids Today?

October 1, 2014 --- Warner Brothers’ new motion picture “THE GOOD LIE,” starring Reese Witherspoon, opens this Friday, October 3, to select theaters nationwide. The film, already garnering critical acclaim – and a 10 minute standing ovation at the Toronto Film Festival – depicts the courageous, terrifying journey of the Lost Boys and Girls of Sudan, children who trekked on foot hundreds of miles to escape a war in Sudan that ended in 2005.

But that harrowing experience is being reenacted again, as thousands of children in South Sudan today are victims caught in a new civil war. For journalists reviewing or reporting on this film, the Enough Project can offer commentary and key facts making the connection to the current crisis in South Sudan.

HISTORY NEVER TO BE REPEATED, REPEATING TODAY:

John Prendergast, founding director of the Enough Project, who has a role in the film along with Witherspoon and actual Lost Boys and Girls, said: “‘The Good Lie’ should have been a slice of history, never to be repeated. But a new war, rising from the embers of the one that brought the Lost Boys and Girls to the United States, has again engulfed South Sudan. A whole new generation of lost children is being created, an outcome which still can be prevented if the current war can be brought to a quick conclusion.”

“’The Good Lie’ is seeded with hope, hope that has been temporarily hijacked by the corruption-fueled elites now fighting this unnecessary war,” said Prendergast, “Hope for peace remains alive, but those self-serving leaders must be motivated by tough international action, including personal property and assets seizure, to support a peace agreement that allows the people of South Sudan to, together, write the next chapter of their history.”

KEY FACTS:

  • As of September 2014, 2.2 million people are currently facing emergency food insecurity, and that number is likely to rise to 2.5 million by March 2015.
  • 1.35 million people have been displaced from their homes, and 453,600 have fled to neighboring countries.
  • The UN estimates 9,000 child soldiers have been brought into the conflict.
  • An estimated 100,000 civilians are seeking protection on United Nations bases in South Sudan.
  • There have been over a dozen violations of the cessation of hostilities agreement between government and rebel forces.
  • In June 2014, Doctors Without Borders reported that in one camp where over 47,000 are seeking protection, 3 children under 5 die every day.

 

BACKGROUND:

South Sudan's civil war, which has exacted a terrible toll on its civilian population, has its origins in a power struggle between factions aligned with President Salva Kiir and those who have joined former Vice President Riek Machar. Despite repeated pledges to put down their weapons, both sides have demonstrated a clear commitment to a military “solution” instead of a negotiated settlement.

For more detail, read the new Enough Project Report “Spoils of War, Spoilers of Peace.”

For media inquiries or to arrange an interview with an Enough Project spokesperson, please contact: Greg Hittelman, Director of Communications, +1 310 717-0606, gh@enoughproject.org

###

The Enough Project is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on the crises in Sudan, South Sudan, eastern Congo, Central African Republic, and areas affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough conducts intensive field research, develops practical policies to address these crises, and shares sensible tools to empower citizens and groups working for change. To learn more: www.enoughproject.org.

Enough Project Reactions to Appointment of New UN Special Envoy on Congo

Date: 
Jul 18, 2014

The United Nations Secretary-General announced yesterday that the new UN Special Envoy to the Great Lakes Region will be senior Algerian diplomat Said Djinnit, replacing Mary Robinson. His mandate is focused on peace and security in the D.R. Congo and the region. The Enough Project warmly welcomes Ambassador Djinnit in his new appointment.

Enough Project Senior Policy Analyst Sasha Lezhnev said: "Ambassador Said Djinnit can be a boon to peace in eastern Congo, as his senior-level negotiating experience in Africa on security issues has earned him the respect of regional leaders, and as he will be based full-time in the region. Ambassador Djinnit should first focus on firm 3-month benchmarks for progress on the disarmament of the deadly FDLR rebel group, which remains a major obstacle to regional peace."

Enough Project Founding Director John Prendergast said: "The appointment of Ambassador Djinnit is an excellent choice given his strong regional background and the wide respect he enjoys from African leaders. Going forward, Ambassador Djinnit should work closely with Angolan President Dos Santos to broaden the agenda of the regional peace process to include economic cooperation and war crimes accountability. In addition, he should establish a civil society feedback mechanism to incorporate their input, including women's voices, into the heads-of-state peace process."

Enough Project Policy Associate Holly Dranginis said: "Mary Robinson made it a priority to listen to women in the Great Lakes, support them, and understand their ideas and demands in the context of this region's peace process. Special Envoy Djinnit should take care to carry on that work and ensure that momentum for women's empowerment and inclusion in the region is not lost in this transition."

Enough Project Field Researcher Fidel Bafilemba said: "The FDLR is the main bottleneck for peace restoration in eastern Congo and the region at large. The FDLR cannot be given a leash to reorganize, and must be treated with strong measures as was the M23, otherwise the people of eastern Congo will continue to bear the brunt of the FDLR's brutality. Definitively resolving the FDLR is the greatest difference Said Djinnit can make to the Great Lakes crisis."

For media inquiries or interview requests, please contact:

Greg Hittelman, Communications Director, +1 310-717-0606, gh@enoughproject

###

The Enough Project is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on the crises in Sudan, South Sudan, eastern Congo, and areas affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough conducts intensive field research, develops practical policies to address these crises, and shares sensible tools to empower citizens and groups working for change. To learn more: www.enoughproject.org.

Sudan Unleashes a War Criminal Army

Date: 
Jun 26, 2014

Contact: Christina DiPasquale, +1 202-716-1953, Christina@fitzgibbonmedia.com

Enough Project & Satellite Sentinel Project report:

Sudan Unleashes a War Criminal Army

Regime Gives Janjaweed Genocidaires New Name, Weapons, and a License to Kill

June 26, 2014 (Washington, DC) -- One decade after Darfur’s Janjaweed militiamen earned global infamy as “devils on horseback,” Sudan is experiencing a wave of atrocities at the hands of their new incarnation as an official military entity, the “Rapid Support Forces” (RSF). An original report published today by the Enough Project and the Satellite Sentinel Project tracks the RSF in a cross-country campaign of civilian targeting, and presents the case for the individual criminal responsibility of high-level Sudanese government officials for both the war crimes and crimes against humanity perpetrated by the RSF.

The report, “Janjaweed Reincarnate: Sudan’s New Army of War Criminals”—the product of nine months of research by co-authors Akshaya Kumar and Omer Ismail—tracks the RSF across Sudan, connects the regime’s own public statements with evidence from affected communities, and identifies an array of crimes from grave human rights abuses and mass atrocities to cross-border elephant poaching.

Click here for a preview of the report from the New York Times, including a response from the Sudanese Embassy in Washington, DC.

"In Sudan today, the genocidaires are winning,” says Akshaya Kumar, report co-author and Sudan and South Sudan Policy Analyst at the Enough Project. “A decade ago, Janjaweed fighters received international condemnation for their brutality in Darfur. While the world's attention has drifted, these men are still at large and committing human rights abuses. Now, as Sudan's Rapid Support Forces, they are heavily armed, in uniform, flying the national flag, and with an official license to kill.”

"Darfuris aren't the only victims now. Our research shows that these Rapid Support Forces, under command and control of the government, have inflicted brutal violence on civilians in South Kordofan, North Kordofan, even in Sudan's capital city Khartoum,” said Omer Ismail, co-author and Enough Project Senior Advisor. “As security service officers they boast full immunity. The RSF are indisputably an arm of this government and so senior government officials, including President Bashir, should bear responsibility for their actions."

"Our research fuses nine months of satellite imagery with extensive research and interviews to paint a vivid portrait of an increasingly brazen, resurgent and reinforced Janjaweed force,” said John Prendergast, co-founder of the Enough Project. “What we see is a new kind of international and regional security threat, a military force that not only regularly commits atrocities and abuses against the citizenry, but up to their necks in transnational criminal activity, including cross-border human rights abuses, elephant poaching, and resource exploitation.”

“Sudan's government are so confident they will get away with this new campaign that they're not even bothering to hide their connections to these fighters,” added Kumar. “In fact, the Sudanese government proclaims their connection to this army of war criminals.”

Link to download the new report “Janjaweed Reincarnate”: http://eno.ug/Jreport

For media inquiries or to schedule an interview with the report authors, please contact Christina DiPasquale at +1 202-716-1953 or Christina@fitzgibbonmedia.com.

###

The Enough Project is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on the crises in Sudan, South Sudan, eastern Congo, and areas affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough conducts intensive field research, develops practical policies to address these crises, and shares sensible tools to empower citizens and groups working for change. To learn more: www.enoughproject.org.

The Satellite Sentinel Project, co-founded by George Clooney and John Prendergast, is a partnership between the Enough Project and Not On Our Watch. SSP uses satellite imagery and forensic investigation to assess the human security situation, and detect, deter and document war crimes and crimes against humanity. SSP recently announced an expansion of its work to focus on the economic drivers of mass atrocities and human rights abuses, and to encompass some of the world's most violent regions of conflict, including Sudan, South Sudan, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and the Central African Republic. For more information on the Satellite Sentinel Project, please visit www.satsentinel.org.

George Clooney and John Prendergast’s Wake-Up Call: Sudan’s Silent War May be World’s Most Murderous

Date: 
Jun 11, 2014

MEDIA ALERT: 11 June 2014
Contact: Christina DiPasquale, 202.716.1953, Christina@fitzgibbonmedia.com

George Clooney and John Prendergast’s Wake-Up Call:
Sudan’s Silent War May be World’s Most Murderous

George Clooney and Enough Project co-founder John Prendergast, in an opinion piece published today, call for urgent attention to a resurgence of the war by Sudan’s government against its own people. The statement comes in advance of a new investigative report by Vice Media’s Ben Anderson premiering this Friday on HBO, which reveals violence in Sudan rising to unprecedented levels.

The original Vice News segment "THE FORGOTTEN WAR" airs this Friday, June 13 at 11:00 pm (ET) on HBO. 

“Under the cover of darkness, in a world whose attention is diverted by more camera-accessible crises in Syria, Ukraine, and the Central African Republic (CAR), the Sudan government has revived and intensified its genocidal strategy in the main war zones of Sudan,” say Clooney and Prendergast, who together founded the Enough Project’s Satellite Sentinel Project (SSP).  

“This is a crisis the U.S. can help resolve”

The Clooney-Prendergast statement also comes with key recommendations that concerned Americans and policymakers can support, including preventive diplomacy and giving the U.S. Treasury Department the resources it needs to follow the money enabling mass atrocities and enforce sanctions against Sudanese war criminals and their commercial interests.

Last month, the two founders announced that SSP, a program using satellite imagery and forensic investigation to monitor and warn against atrocities and human rights abuses in war-torn Sudan and South Sudan, will expand its work to undertake forensic investigations to reveal how those committing mass atrocities are funding their activities and where they are hiding their stolen assets.

To read the full opinion piece by Clooney and Prendergast, visit: https://news.vice.com/article/sudans-silent-suffering-is-getting-worse
 
Learn more about the conflict in Sudan and how to take action at: www.eno.ug/1pD8Z6v

To speak with an Enough Project or Vice Media spokesperson on this topic, please contact Christina DiPasquale at 202.716.1953 or Christina@fitzgibbonmedia.com.

###

The Enough Project is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on the crises in Sudan, South Sudan, eastern Congo, and areas affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough conducts intensive field research, develops practical policies to address these crises, and shares sensible tools to empower citizens and groups working for change. To learn more:  www.enoughproject.org.

The Satellite Sentinel Project, co-founded by George Clooney and John Prendergast, is a partnership between the Enough Project and Not On Our Watch. SSP uses satellite imagery and forensic investigation to assess the human security situation, and detect, deter and document war crimes and crimes against humanity. SSP recently announced an expansion of its work to focus on the economic drivers of mass atrocities and human rights abuses, and to encompass some of the world's most violent regions of conflict, including Sudan, South Sudan, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and the Central African Republic.  For more information on the Satellite Sentinel Project, please visit www.satsentinel.org.

Security Council Issues Sudans Statements, Addresses Violence in Jonglei

Date: 
Aug 23, 2013

Enough Project Media Advisory

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

WASHINGTON -- Today, the United Nations Security Council issued a presidential statement on Sudan and South Sudan and a press statement on the situation in Jonglei. The Enough Project welcomes the Council's statements and looks forward to discussing these developments in greater detail. 

John Prendergast, Co-Founder of the Enough Project stated:

"After almost a year of silence, the Security Council's call on Sudan to allow unfettered humanitarian access to the Two Areas will help bring this often neglected crisis back to the world's attention. However, their failure to mention of a self-determination referendum for Abyei or reference the need for a comprehensive approach to Sudan’s conflicts means more must be done."

Akshaya Kumar, Sudan and South Sudan Policy Analyst at the Enough project stated:

"In a major shift, for the first time, the Security Council expressed concerns about attacks against civilians by militias and the South Sudanese army in Jonglei state. International attention to this humanitarian crisis unfolding in the dark is welcome. We must do more to support inclusive peace and mediation efforts to negotiate a political solution and end the violence in Jonglei."

#

The Enough Project is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on the crises in Sudan, South Sudan, eastern Congo, and areas affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough conducts intensive field research, develops practical policies to address these crises, and shares sensible tools to empower citizens and groups working for change. To learn more about Enough, go to www.enoughproject.org.

Enough Media Advisory: Action Needed Now to Apprehend Joseph Kony and End the LRA

Date: 
Oct 7, 2012

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Tracy Fehr, tfehr@enoughproject.org, +1 202-459-1219

Please Note: Enough Project LRA Policy Analyst Ashley Benner and Enough Project LRA Field Researcher Kasper Agger are available to interview about the LRA issue.

WASHINGTON – Today, Invisible Children launched the video “MOVE” as part of its Kony 2012 campaign that introduced millions of people to the Lord’s Resistance Army, or LRA, crisis. Resolving this long-standing conflict requires further immediate and robust action by the United States government. The Obama administration must commit more diplomatic, military, intelligence, and logistical support to ensure the arrest of LRA leader Joseph Kony and his top commanders as part of a comprehensive strategy to end the LRA threat.

Enough Project LRA Policy Analyst Ashley Benner and LRA Field Researcher Kasper Agger recently returned from a trip to East and Central Africa. During this trip, Enough documented numerous challenges that hamstring current U.S., regional, and international efforts to bring an end to the LRA.

“The Obama administration has invested resources to help end the LRA conflict, including the deployment of military advisors to Central and East Africa,” said Ashley Benner, LRA Policy Analyst at the Enough Project. “But if the current trajectory continues, these efforts are not likely to succeed. To ensure that the mission to end the LRA is successful, the United States should eliminate LRA ’safe havens,’ keep the African armies vigorously involved in combating the LRA, provide additional helicopters and intelligence-gathering capabilities, and urge Uganda to institute a clear transitional justice policy that encourages the LRA to finally stop fighting.”

“We are coming up on the one year anniversary of the deployment of U.S. special forces to Central and East Africa to advise and assist in the fight against the LRA,” said Kasper Agger, LRA Field Researcher at the Enough Project. “The inconvenient truth is that the end of the LRA remains distant. Some progress has been made to encourage defections through 'come home' messages and safe places that LRA combatants can escape to; but the African forces are too few to cover the dense jungles and LRA safe havens are developing in Darfur, Congo, and parts of the Central African Republic where the group can loot, abduct and attack civilians. U.S. special forces should stay on the ground to keep the African forces committed and diplomatic efforts should focus on brokering access for the Ugandan army into the safe havens.”

“The existing international effort is not sufficiently designed at present to succeed in taking Kony off the battlefield and cratering the LRA leadership,” said Enough Project Co-founder John Prendergast. “The U.S. and Uganda need to collaborate more closely in constructing commando operations aimed at bringing Kony and other senior LRA leaders to justice wherever they are.  Current battlefield deployments are far from where Kony is hiding, and every day that goes by allows Kony and his commanders to recruit and rearm while international will and resources remain stagnant. That is a recipe for well-intentioned failure.”

For more information about recommendations for the U.S. and international community to ensure that efforts to end the LRA conflict are successful, read:

###

Enough is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, the Enough Project focuses on crises in Sudan, eastern Congo, and areas of Africa affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough’s strategy papers and briefings provide sharp field analysis and targeted policy recommendations based on a “3P” crisis response strategy: promoting durable peace, providing civilian protection, and punishing perpetrators of atrocities. Enough works with concerned citizens, advocates, and policy makers to prevent, mitigate, and resolve these crises. For more information, please visit www.enoughproject.org.

       

 

The Sudans to Conclude Negotiations While Humanitarian Situation Remains Unresolved

Date: 
Sep 21, 2012

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:

In Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: Amanda Hsiao, South Sudan Field Researcher, +251 (0) 923249353, ahsiao@enoughproject.org, Skype: ayrhsiao

In Washington, DC: Jennifer Christian, Sudan/South Sudan Policy Analyst, +1 202-604-4518, jchristian@enoughproject.org, Skype: jennchristian

ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia -- On September 23, Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir and South Sudanese President Salva Kiir are expected to meet in Addis Ababa to conclude agreements on outstanding issues between their two countries, including oil and financial arrangements, border disputes and demarcation, border security arrangements, and Abyei. 

“A grand bargain across the remaining issues between Sudan and South Sudan exists,” said Amanda Hsiao, Field Researcher. “The question is, will Presidents Kiir and Bashir demonstrate the leadership needed to locate the political compromises necessary for peace between the two countries?” 

Former South African President Thabo Mbeki, lead mediator of the negotiation process and head of the African Union High-Level Implementation Panel, is scheduled to brief the African Union Peace and Security Council on Monday, September 24 on the outcome of the negotiation process and provide recommendations on how to resolve any remaining outstanding issues.

In contrast, negotiations on the conflicts in South Kordofan and Blue Nile have not made enough progress. The government of Sudan continues to prevent the unhindered delivery of independent humanitarian aid to civilian populations in the two states.

“The government of Sudan’s continued denial of international humanitarian access to the two states contravenes a U.N. Security Council resolution, an agreement on aid delivery, and international law,” said Jennifer Christian, Policy Analyst. “Khartoum’s behavior demands immediate action on the part of the U.N. Security Council in the form of targeted sanctions and other actions designed to ensure the immediate delivery of necessary aid to affected populations.”

Who: Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir and South Sudanese President Salva Kiir

What: Meeting to conclude agreements on outstanding issues between Sudan and South Sudan

Where: Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

When: Sunday, September 23, 2012

Why: The meeting comes one day after the deadline set by the African Union for the conclusion of negotiations between Sudan and South Sudan on all outstanding issues arising from the latter’s declaration of independence in July 2011.

#

Enough is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, the Enough Project focuses on crises in Sudan, eastern Congo, and areas of Africa affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough’s strategy papers and briefings provide sharp field analysis and targeted policy recommendations based on a“3P” crisis response strategy: promoting durable peace, providing civilian protection, and punishing perpetrators of atrocities. Enough works with concerned citizens, advocates, and policy makers to prevent, mitigate, and resolve these crises. For more information, please visit www.enoughproject.org.     

New UW-Madison Student Group Pushes for Conflict-Free Campus

Date: 
Sep 18, 2012

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: JD Stier, Raise Hope for Congo campaign manager, (202)250-4057, jdstier@enoughproject.org

Madison, WI– On Friday, September 21, the Conflict-Free Campus Initiative, or CFCI, at UW-Madison will host a kickoff event introducing how students can get involved with promoting conflict-free technology on campus in order to stop the trade of conflict minerals funding armed groups in eastern Congo. The Conflict-Free Campus Initiative is a movement that has spread to more than 100 campuses across the nation, and has led 12 schools so far to pass resolutions giving preference to conflict-free electronics products.

The event will feature unique campus and national speakers including Raise Hope for Congo campaign manager and UW-Madison alum, JD Stier. Filmmaker Paul Freedman (Sand and Sorrow, Halfway Home) will film the event and document the journey of the student leaders as they launch the Conflict-Free Campus Initiative on Madison's campus, which will become a core story line for a comprehensive film about the conflict in Congo.

Who: Conflict-Free Campus Initiative at UW-Madison, a new student-led group advocating for the university administration to pass a conflict-free resolution

What: Conflict-Free Campus Initiative Kickoff

Where: Beefeaters Room in the Memorial Union, 800 Langdon St., Madison, WI, 53706

When: Friday, September 21, 2012 from 6:30PM – 7:30 PM, CST

Why: Armed groups in eastern Congo earn hundreds of millions of dollars every year from the sale of conflict minerals—gold, tin, tantalum and tungsten.  In order to control the mines, these armed groups use systematic violence and rape as a way to intimidate local communities.  The ongoing conflict in eastern Congo has claimed more than five million lives, and still continues today.

As purchasers of electronics products, U.S. consumers have a powerful role to play in helping to prevent this deadly trade. Collectively, students can work together to create a demand for responsible sourcing of minerals from Congo. With more than 40,000 students enrolled, UW-Madison has significant purchasing power that can be used to pressure electronics companies into creating conflict-free products and responsibly sourcing minerals from the Congo.

#

The Conflict-Free Campus Initiative draws on the power of student leadership and activism to bring about peace in Congo. It is a project of the Enough Project 's Raise Hope for Congo campaign and STAND.

Raise Hope for Congo aims to build a permanent and diverse constituency of activists who will advocate for the human rights of all Congolese citizens and work towards ending the ongoing conflict in eastern Congo. For additional information on the Conflict-Free Campus Initiative, and Raise Hope for Congo, please visit: http://www.raisehopeforcongo.org/content/conflict-free-campus-initiative

Enough Project: Sudan Fails to Comply with Nine Provisions of U.N. Security Council Resolution

Date: 
Aug 2, 2012

 

Enough Project Media Advisory

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Thursday, August 2, 2012

Contact: Jonathan Hutson, +1 202.386.1618jhutson@enoughproject.org

Today, August 2, marks the deadline for the conclusion of negotiations between the governments of Sudan and South Sudan as set by U.N. Security Council Resolution 2046. In an effort to identify the compliance of the government of Sudan, the government of South Sudan, and the Sudan People's Liberation Movement-North's with the provisions of Resolution 2046 to date, the Enough Project published a summary chart of its compliance tracker. The summary chart provides an organized outline showing that the government of Sudan has failed to comply with nine provisions of Resolution 2046, whereas the government of South Sudan has failed to comply with two provisions, and the SPLM-N has complied or has expressed a willingness to comply with all relevant provisions.

"Relatively speaking, the government of Sudan's non-compliance with critical provisions of Resolution 2046 is clear. These critical provisions include requirements that the Sudanese government withdraw its forces from the Abyei area and agree to the Tripartite Proposal on the delivery of humanitarian aid to South Kordofan and Blue Nile. In the coming days and weeks, the U.N. Security Council and the African Union Peace and Security Council should take into account the discrepancies in non-compliance between the government of Sudan, on the one hand, and the government of South Sudan and the SPLM-N, on the other, particularly vis-à-vis the possible application of sanctions pursuant to operative paragraph 6 of Resolution 2046," said Enough Project Sudan Policy Analyst Jennifer Christian.

Who: The Enough Project, a nonprofit organization based in Washington D.C. that is dedicated to ending genocide and crimes against humanity.

WhatUnited Nations Security Council Resolution 2046 Compliance Tracker: Summary Chart

Where: Addis Ababa, where negotiations between Sudan and South Sudan resumed today 

When: Thursday, August, 2, 2012 

Why: To summarize the government of Sudan, the government of South Sudan, and the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement-North’s respective compliance, or lack thereof, to date with the provisions of U.N. Security Council Resolution 2046.

#

Enough is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, the Enough Project focuses on crises in Sudan, eastern Congo, and areas of Africa affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough’s strategy papers and briefings provide sharp field analysis and targeted policy recommendations based on a“3P” crisis response strategy: promoting durable peace, providing civilian protection, and punishing perpetrators of atrocities. Enough works with concerned citizens, advocates, and policy makers to prevent, mitigate, and resolve these crises. For more information, please visit www.enoughproject.org.

A Multicultural Celebration in Honor of World Refugee Day

Date: 
Jun 19, 2012

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Buky Williams, 202-481-8172, bwilliams@enoughproject.org

 

Falls Church, VA - On Saturday, June 23, the Enough Project’s Darfur Dream Team, in  partnership with the Lutheran Social Services of the National Capital Area, will host a celebration in honor of World Refugee Day.

The event will include music, art, and food and is anticipated to be an educational, uplifting, fun, and participatory experience for all ages. This event is free and open to the general public, however a special invitation is extended to refugee families who have resettled in the DMV area. This celebration is possible due to the generous donations provided by Pop Chips, Whole Foods, Trader Joes, Amoos Kabob, Merkamo Ethiopian Bistro, Darfur Interfaith Network, Founding Farmers, and Blessed Coffee.

Who: Refugees resettling in the National Capital Area, the service providers and volunteers who support them, the Enough Project’s Darfur Dream Team Sister Schools Program, and Lutheran Social Services of the National Capital Area

What: A multicultural World Refugee Day Celebration

Where: St. Paul's Lutheran Church- 7426 Idylwood Road Falls Church, VA 22043
(Metro: West Falls Church)

When: Saturday, June 23, 2012 from 11:00AM - 3:00PM ET

Why: To celebrate World Refugee Day and honor the resilience of refugees resettling in the greater Washington, DC community. This event will also raise awareness about the situation in Darfur, emphasize the importance and urgency of keeping the peace in Darfur, and establish a strong foundation of refugee education to ensure a more positive future for the people of Darfur and Sudan.

The Enough Project is an anti-genocide organization whose Darfur Dream Team Sister Schools Program has a two-fold mission to provide quality education to every Darfuri refugee child while simultaneously developing personal connections between students from Darfur and the United States to promote mutual understanding.

Lutheran Social Services of the National Capital Area has been compassionately serving the community’s most vulnerable citizens since 1917. Their numerous programs which include adoption and foster care, community education, disaster response, refugee services, and youth camp were implemented as responses to emerging challenges faced by community members. Their Refugee and Immigrant Services program serves refugees and asylees in handling the challenges and opportunities they face once settled in the national capital area and help assist them in their journey to self-sufficiency.  

Syndicate content