Somalia

A Green Zone for Somalia?

War-torn Somalia

Somalia President May Quit, Advisers say - Washington Post

Date: 
Dec 26, 2008
Author: 
Stephanie McCrummen

Advisers to Somali President Abdullahi Yusuf said Wednesday that he would yield to mounting internal and international pressure and resign over the weekend, but officials close to him insisted the situation remained dynamic.

Washington Post, December 26, 2008

15 Years After Black Hawk Down: Somalia's Chance? (Activist Brief)

Read our Activist Brief to learn more about the history of U.S. engagement in Somalia, better understand the crucial crossroad where Somalia finds itself, and how the international community should apply Enough’s 3P strategy for crisis response.

Amid Growing International Pressure, Somalia's President Resigns - Christian Science Monitor

Date: 
Dec 29, 2008
Author: 
Jonathan Adams

Widely considered an obstacle to peace, Abdullahi Yusuf announced his resignation on Monday.

Christian Science Monitor, December 29, 2008

Editorial: Still Sinking, Somalia Goes From Bad to Worse - Washington Post

Date: 
Dec 26, 2008

The Bush administration is trying to head off another disaster in Somalia, a failed state that has confounded three successive U.S. administrations. The administration won't succeed.

Washington Post, December 26, 2008

Somalia worldmapper.org map

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Somalia displacement

15 Years After Black Hawk Down: Somalia's Chance? (Strategy Paper)

It has been almost 15 years since Somali militias shot down two U.S. Black Hawk helicopters over the capital Mogadishu and killed 18 American servicemen in a battle that also killed more than 1,000 Somalis. Since that fateful day in 1993, which had followed decades of American involvement that contributed directly to Somalia’s brokenness, the United States has largely turned its back on the fate of the Somali people. U.S. involvement has been rooted in counter-terrorism efforts in which the suffering of the Somali people has barely been factored beyond the sending of humanitarian band-aids to cover gaping human rights wounds.

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