U.S. Policy

Open Letter on Enhancing U.S. Policy towards Sudan and South Sudan

The Enough Project and Humanity United have released an open letter on enhancing U.S. Policy towards Sudan and South Sudan to Secretary Kerry, Ambassador Rice, and Ambassador Power. The letter, signed by David Abramowitz of Humanity United and John Prendergast of the Enough Project, spells out three areas where U.S. policy could be enhanced towards both Sudan and South Sudan: promoting accountability, supporting peace, and fostering democratic transformation.

Discuss, Engage, Act: Massachusetts Activists Engage on Three Key Initiatives for Peace in the Congo

Nonprofit groups and campus organizations throughout Massachusetts recently united at Boston University for a conference with three key goals: Elevate the conversation on the Congo within our communities; Reinvigorate our civic engagement on policies that can help bring an end to the conflict in Congo; and Commit our campuses to the conflict-free movement.   Read More »

Congo: Sen. Durbin, 11 Members of Congress Urge SEC to Uphold Conflict Minerals Requirements

On April 14, the US District Court of Appeals issued its decision on a case challenging the validity of the Securities and Exchange Commission’s (SEC) conflict minerals rule that originated from Section 1502 of the Dodd Frank Wall Street Reform Act. 12 members of Congress led by Senator Durbin issued a letter to the SEC, strongly encouraging it to proceed with the implementation of the rule.  Read More »

Op-ed: Darfur, The Genocide America Forgot

Earlier this month, Sudan’s paramilitary Janjaweed forces razed 127 empty villages in Darfur to the ground. According to reports in local media, this was their second rampage over the same territory in as many months.   Read More »

New Targeted Sanctions for South Sudan Lack Clout

South Sudanese President Salva Kiirand former Vice-President Riek Machar (AP)

A week after President Obama announced potential targeted sanctions against individuals responsible for the ongoing violence in South Sudan both sides have expressed an overwhelming lack of concern that they will be affected.   Read More »

Still a Problem From Hell, Two Decades After Rwanda

Rwandan Genocide Remembrance

Twenty years after Rwanda’s horrors, there are signs of hope for a more effective international response to future genocides—but only if we recognize the evolution in genocidal tactics. This op-ed by John Prendergast originally appeared in The Daily Beast on the 20th anniversary of the Rwandan Genocide.  Read More »

New Obama Administration Support to Counter-LRA Mission Boosts Efforts to Prevent Atrocities in Central Africa

On March 23, the Obama administration announced that it will bolster the counter-LRA mission by deploying at least four helicopters to help find Joseph Kony.   Read More »

Hear Her Voice: Activists on Capitol Hill

HHV poster

Nearly 100 activists from 19 states came to the nation's capital for this year's Hear Her Voice conference, hosted by The Enough Project and Jewish World Watch. During this 3-day advocacy delegation and learning conference, advocates heard from policy experts, received advocacy training, and met with more than 50 congressional offices regarding the ongoing violence against civilians, particularly women, in Democratic Republic of Congo, Sudan, and South Sudan.  Read More »

U.S. Congress Acts on Sudan and South Sudan Conflicts

John Prendergast speaks before the House hearing on Sudan and South Sudan

Over the past few days, Congress has been active in its response to the conflicts unfolding in both Sudan and South Sudan. In the House, Rep. Chris Smith (R-NJ) of the Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Human Rights, and International Organizations held a hearing on Sudan and South Sudan.   Read More »

Caucus Looks for Support on Letter to the Administration on South Sudan

This week, the co-chairs of the U.S. House of Representatives Caucus on Sudan and South Sudan began seeking support from other members of Congress for a letter calling for deeper engagement on the conflict in South Sudan.   Read More »

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