Policy Essay

Looming Crisis: Open Wounds in Abyei Increase Risk of New War

In Abyei, a small but strategically important disputed area on the border between Sudan and South Sudan, rising inter-communal tensions have resulted in a marked escalation in conflict in recent weeks. 

Forgotten Wars: Sudan’s Periphery Smolders with Focus on South Sudan

Escalating violence, displacement, and new political developments in the areas along Sudan’s periphery—Darfur, South Kordofan, and Blue Nile—are going largely unnoticed as international attention focuses on violence in South Sudan.

Four Steps for the U.S. and U.N. to Defuse Congo's Escalating Crisis: Preventing Wider Conflict

The Enough Project has released this policy paper in advance of the July 25, 2013 Ministerial meeting of the U.N. Security Council. U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry will preside over the meeting to push for implementation of a peace accord signed in February 2013 by 11 African nations and four international organizations. The aims of the accord are to end the cycles of conflict and crisis in eastern Congo and to support an effective peace process in Africa's Great Lakes region. 

Congolese army soldiers await at frontlines

Policy Brief: The AUHIP Mandate Renewal, An Opportunity to Revitalize Efforts on Sudan

The mandate of the African Union High-Level Implementation Panel for Sudan and South Sudan, or AUHIP,expires on July 30, 2013. The renewal process and the panel’s forthcoming “final” report—surveying its work from October 2009 to the present day—present a unique opportunity to think about the future of this long struggle for peace.

Secretary-General Ki-moon Meets Chair of A.U. High-Level Panel Mbeki on Sudan

Policy Alert: Uganda Reinstates Key Tool to Boost Defections from the Lord's Resistance Army

Enough Project Policy Alerts provide a reaction and set of recommnendations to a significant development designed for policymakers, advocates, and other influential people participating in the policy making process.

A soldier from the Central African Republic stands guard.

The SEC’s Final Rule on Conflict Minerals: Reporting Requirements for Companies

On August 22, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, or SEC, adopted regulations for Section 1502, the provision of the Dodd-Frank financial reform law that deals with conflict minerals from the Democratic Republic of Congo, or DRC. The trade in these minerals fuels a conflict that continues to cause suffering among the people of eastern Congo.

Miner in the DRC

Have the Tripartite Partners Secured Humanitarian Relief for South Kordofan and Blue Nile?

Recently, the government of Sudan and the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement-North, or SPLM-N, signed separate memoranda of understanding, or MOUs, with the so-called “Tripartite Partners” comprised of the United Nations, the African Union, and the League of Arab States. While challenges remain, the MOUs are a positive step forward in securing unfettered access for international humanitarian aid organizations to conflict-affected populations in South Kordofan and Blue Nile.

Negotiations between the Two Sudans: The Safe Demilitarized Border Zone Explained

On June 7, yet another round of negotiations between officials from Sudan and South Sudan broke up without the conclusion of any concrete and sustainable agreements. This last round of talks centered, in large part, on discussions of the ill-defined international border that divides the two countries and related security issues.

The Two Sudans: A Tour of the Neighborhood

Prior to South Sudan’s independence in July 2011, Sudan was the largest country in Africa, bordering nine other states. Today, the two Sudans share a diverse and critical geopolitical sub-region that links the Sahara, the Sahel, the Horn, and the Great Lakes. In this report the Enough Project examines some of the two countries’ most important neighbors and regional relationships.

After the Kenyan Intervention in Somalia

If the first decade of the new millennium bears a single enduring political lesson,
it is this: Intervention strategies that plan the war but not the peace will fail.
Indifference to or wishful thinking about the crafting of a post-intervention political
order guarantees disorder, and can leave both the occupied country and the
intervening power worse off than before.

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